Hiromi Hara

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hiromi Hara
Hiromi Hara 2007.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth (1958-10-19) October 19, 1958 (age 56)
Place of birth Kuroiso, Tochigi, Japan
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Playing position Forward (retired)
Youth career
1974–1976 Yaita Higashi High School
1977–1980 Waseda University
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1981–1992 Mitsubishi Motors 192 (65)
National team
1978–1988 Japan 75 (37)
Teams managed
1998–1999 Urawa Red Diamonds
2002–2005 FC Tokyo
2007 FC Tokyo

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

† Appearances (Goals).

Hiromi Hara (原 博実 Hara Hiromi?, born October 19, 1958 in Tochigi prefecture, Japan) is a retired Japanese football player. He currently serves as technical director for the Japanese national football team.

Playing career[edit]

After graduating from Waseda University in 1981, Hara joined Mitsubishi Heavy Industries F.C. (later to be Urawa Red Diamonds) as a forward.

Between 1978 and 1988 Hara played 75 games for the Japanese national football team, scoring 32 goals. Hara was known for his headers and was aptly nicknamed the "Asian Nuclear Warhead".

Post-playing career[edit]

Coaching career[edit]

Urawa Red Diamonds[edit]

Hara retired from football in 1992 and began his new career as the coach of the Youth Team of his old club, which had been renamed by this point as Urawa Red Diamonds. In 1998 Hara became the manager of Urawa's top squad. Initially he saw success, with the team achieving a 3rd place finish for J.League's second stage in 1998. However, during J.Legue's first stage of 1999, the team finished 13th in the standings and Hara was released.

Following his release from Urawa, Hara travelled to Spain to study the coaching methods applied by several La Liga clubs. Upon returning to Japan, he spent two years working as a commentator for Sky PerfecTV!.

FC Tokyo[edit]

In 2002 Hara decided to return to coaching as the manager of F.C. Tokyo. He brought youngsters such as Naohiro Ishikawa, Teruyuki Moniwa and Akira Kaji, introduced Spanish-style tactics into the young and fresh team, and won J. League Cup in 2004. Hara was released from his position as manager of the club in 2005. However in 2007 he was re-appointed as the club's manager, but was again released only after one season.

Japanese national team[edit]

On 12 February 2009, Hara was appointed by JFA as its new technical director for the Japanese national football team, responsible for strengthening the national team.[1] After fellow Waseda alumnus Takeshi Okada stepped down after leading Japan to a lauded performance at the 2010 FIFA World Cup, Hara was given the responsibility for finding his replacement, which was revealed in late August after protracted negotiations in Europe to be the Italian manager Alberto Zaccheroni. He also took charge in a caretaker capacity for the friendlies against Paraguay, leading Japan to a 1-0 win, and Guatemala, both of which were held at his former hunting ground in Saitama.[2][3]

Club career statistics[edit]

Club performance League Cup League Cup Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Japan League Emperor's Cup J. League Cup Total
1981 Mitsubishi Motors JSL Division 1 18 4 18 4
1982 18 7 18 7
1983 18 3 18 3
1984 18 8 18 8
1985/86 22 10 22 10
1986/87 22 8 22 8
1987/88 22 10 22 10
1988/89 18 3 18 3
1989/90 JSL Division 2 16 9 1 0 17 9
1990/91 JSL Division 1 18 3 0 0 1 0 19 3
1991/92 2 0 1 0 3 0
Country Japan 192 65 0 0 3 0 195 65
Total 192 65 0 0 3 0 195 65

International career statistics[edit]

Japan national team
Year Apps Goals
1978 6 1
1979 2 0
1980 5 2
1981 10 1
1982 6 3
1983 10 6
1984 7 5
1985 10 5
1986 6 7
1987 11 7
1988 2 0
Total 75 37

References[edit]

  1. ^ "JFA appoint Hara as new technical director". JFA. 2009-02-12. Retrieved 2014-12-10. 
  2. ^ "Hara encourages Japan to impress Zaccheroni". The Japan Times. 2010-09-04. Retrieved 2010-09-05. 
  3. ^ Andrew McKirdy (2010-09-05). "Kagawa's goal lifts Japan in rematch against Paraguay". The Japan Times. Retrieved 2010-09-05.