Hispano-Suiza J12

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Hispano-Suiza J12
HispanoSuizaJ12SportTorpedo1933.JPG
1933 Hispano-Suiza J12 Sport Torpedo
Overview
ManufacturerHispano-Suiza
Also called
Production1931–1938
Assembly
Designer
Body and chassis
ClassLuxury car
Body styleby arrangement with the customer's coachbuilder
LayoutFMR
Powertrain
Engine
  • 9,424 cc (575.1 cu in) OHV V-12
  • (11,310 cc (690.2 cu in) from 1935 on)[5]
Transmission3-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase
Chronology
PredecessorHispano-Suiza H6[6]

The Hispano-Suiza J12 is a luxury automobile that was made by Hispano-Suiza from 1931 to 1938.[5] It was the largest and most expensive car ever built by Hispano-Suiza.[2][3] It replaced the Hispano-Suiza H6.[6]

The J12 was powered by a 60° V12 engine with pushrod-operated overhead valves and a seven-bearing crankshaft.[1] The engine initially displaced 9.4 L (574 cu in)[1][6] with bore and stroke both being 100 mm (3.9 in) and with a compression ratio of 5.0:1,[1] delivered 220 hp at 3000 rpm.[1][6] Two cars were fitted with long-stroke engines displacing 11.3 L (690 cu in) and delivering 250 hp, and several J12s were later upgraded to the larger engine.[11] Each engine block was machined from a single 700 lb (318 kg) billet.[6] To demonstrate the high quality engineering and reliability of the J12, one car was driven from Paris to Nice and back without needing oil or water.[11] The J12 was only available as a chassis, buyers having to arrange with outside coachbuilders to build a body.[11]

Hispano-Suiza suspended automobile production in 1938 to concentrate on the manufacture of aircraft engines.[12][13]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Rogliatti 1973, p. 77.
  2. ^ a b Kimes 1990, p. 646.
  3. ^ a b Nicholson 1982, p. 307.
  4. ^ a b Kimes 1990, p. 642.
  5. ^ a b Robson 1990, p. 72.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Scott 1991, p. 52.
  7. ^ a b c d Robson 2001, pp. 248–249.
  8. ^ Given as 134 12 in (3,420 mm) in Kimes 1990, p. 648
  9. ^ a b Kimes 1990, p. 648.
  10. ^ Given as 157 34 in (4,010 mm) in Kimes 1990, p. 648
  11. ^ a b c Cheetham, Craig (2004). Vintage Cars - The Finest Prewar Automobiles. Rochester, United Kingdom: Grange Books. p. 105. ISBN 1840136359.
  12. ^ Robson 1990, p. 73.
  13. ^ Kimes 1990, p. 651.

References[edit]