Historic Seattle

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Historic Seattle's headquarters, the Henry H. Dearborn House (photographed 2007), is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Historic Seattle is a Seattle, Washington public development authority focused on preserving Seattle's architectural heritage.[1][2] For many years, they issued a monthly online magazine, Preservation Seattle[3] and are involved in advocacy and education.[1]

As a public development authority, Historic Seattle is a government-owned corporation.[4] Its 12-member board includes 4 members appointed by Seattle's mayor, 4 appointed by the PDA Council, and 4 elected by its constituency. All board members serve 4-year terms. Its mission is the "Preservation and enhancement of the historic heritage of Seattle for the mutual pride and enjoyment of all citizens, and creation of a more livable environment within the historic areas of the city."[2]

According to their website, as of 2006 they had completed 44 projects "in capacities ranging from owner/developer to consultant."[5] Among these were their own headquarters, Dearborn House.[6] Other prominent Seattle buildings with which they are or have been involved include the Good Shepherd Center in Seattle's Wallingford neighborhood, a former Catholic girls' home, which Historic Seattle owns and operates mainly as office space for non profit organizations;[7] the Cadillac Hotel in Pioneer Square, now the visitor's center of the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park;[8] and Town Hall, a former Christian Science church that now functions as a 900-seat venue for lectures and performances;[9] They have also been involved in one or another capacity with numerous houses including the Carpenter Gothic Twenty-third Avenue Houses, originally built in 1892-1893 as inexpensive housing; the Fourteenth Avenue Houses, a remnant of a late 19th-century community of mostly Finnish immigrants at Smith Cove; and Egan House with which Historic Seattle has ever been involved.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Frequently Asked Questions, Historic Seattle. Accessed 13 October 2007. Archived on the Internet Archive 2014-10-18.
  2. ^ a b Public Development Authorities: Historic Seattle PDA[permanent dead link], City of Seattle official site. Accessed 26 November 2008.
  3. ^ Home page, Historic Seattle. Accessed 13 October 2007. Current page does not mention the magazine 2016-01-28.
    Preservation Seattle home page. Accessed 13 October 2007. Archived on the Internet Archive 2014-04-17.
  4. ^ Public Corporations/Public Development Authorities (PDA) (RCW 35.21.730 - 35.21.755), Municipal Research and Services Center (MRSC) of Washington. Accessed 6 October 2008.
  5. ^ Completed Projects, Historic Seattle official site, 2006. Accessed online 27 November 2008. Archived on the Internet Archive 2008-12-14.
  6. ^ Dearborn House, Historic Seattle official site, 2006. Accessed online 27 November 2008. Archived on the Internet Archive 2014-10-03.
  7. ^ Good Shepherd Center, Historic Seattle official site, 2006. Accessed online 27 November 2008. Archived on the Internet Archive 2014-08-17.
  8. ^ The Cadillac Hotel, Historic Seattle official site, 2006. Accessed online 27 November 2008. Archived on the Internet Archive 2014-07-17.
  9. ^ Town Hall, Historic Seattle official site, 2006. Accessed online 27 November 2008. Archived on the Internet Archive 2012-06-11.
  10. ^ Egan House, Historic Seattle official site, 2006. Accessed online 27 November 2008. Archived on the Internet Archive 2012-06-11.

External links[edit]