Hitahdut HaIkarim

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Hitahdut HaIkarim (Hebrew: הִתְאַחֲדוּת האִכָּרים‎, lit. Farmers Federation) is a settlement movement for private farmers in Israel.

History[edit]

Hitahdut HaMoshavot BeYehuda VeShomron (Hebrew: התאחדות המושבות ביהודה ושומרון‎, Association of moshavot in Judea and Samaria) was founded in Yavne'el[citation needed] in 1920, making it the oldest agricultural organisation in Israel.[1] In 1927 it was expanded and renamed Hitahdut HaIkarim BeEretz Israel (Hebrew: התאחדות האיכרים בארץ ישראל‎, lit. Association of the Farmers in the Land of Israel).[citation needed] After Israeli independence it adopted its current name. The organisation was affiliated with the General Zionists,[citation needed] and later (as of 1985) with the Liberal Party.[2] It published the weekly Bustenai periodical in conjunction with the General Zionists between 1929 and 1939.[3]

Zionist leader Moshe Smilansky served as its president,[4] whilst Haim Ariav, a General Zionists member of the Knesset, served as its secretary.[5]

Member villages[edit]

Several agricultural communities (moshavim and community settlements) are affiliated with the organisation, including:

  • Adi, community settlement in northern Israel
  • Bat Shlomo, moshav in northern Israel
  • Elyashiv, moshav in central Israel
  • Hararit, community settlement in Western Galilee
  • Hibat Tzion, moshav in the central Coastal Plain
  • Kamon, community settlement in the Galilee
  • Katzir, Jewish locality in northern Israel
  • Kidmat Tzvi, moshav in central Golan Heights
  • Korazim, community settlement, Lower Galilee above the Sea of Galilee
  • Mikhmanim, community settlement Lower Galilee
  • Neve Michael, moshav in central Israel
  • Talmei Bilu, moshav in north-western Negev
  • Yuvalim, community settlement in the Galilee

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Former Farmers Association president dies Haaretz
  2. ^ Yael Yishai (1991). Land of Paradoxes: Interest Politics in Israel. SUNY Press. p. 68. ISBN 978-0791407257.
  3. ^ "Bustenai". Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved 14 August 2014.
  4. ^ Joseph B. Glass (2002). From New Zion to Old Zion: American Jewish Immigration and Settlement in Palestine, 1917–1939. Wayne State University Press. p. 252. ISBN 978-0814328422.
  5. ^ Haim Ariav: Public Activities Knesset

External links[edit]