Hoang Thanh Trang

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Hoang Thanh Trang
Hoang Thanh Trang.jpg
Full name Hoàng Thanh Trang
Country Vietnam
Hungary
Born (1980-04-25) 25 April 1980 (age 37)
Hanoi, Vietnam
Title Grandmaster
Woman Grandmaster
FIDE rating 2459 (June 2017)
Peak rating 2511 (November 2013)

Hoàng Thanh Trang (born 25 April 1980)[1] is a Vietnamese-born Hungarian chess Grandmaster.

Career[edit]

Born in Hanoi, Vietnam, Hoang moved with her family to Budapest when she was ten years old.[2] She was taught how to play chess at four and half years old by her father, who is her coach.[3]

She won the World Girls Junior (U-20) Championship 1998. In 2000, she won Asian Women's Championship in Udaipur.[4] Hoang won the board 1 gold medal at the 2005 European Club Cup (women's section) in Saint-Vincent, Italy, with an 80.0% score.[2] She started representing Hungary in 2006, having represented Vietnam up until then.[5]

In 2011, she won the European Women's Rapid Championship (Maia Chiburdanidze's Cup) in Kutaisi.[6][7]

In 2013 Hoang won the European Women's Championship, winning 7 games and drawing 4, ending up with a score of 9 out of 11 games.[8]

Hoang Thanh Trang bears dual citizenship of Vietnam and Hungary.[9] She graduated in Economics[3] from the Corvinus University of Budapest.

References[edit]

  1. ^ GM title application FIDE
  2. ^ a b "Records and beauties – Saint-Vincent wrap-up". ChessBase. 2005-09-30. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "GM Hoang Thanh Trang – Chasing her dream". Chessdom. 2012-10-15. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  4. ^ "Xu-Jun lifts crown". Tribuneindia.com. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  5. ^ Player transfers in 2006 FIDE
  6. ^ "VIKTORIJA CMILYTE BECAME THE NEW EUROPEAN CHESS CHAMPION IN TBILISI". European Chess Union. Retrieved 9 January 2016. 
  7. ^ European Women Rapid Championship: final ranking after 11 rounds Chess-Results.com
  8. ^ "Hoang Thanh Trang is European Women’s Chess Champion". Chessdom. 2013-08-03. Retrieved 9 October 2015. 
  9. ^ "Trang comes first at European Chess Champs". vietnambreakingnews.com. Retrieved 1 July 2014. 

External links[edit]