Holdrege, Nebraska

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Holdrege, Nebraska
Holdrege city hall
Holdrege city hall
Location of Holdrege, Nebraska
Location of Holdrege, Nebraska
Coordinates: 40°26′26″N 99°22′28″W / 40.44056°N 99.37444°W / 40.44056; -99.37444Coordinates: 40°26′26″N 99°22′28″W / 40.44056°N 99.37444°W / 40.44056; -99.37444
CountryUnited States
StateNebraska
CountyPhelps
Area
 • Total4.25 sq mi (11.00 km2)
 • Land4.23 sq mi (10.96 km2)
 • Water0.01 sq mi (0.04 km2)
Elevation
2,329 ft (710 m)
Population
 • Total5,495
 • Estimate 
(2019)[3]
5,408
 • Density1,277.58/sq mi (493.22/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
68949
Area code(s)308
FIPS code31-22640
GNIS feature ID0830051[4]
Websitewww.cityofholdrege.org

Holdrege is a city in Phelps County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 5,495 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Phelps County.[5] The Nebraska Prairie Museum is located in Holdrege.

History[edit]

Holdrege was established in 1883 when the railroad was extended to that point.[6] It was named for George W. Holdrege, a railroad official.[7] Holdrege was designated county seat in 1884.[8]

Holdrege was settled primarily by immigrants from Sweden in the 1880s and was named after George W. Holdrege, general manager of the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railroad Company. He constructed most of the line’s mileage in Nebraska, including a section through this small settlement in Phelps County. On December 10, 1883, the first train arrived in Holdrege, a little pioneer town inhabited by 200 people.

In 1884, a campaign was started to move the county seat from Phelps Center to Holdrege, and an election was scheduled for October. By that time, the town had acquired a block of ground on which to erect a courthouse. With calm assurance of victory at the polls, Holdrege laid the cornerstone of the building intended to be the Phelps County Courthouse. At the special election, Holdrege received a majority of the votes but the legality of the election was questioned. So citizens of Holdrege went to Phelps Center, picked up the official records and books and hid them for two months pending the arrival of new county officials who would take over on January 1, 1885. Holdrege succeeded in becoming the county seat and the courthouse was completed.

Holdrege was incorporated on February 14, 1884 and quickly became the metropolis of the county, being well located with good roads from all directions. The early history of the town was one of ups and downs—good crops one year then drought and no crops at all for several years. In 1910, C. W. McConaughy, a Holdrege grain dealer, began crusading for use of the Platte River to supplement subsoil moisture for farmlands in the area. His dream became reality when Central Nebraska Public Power and Irrigation District began its power production and irrigation operations and water flowed into Phelps County for irrigation in 1941.

A large increase in the population of Holdrege in the immediate post-war years was due mostly to irrigation. With irrigation came both stable and increased crop production, which brought a pipeline company, grain elevators, and agriculture-related businesses to town. The city was declared a first-class city on May 4, 1967.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.87 square miles (10.02 km2), of which 3.86 square miles (10.00 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[9]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18902,601
19003,00715.6%
19103,0300.8%
19203,1082.6%
19303,2635.0%
19403,3603.0%
19504,38130.4%
19605,22619.3%
19705,6357.8%
19805,624−0.2%
19905,6710.8%
20005,636−0.6%
20105,495−2.5%
Est. 20195,408[3]−1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
2012 Estimate[11]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 5,495 people, 2,351 households, and 1,496 families living in the city. The population density was 1,423.6 inhabitants per square mile (549.7/km2). There were 2,589 housing units at an average density of 670.7 per square mile (259.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.7% White, 0.1% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 1.5% from other races, and 1.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.7% of the population.

There were 2,351 households, of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.1% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.4% were non-families. 32.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.87.

The median age in the city was 42.4 years. 23.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.3% were from 25 to 44; 28% were from 45 to 64; and 19.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.5% male and 51.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 5,636 people, 2,355 households, and 1,544 families living in the city. The population density was 1,498.5 people per square mile (578.7/km2). There were 2,602 housing units at an average density of 691.8 per square mile (267.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.29% White, 0.14% African American, 0.34% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 1.03% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.11% of the population.

There were 2,355 households, out of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.3% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.4% were non-families. 30.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 25.5% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 23.9% from 45 to 64, and 18.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.2 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $36,225, and the median income for a family was $44,939. Males had a median income of $29,288 versus $22,281 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,569. About 5.7% of families and 8.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.5% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over.

Attractions[edit]

Holdrege is home of the Nebraska Prairie Museum.[12]

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Public Transportation, the Bus system is operated by the Phelps County Senior Center. Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides daily service through Holdrege, operating its California Zephyr daily in both directions between Chicago and Emeryville, California, across the bay from San Francisco.

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2020.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-24.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  6. ^ "Holdrege, Phelps County". Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. University of Nebraska. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  7. ^ "Profile for Holdrege, NE". ePodunk. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  8. ^ "History of Holdrege". City of Holdrege, NE. Archived from the original on 25 August 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-06-24.
  10. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved October 18, 2013.
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved October 18, 2013.
  12. ^ Nebraska Prairie Museum
  13. ^ "Carlson, Tom". Our Campaigns. December 30, 2009.
  14. ^ "Nebraska State Senators, 2009" (PDF). Nebraska State Government. 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-02-21.
  15. ^ "Primary Record" (PDF). State of California. Retrieved December 22, 2016.
  16. ^ "Barbara Granlund". Washington State Legislature. Retrieved December 22, 2016.
  17. ^ "Biography". Nebraska Legislature. Retrieved December 22, 2016.
  18. ^ "DiAnna Schimek, 1940-". Nebraska State Historical Society. January 25, 2011.

External links[edit]