Hollis Robbins

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Hollis Robbins
Hollis Robbins.jpg
Robbins in 2015
Born1963
NationalityAmerican
Academic background
Alma mater
Academic work
Institutions
Writing career
Occupation
LanguageEnglish

Hollis Robbins (born 1963[1]) is an American academic and editor. Her scholarship focuses on African-American literature.

Education[edit]

Robbins was born and raised in New Hampshire.[2][3] She entered Johns Hopkins University at the age of 16 and received her B.A. in 1983.[4] She received a master's degree in Public Policy from Harvard's Kennedy School of Government in 1990, was a doctoral student in the Department of Communication at Stanford University in 1991,[5] received an M.A. in English literature from the University of Colorado Boulder in 1998, and a Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2003.[6]

Career[edit]

From 1986 to 1988 Robbins worked at The New Yorker Magazine in the promotions department.[7] From 2004 to 2006, Robbins was an assistant professor of English at Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi.[8] She was Chair of the Department of Humanities at the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University[9] as well as the Director of the Center for Africana Studies at Johns Hopkins, from 2014 to 2017.[10] From 2014 to 2018, she served on the Faculty Editorial Board of the Johns Hopkins University Press.[11] She won the 2014 Johns Hopkins University Alumni Excellence in Teaching Award,[12] a 2015 Johns Hopkins University Discovery Award,[13] and a 2017-2018 fellowship from the National Humanities Center.[14]

Robbins is Dean of the School of Arts & Humanities at Sonoma State University in Rohnert Park, California.[15] Her research focuses on African American history and literature.[16] In 2004, she began collaborating with Henry Louis Gates Jr. and co-edited In Search of Hannah Crafts: Essays on The Bondwoman's Narrative (2004). She also co-edited The Annotated 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (2007) with Gates.[17][18] She has also written on higher education[19][20][21] as well as African American poetry[22][23] and film music.[24] She is also a published poet.[25][26][27]

Selected publications[edit]

As author[edit]

  • — (2003). "The Emperor's New Critique". New Literary History. Johns Hopkins University Press. 34 (4): 659–675. doi:10.1353/nlh.2004.0010. ISSN 1080-661X. OCLC 1296558. S2CID 170513535. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  • — (2009). "Fugitive Mail: The Deliverance of Henry 'Box' Brown and Antebellum Postal Politics" (PDF). American Studies. Spring/Summer 2009. Mid-America American Studies Association. 50 (1/2): 5–25. ISSN 0026-3079. OCLC 00818197. Archived from the original on July 18, 2019. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  • — (2014). "23. Killing Time: Dracula and Social Discoordination". In Whitman, Glen; Dow, James (eds.). Economics of the Undead: Zombies, Vampires, and the Dismal Science. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 239–248. ISBN 978-1-4422-3503-8. OCLC 1100669007. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  • — (2015). "Django Unchained: Repurposing Western Film Music". Safundi. South African and American Studies. 16 (3): 280–290. doi:10.1080/17533171.2015.1057022. ISSN 1753-3171. S2CID 143313188.
  • — (2020). Forms of Contention: Influence and the African American sonnet tradition. Athens: University of Georgia Press. ISBN 978-0-8203-5764-5. OCLC 1238066484.

As editor[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Robbins, Hollis, 1963-". The Library of Congress. Archived from the original on March 31, 2021. Retrieved February 23, 2021.
  2. ^ Robbins, Hollis. "Laundering Little Women". The American Mind. Retrieved July 8, 2021.
  3. ^ "A Song Called Life". A Song Called Life. May 5, 2021. Retrieved July 8, 2021.
  4. ^ Robbins, Hollis. "Finding Freedom from the Familiar". National Humanities Center. Archived from the original on March 31, 2021. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  5. ^ Rothman, Michael; — (1991). "Government regulation of gambling advertising: Replacing vice prevention with consumer protection". Journal of Gambling Studies. Springer Science+Business Media. 7 (4): 337–360. doi:10.1007/BF01023750. ISSN 1573-3602. OCLC 299333735. PMID 24243220. S2CID 12284985.
  6. ^ "About the Dean". School of Arts & Humanities at Sonoma State University. May 16, 2017. Archived from the original on September 6, 2019. Retrieved September 6, 2019.
  7. ^ "A Song Called Life". A Song Called Life. May 5, 2021. Retrieved July 8, 2021.
  8. ^ Parks, Casey (December 16, 2004). "Rise of the 'Religious Left'". Jackson Free Press. Archived from the original on March 31, 2021. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  9. ^ "Hollis Robbins Named 2017-18 National Humanities Center Delta Delta Delta Fellow". The Peabody Post. The Peabody Institute. April 1, 2017. Archived from the original on June 25, 2019. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  10. ^ "Hollis Robbins". Center for Africana Studies. Johns Hopkins University. April 3, 2017. Archived from the original on December 15, 2019. Retrieved May 2, 2016.
  11. ^ "The Johns Hopkins University Press - JHU Press Faculty Editorial Board". Archived from the original on May 13, 2016. Retrieved May 2, 2016.
  12. ^ "Hollis Robbins will receive JHU Alumni Association Excellence in Teaching Award". The Peabody Post. April 2, 2014. Archived from the original on May 27, 2014. Retrieved May 26, 2014.
  13. ^ "2015 Awardees". Johns Hopkins University. Archived from the original on May 3, 2017. Retrieved April 2, 2017.
  14. ^ "National Humanities Center Names Fellows for 2017-18". National Humanities Center. March 29, 2017. Archived from the original on September 6, 2019. Retrieved September 6, 2019.
  15. ^ "SSU Appoints New Dean of Arts and Humanities". Sonoma State University. June 4, 2018. Archived from the original on December 4, 2020. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  16. ^ McCabe, Bret (Winter 2017). "Talking with Hollis Robbins". Johns Hopkins Magazine. Archived from the original on July 11, 2018. Retrieved January 2, 2021.
  17. ^ Updike, John (November 29, 2006). "Down the River. The annotated 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'". The New Yorker. New York: Condé Nast. ISSN 0028-792X. OCLC 320541675. Archived from the original on January 26, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  18. ^ Rothstein, Edward (October 23, 2006). "Digging Through the Literary Anthropology of Stowe's Uncle Tom". The New York Times. New York. ISSN 1553-8095. OCLC 1645522. Archived from the original on January 27, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  19. ^ Robbins, Hollis (February 16, 2021). "Colleges should build their own social media platforms instead of relying on Facebook (opinion)". Inside Higher Ed. Archived from the original on 2021-03-01. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  20. ^ Robbins, Hollis. "A Reactionary Renaming: Stanford and English Language Politics". BLARB. Archived from the original on December 19, 2020. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  21. ^ Carson, Robert; — (November 29, 2019). "Race in America. Susan Sontag: Race, Class, and the Limits of Style". The American Interest. Vol. 15 no. 4. The American Interest LLC. ISSN 1556-5777. OCLC 180161622. Archived from the original on January 25, 2021. Retrieved March 30, 2021.
  22. ^ Robbins, Hollis. "For Maya Angelou: "The Caged Bird Sings" [by Hollis Robbins]". The Best American Poetry. Archived from the original on August 7, 2020. Retrieved February 24, 2021.
  23. ^ "Hollis Robbins at NHC". Archived from the original on April 23, 2018. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  24. ^ — (July 2016). Society for Historians of the Gilded Age & Progressive Era (United States). "U.S. History in 70 mm - The Hateful Eight (2015)". The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 15 (3): 368–370. doi:10.1017/S1537781416000074. ISSN 1537-7814. S2CID 163505610. Review of Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight
  25. ^ Robbins, Hollis. "Poetry. Hollis Robbins". Archived from the original on August 31, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2021.
  26. ^ Robbins, Hollis. "Poetry. His Paws Upon The Dish by Hollis Robbins". Archived from the original on February 23, 2015. Retrieved February 25, 2021.
  27. ^ Robbins, Hollis. "Poetry. Pond by Hollis Robbins". Archived from the original on January 21, 2020. Retrieved February 25, 2021.

External links[edit]