Holy Trinity Church, Southwell

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Coordinates: 53°04′28″N 00°57′39″W / 53.07444°N 0.96083°W / 53.07444; -0.96083

Holy Trinity Church, Southwell
Holy Trinity Church - geograph.org.uk - 852275.jpg
Denomination Church of England
Churchmanship Evangelical
Website www.holytrinitysouthwell.co.uk
History
Dedication Holy Trinity
Administration
Parish Southwell, Nottinghamshire
Diocese Southwell and Nottingham
Province York
Clergy
Vicar(s) Rev'd Andrew Porter

Holy Trinity Church, Southwell is a parish church in the Church of England in Southwell, Nottinghamshire.

The church is Grade II listed by the Department for Culture, Media & Sport[1] as it is a building of special architectural or historic interest.

History[edit]

The church was built in 1844 to 1846 by Weightman and Hadfield of Sheffield[2] in the early English style[1] It cost £2,500 to build (equivalent to £218,330 as of 2015),[3].

Incumbents[edit]

  • Revd John Connington 1846–1878
  •  ?
  • Canon Ernest Arthur Coghill 1890–1941
  •  ?
  • Canon Ian Keith Wrey Savile 1974 - 1980
  • Revd Edward Anthony Colin Cardwell 1981 - 1992
  • Canon Mark Stuart Tanner 1993 - 2013
  • Revd Andrew Porter 2013 -

Organ[edit]

The church pipe organ was built by Gray and Davison in 1867. It was restored by Bishop in 1892 and Norman and Beard in 1913. A specification of the organ as recorded in 1975 can be found on the National Pipe Organ Register.[4] The organ is no longer present.

Organists[edit]

  • Miss A.E. Calvert[5]
  • Oswald Linton ca. 1939

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ a b Historic England. "CHURCH OF HOLY TRINITY AND ATTACHED BOUNDARY WALL (1214569)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  2. ^ The Buildings of England, Nottinghamshire Nikolaus Pevsner, p333.
  3. ^ UK Consumer Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Gregory Clark (2016), "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)", MeasuringWorth.com.
  4. ^ "NPOR N13571". National Pipe Organ Register. British Institute of Organ Studies. Retrieved 2 June 2017. 
  5. ^ "Organist 45 years". Nottingham Journal. England. 10 November 1933. Retrieved 2 June 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).