Home page

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A home page of Wikipedia (as seen on August 26, 2014) is displayed in a web browser. The small house-shaped button in the upper left is for the browser's start page.

A home page (or homepage) is the main web page of a website.

The term also refers to one or more pages always shown in a web browser when the application starts up. In this case, it is also known as the start page.

The word "home" comes from the use of the Home key on a keyboard to return to the start page at any time.[1] (Home was a standard key long before the Web existed.) Many browsers also provide a button in the shape of a house for this.[2]

Website home page[edit]

A home page is generally the primary web page which a visitor navigating to a website from a search engine will see, and it may also serve as a landing page to attract visitors.[3][4] Thus good home page design is usually a high priority for a website.[5] For example, a news website may present headlines and first paragraphs of top stories, with links to full articles.[6]

In some cases, the home page is a site directory, particularly when a website has multiple home pages. Wikipedia, for example, has a site directory at wikipedia.org that links to every language-specific home page, including en.wikipedia.org.

Browser home page[edit]

When a web browser is launched, it will automatically open at least one web page. This is the browser's home page, which is also called its start page.

Start pages can be a website or a special browser page, such as thumbnails of frequently visited websites. Moreover, there is a niche market of websites intended to be used solely as start pages.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chrome keyboard shortcuts". Google. Retrieved 23 April 2021.
  2. ^ "How to Add Home Button in Browsers and Customize the Home Page?". WebNots. Retrieved 23 April 2021.
  3. ^ "Home Page as Landing Page examples - Smart Insights Digital Marketing Advice". 2014-05-23. Retrieved 2016-07-01.
  4. ^ Campbell, Jennifer (2014). Web Design: Introductory. Cengage Learning. p. 76. ISBN 978-1-305-17627-0.
  5. ^ Jakob Nielsen (12 May 2002). "Top 10 Guidelines for Homepage Usability". nngroup.com. Retrieved 4 September 2014.
  6. ^ Kalbach, James (2007). Designing Web Navigation. O'Reilly Media. p. 106. ISBN 978-0-596-55378-4.
  7. ^ Schofield, Jack (7 November 2013). "iGoogle: what are the best alternatives?". The Guardian. Retrieved 4 September 2014.