Honda CB600F

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Honda CB600F/Hornet/599
2011 CB600F
Manufacturer Honda
Also called Honda Hornet (Europe and Brazil)
Honda 599 (United States)
Production 1998–2013
Successor Honda CB650F
Class Standard
Engine 599 cc (36.6 cu in)
Related Honda CB900F
Honda CBR600F3
Honda CBR600RR

The Honda CB600F (known as the Hornet in Europe and Brazil and 599 in the U.S.) is a standard motorcycle manufactured by Honda.[1][2][3] It is powered by a 599 cc (36.6 cu in) liquid-cooled inline-four engine, originally a detuned version of that in the Honda CBR600 sport bike, which currently produces around 102 bhp (76 kW). The 'Hornet' name was not taken to North America as AMC had trademarked the name with the AMC Hornet.The Hornet comes in models:160, 250, 600 & 900.

History[edit]

Honda CB650F
Honda CB 650 F.jpg
Manufacturer Honda
Production 2014-present
Predecessor CB600F
Class Standard
Engine 648.7 cc (39.6 cu in)
Related Honda CBR650F

The Honda CB600F Hornet was introduced for Europe in 1998, although a 250 cc version has existed as a home-market only version since 1994. The bike has a six-speed transmission. Its suspension consists of a front telescopic fork and a rear single shock. Its brakes are dual-disc, twin piston in the front and single-disc, single pot in the rear. It was given the 16 in (410 mm) diameter front wheel and 17 in (430 mm), 180 section rear wheel setup from the Fireblade.

As a sport-oriented motorcycle that provides an upright riding position, it is considered a standard or "naked bike".

In 2000 Honda updated the Hornet, changing the 16 in (410 mm) front wheel for a 17 in (430 mm) to help corner stability and increasing the strength of the brake pass-over system on the front, making the brakes stronger. However, Honda did not increase the size of the fuel tank. A faired version, the CB600FS, was also introduced in 2000.

In 2003 Honda gave the CB600F version a make-over, with a larger fuel tank (17 L or 3.7 imp gal or 4.5 US gal as opposed to the former 16 L or 3.5 imp gal or 4.2 US gal), and 'sharper' styling. The CB600S faired version was discontinued.

In 2005 the instrument cluster was modernised, and more importantly, it was fitted with inverted front forks, to improve road-holding and cornering stability.

Honda took the Hornet to the United States and Canadian market for the 2004 and 2006 model years. It was called the 599.

The highly revised CB600F model came out in April 2007. The engine of the new motorcycle is a detuned version of the engine available in the 2007 CBR600RR giving a maximum output power of approximately 102 bhp (76 kW).

In 2011, the model got a facelift. The headlight assembly was changed and the instrument cluster uses LCD display. This bike shared many of the same components – swingarm, fork, frame, engine – as the Honda CBR600F that was reintroduced in 2011.[4][5]

In 2014 the model received a major update and got a displacement increase of 49 cc, the new model is called CB650F.[6]

Specifications[edit]

1998-1999 2000-2002 2003-2006 2007–2013 2014–present
Engine
Engine Type 599 cc (36.6 cu in) liquid-cooled inline four-cylinder 648.7 cc (39.6 cu in) liquid-cooled 4-stroke 16-valve DOHC inline-4
Bore/Stroke 65.0 mm × 45.2 mm (2.56 in × 1.78 in) 67.0 mm × 42.5 mm (2.64 in × 1.67 in) 67.0 mm × 46.0 mm (2.6 in × 1.8 in)
Compression Ratio 12.0:1 11.4:1
Max Power Output 94.69 bhp (70.61 kW) at 12,000 rpm 94 bhp (70 kW) at 12,000 rpm 96.5 bhp (72.0 kW) at 12,000 rpm 102 bhp (76 kW) at 12,000 rpm 85 hp (63.4 kW) @ 11,000 rpm
Max Torque 62.76 Nm at 9,500 rpm 61.78 Nm at 10,000 rpm 63 Nm at 10,000 rpm 63.5 Nm at 10,500 rpm 63 N·m (46.5 lb·ft) @ 8,000 rpm
Valve Train DOHC; four valves per cylinder
Carburetion Four 34.0 mm (1.34 in) slanted flat-slide CV PGM-FI electronic fuel injection PGM-FI electronic fuel injection
Ignition Computer-controlled digital with electronic advance Computer-controlled digital transistorised with electronic advance
Drivetrain
Transmission Six-speed
Final Drive #525 O-ring-sealed chain
Chassis/Suspension/Brakes
Front Suspension 41 mm (1.6 in) telescopic fork; 125 mm (4.9 in) travel 41 mm (1.6 in) telescopic fork; 120 mm (4.7 in) travel 41 mm (1.6 in) inverted telescopic fork 41 mm (1.6 in) Telescopic fork; 109.2 mm (4.3 in) travel
Rear Suspension Single shock with seven-position spring-preload adjustability; 128 mm (5.0 in) travel Single shock with spring-preload adjustability; 127.0 mm (5.0 in) travel
Front Brakes Dual full-floating 296 mm (11.7 in) discs with twin-piston calipers. ABS optional. Two-piston calipers with dual 320 mm (12.6 in) discs
Rear Brakes Single 220 mm (8.7 in) disc with single-piston caliper. ABS optional. Single 240 mm (9.4 in) disc with single-piston caliper. ABS optional. Single-caliper 240 mm (9.4 in) disc
Front Tire 130/70ZR16 120/70ZR-17 radial
Rear Tire 180/55ZR-17 radial
Dimensions
Rake 25.5 degrees 25 degrees 25.5°
Trail 96.0 mm (3.78 in) 99.0 mm (3.90 in) 101.3 mm (4.0 in)
Wheelbase 1,419.86 mm (55.900 in) 1,424.94 mm (56.100 in) 1,419.86 mm (55.900 in) 1,435.1 mm (56.50 in) 1,450 mm (57.1 in)
Seat Height 789.94 mm (31.100 in) 800.1 mm (31.50 in) 810 mm (31.9 in)
Dry Weight 183.25 kg (404.0 lb) 172.82 kg (381.0 lb) 208 kg (458.6 lb)
Fuel Capacity 16 L (3.5 imp gal; 4.2 US gal) 17 L (3.7 imp gal; 4.5 US gal) 19 L (4.2 imp gal; 5.0 US gal) 17.3 L (4.6 US gal)
Model ID CB600F (EU)
599 (US)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hill, Geoff (2010-01-31), "TRY THIS NAKED BEAUTY, VIRGIN RIDERS. Yamaha's stripped-down XJ6 is ideal for beginners to build up their confidence on", Sunday Times, London (UK), p. 8, retrieved 2010-12-26 
  2. ^ Anonymous (Apr 21, 2010), "Spring deals on Honda's range", Cornish Guardian, Truro (UK), p. 31 
  3. ^ "Honda CB600F Hornet: A dashingly styled machine", Belfast Telegraph, Belfast, p. 1, Mar 7, 2007 
  4. ^ Ets-Hokin, Gabe (November 18, 2010). "What You Can’t Have: 2011 Honda CBR600F". Motorcycle Daily.com. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  5. ^ Falconer, Mel (June 17, 2011). "Road Test: 2011 Honda CBR600F ABS and 2004 Honda CBR600F - Sibling rivalry". Motorcycle Monthly. Retrieved September 11, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Specifications". Honda. Honda. Retrieved 1 August 2016. 

External links[edit]