Honda CB77

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Honda CB77
Honda Superhawk 305cc CB77 1965. Light years ahead of anything else. Those were the great days of early Japanese bikes,even if I preferred the earlier Super Dream - Flickr - mick - Lumix.jpg
Manufacturer Honda
Also called Super Hawk, Honda 305
Production 1961–1968[1]
Successor CB350
Class Standard, sport bike
Engine 305 cc (18.6 cu in) OHC straight-twin, 2 × 26 mm Keihin carburetors
kick and electric start
Bore / stroke 60.0 mm × 54.0 mm (2.36 in × 2.13 in)
Compression ratio 9.5:1
Top speed 168.3 km/h (104.6 mph)[2]
Power 28 hp (21 kW) @ 9,000 rpm[3][2]
Ignition type Battery and coil
Transmission Multi-disc wet clutch, 4 speed, chain drive
Frame type Tubular steel
Suspension Front: telescopic fork
Rear: swingarm
Brakes Drum, 41 sq in (260 cm2) area
Tires Front 2.75×18 in.
Rear: 3.00×18 in.
Wheelbase 1,300 mm (51.0 in)
Seat height 760 mm (30.0 in)
Weight 159 kg (351 lb) (wet)
Fuel capacity 14 l; 3.0 imp gal (3.6 US gal)
Related C77, CL77. Honda Dream CB250

The Honda CB77, or Super Hawk, was a 305 cc (18.6 cu in) straight-twin motorcycle produced from 1961 until 1967. It is remembered today as Honda's first sport bike. It is a landmark model in Honda's advances in Western motorcycle markets of the 1960s,[4] for its speed and power as well as its reliability, and is regarded as one of the bikes that set the paradigm for modern motorcycles.

Characteristics[edit]

The CB77 had, at only 305cc, a relatively big engine in comparison to most other Japanese bikes of the period, although it had performance to rival much larger motorcycles from other countries.[citation needed] It quickly built a reputation for reliability, and was equipped with luxuries such as an electric starter.[3]

The CB77 was built on the experience Honda had gained in Grand Prix racing, and differed greatly from previous models.[which?] It had a steel-tube frame instead of the pressed frames of earlier Hondas,[5] and a telescopic front fork.[1] The parallel twin engine, the biggest then available in a Honda, was an integral element of the bike's structure, providing stiffness in a frame that had no downtube, and was capable of 9,000 rpm. It could propel the bike at over 100 mph; as fast as British parallel twins with higher displacements, and with great reliability. Cycle World tested its average two-way top speed at 168.3 km/h (104.6 mph), and its acceleration from 0 to 14 mi (0.00 to 0.40 km) in 16.8 seconds at 83 mph (134 km/h).[2]

Author Aaron Frank called it, "the first modern Japanese motorcycle... that established the motorcycle paradigm that we still operate under now, more than forty years later."[5]

Related bikes[edit]

Honda also produced a lower-powered 247 cc (15.1 cu in) version called the CB72 Hawk, which otherwise had the same specifications. In 1962, Honda introduced an off-road bike, the CL72 250 Scrambler, with the same engine as the Hawk but with a different, full-cradle frame with a skid plate and other adjustments for off-road use. In 1965, the CL77 305 Scrambler appeared, with the bigger engine of the Super Hawk but otherwise similar to the CL72.[5]

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance[edit]

Robert M. Pirsig rode a CB77 Super Hawk on the trip he made with his son and their friends in 1968 on a two month round trip from their home in St. Paul, Minnesota to Petaluma, California, which became the basis for the novel Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values.[6][3][7] The novel never mentions the make or model of Pirsig's motorcycle,[8] but does discuss their companions, John and Sylvia Sutherland's, new BMW, an R60/2.[9] The R60/2, prized for its place in motorcycle literature, has changed hands and is still regularly ridden, while Pirsig was, as of 2007, still the owner of his CB77 Super Hawk.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mitchel, Doug (2005). Honda Motorcycles: Everything You Need to Know About Every Honda Motorcycle Ever Built. Krause. pp. 18–19. ISBN 9780873499668. Retrieved 5 December 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c Cycle World Road Test: Honda Super Hawk 1 (5), Newport Beach, California: Hachette Filipacchi Media U.S.  – via Bondi Digital Publishing (subscription required), May 1962, pp. 8–11, ISSN 0011-4286 
  3. ^ a b c Gingerelli, Dain; Everitt, Charles; Michels, James Manning (2011), 365 Motorcycles You Must Ride, MBI Publishing Company, p. 126, ISBN 0-7603-3474-9, retrieved 2011-04-06 
  4. ^ Schilling, Phil. "The hawk above, the crud below." Cycle World Apr. 1999: 72+. General OneFile. Web. 6 Apr. 2011.
  5. ^ a b c Frank, Aaron (2003-05-01). Honda Motorcycles. MotorBooks International. p. 59. ISBN 9780760310779. Retrieved 5 December 2012. 
  6. ^ Mehren, Elizabeth (11 October 1991), "Zen and Now : Robert M. Pirsig rode a 'Motorcycle' to fame. He's back with a bleaker tale of troubled times", Los Angeles Times: 1, retrieved 2011-04-06 
  7. ^ Paul Crowe (2006), "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance Photos", The Kneeslider 
  8. ^ Pirsig, Robert M. (1974), Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance (1984 reprint ed.), Bantam Books, ISBN 0-553-27747-2 
  9. ^ Richardson, Mark (2008), Zen and now: on the trail of Robert Pirsig and Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance, Random House, p. 5, ISBN 0-307-26970-1, retrieved 2011-04-06 
  10. ^ Wasef, Basem; Leno, Jay (2007), Legendary Motorcycles: The Stories and Bikes Made Famous by Elvis, Peter Fonda, Kenny Roberts and Other Motorcycling Greats, MotorBooks International, p. 165, ISBN 0-7603-3070-0, retrieved 2011-04-06