Hong Myung-bo

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Hong Myung-bo
홍명보
Hong Myung-Bo.jpg
Hong in 2013
Personal information
Full name Hong Myung-bo
Date of birth (1969-02-12) 12 February 1969 (age 51)
Place of birth Seoul, South Korea
Height 1.81 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Playing position(s) Sweeper
Youth career
1987–1990 Korea University
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1991 Sangmu FC (draft)
1992–1997 Pohang Steelworks 110 (14)
1997–1998 Bellmare Hiratsuka 42 (0)
1999–2001 Kashiwa Reysol 72 (7)
2002 Pohang Steelers 19 (0)
2003–2004 LA Galaxy 38 (0)
Total 281 (21)
National team
2000 South Korea U23 (WC) 1 (0)
1991[1] South Korea Universiade
1990–2002 South Korea 136 (10)
Teams managed
2009 South Korea U20
2009–2012 South Korea U23
2013–2014 South Korea
2016–2017 Hangzhou Greentown
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only
Hong Myung-bo
Hangul
홍명보
Hanja
洪明甫
Revised RomanizationHong Myeong-bo
McCune–ReischauerHong Myŏng-bo

Hong Myung-bo (Korean: 홍명보, Hanja: 洪明甫; Korean pronunciation: [hoŋmjʌŋbo]; born 12 February 1969) is a South Korean former footballer and former manager. A former sweeper, Hong is often considered one of the greatest Asian footballers of all time.[2] Hong was a member of the South Korean national team in four FIFA World Cups, and was the first Asian player to play in four consecutive World Cup final tournaments. He was the first Asian player who received the Bronze Ball at the World Cup.[3] He was also the only two Asian players, chosen among the FIFA 100, Pelé's selection about the 125 greatest living footballers in the world, with a Japanese midfielder Hidetoshi Nakata.[4]

International career[edit]

Hong was named in the South Korea squad for the 1990 FIFA World Cup just four months after his international debut.[5] The youngest South Korean player who participated in the tournament, he played in all three games of the group stage, and received the most praise in South Korea, although they lost all group matches.[6][7] He was also selected as a member of the South Korea Universiade team for the 1991 Summer Universiade.[1] Scoring a goal in the first match against Algeria,[8] he helped them advance to the final by stabilizing the defense of the team.[9] After drawing the final with the Netherlands without a goal, he succeed to score the first shot of South Korea in the penalty shoot-out, and finally won a gold medal.[10]

His talent was most notable during the group stage of the 1994 FIFA World Cup. When South Korea had only five minutes to catch up Spain, who was leading the match with the score of 2–0, he scored the first goal outside the penalty area, and assisted his teammate Seo Jung-won to score the equalizer goal shortly after, making the match a memorable draw against Spain.[11] In the match that took place two weeks later, South Korea was losing during the first half with the score of 3–0 against the defending champions Germany, represented by numerous skillful players including two Ballon d'Or winners Lothar Matthäus and Matthias Sammer.[12] After South Korean striker Hwang Sun-hong struck their first goal into the net, he scored the second goal himself with a long-range shot, but that was the last goal of the match.[13]

He participated in the 1994 Asian Games after the World Cup, but he injured his knee during the quarter-final match against Japan.[14] South Korea lost to Uzbekistan in the semi-finals after he quit the tournament. When Park Jong-hwan managed the South Korea squad, Hong was in conflict with Park who had a coercive disposition, and was criticized for forming his faction in the national team.[15] He was also doubted whether he played the game lazily after South Korea lost 6–2 to Iran in the quarter-finals of the 1996 AFC Asian Cup.[16] At the 1998 FIFA World Cup in France, South Korea was eliminated at the first round with one draw and two losses. He didn't prevent team's 5–0 loss in the second game against the Netherlands.[17] He was selected as an over-aged player by the South Korea under-23 for the 2000 Summer Olympics, but he was injured just before the tournament, and replaced by Kang Chul.[18]

Hong captained South Korea to a historic fourth-place finish in the 2002 FIFA World Cup. He scored the winning penalty to secure a 5–3 shootout victory in the quarter final against Spain after a goalless draw. The Technical Study Group voted him as the third best player of the tournament, the Bronze Ball winner, so he became the first ever Asian player to be named in the top three players at a World Cup. Leader of the Korean defensive trio alongside Kim Tae-young and Choi Jin-cheul, he ended his international career after a 2002 friendly match against World Cup champions Brazil as the all-time leader in appearances for the South Korea national team, with 136 caps.[19]

Style of play[edit]

Hong didn't have rapid pace, untiring stamina and outstanding ability about man-to-man defense, but he had wide vision and great leadership, which control the other defenders.[20][21][22] An offensive sweeper, he was noted for his accurate long-range passing skills which also largely contributed to South Korea's attack.[23] He was nicknamed the "Eternal Libero" by South Korean media, and became the icon of South Korean football in his era.[24]

Managerial career[edit]

On 26 September 2005, after his retirement as a player, Hong returned to the national team as assistant coach. Helping the manager Dick Advocaat, he took part in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, and worked with the next manager Pim Verbeek in the 2007 AFC Asian Cup. After the resignation of Verbeek, he was one of the candidates to become the next manager.

The Korean FA announced that it had appointed him as the South Korea under-20 team, on 19 February 2009. Under his guidance the team reached the quarter-finals of the 2009 FIFA U-20 World Cup, but were eliminated due to a 3–2 defeat to Ghana, the eventual champions.

Hong also served an assistant coach for South Korea under-23 team under Park Sung-hwa. In October 2009, he took over the coaching duties at under-23 team. He led his team into third place in the 2010 Asian Games. On 10 August 2012, Hong Myung-bo coached the men's Olympic team to a 2-0 win over Japan to secure the bronze medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics, which set up a record by obtaining the first medal ever for South Korea in Olympic football as well as being the first Asian team in 44 years to win a medal at that event.[25]

He was named as assistant manager to Guus Hiddink at Anzhi Makhachkala in August 2012. After Choi Kang-hee, the former head coach of South Korea, took the responsibility of the team's poor performance in 2014 FIFA World Cup qualification and resigned from his position, Hong Myung-bo was appointed as the new head coach of the team on 24 June 2013 to prepare the team for the 2014 FIFA World Cup. After a winless World Cup campaign, Hong resigned from his post on 10 July 2014.

Personal life[edit]

Hong married Cho Soo-mi, who was five years younger than him, in 1997. He has two sons, Hong Seong-min and Hong Jeong-min. One of them is currently attending Korea International School. Hong also has two younger siblings. Hong is known for his reticence and charisma.[26]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

Source:[27]

Club Season League National Cup League Cup Continental Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Sangmu FC (draft) 1991 Semi-pro League [a] [b]
Pohang Steelworks 1992 K League 29 1 8 0 37 1
1993 K League 11 1 1 0 12 1
1994 K League 17 4 0 0 17 4
1995 K League 24 1 7 0 31 1
1996 K League 29 7 [c] 5 0 [d] 34 7
1997 K League 0 0 [c] 6 0 [d] 6 0
Total 110 14 27 0 137 14
Bellmare Hiratsuka 1997 J1 League 10 0 3 1 0 0 13 1
1998 J1 League 32 0 2 0 0 0 34 0
Total 42 0 5 1 0 0 47 1
Kashiwa Reysol 1999 J1 League 28 5 4 2 5 2 37 9
2000 J1 League 29 2 2 0 2 0 33 2
2001 J1 League 15 0 0 0 3 0 18 0
Total 72 7 6 2 10 2 88 11
Pohang Steelers 2002 K League 19 0 [c] 0 0 19 0
LA Galaxy 2003 MLS 25 0 2 0 [e] 27 0
2004 MLS 13 0 0 0 13 0
Total 38 0 2 0 40 0
Career total 281 21 13 3 37 2 331 26
  1. ^ Appearance(s) in Korean National Championship and Korean President's Cup
  2. ^ Appearance(s) in Korean Semi-professional Championship
  3. ^ a b c Appearance(s) in Korean FA Cup
  4. ^ a b Appearance(s) in Asian Club Championship
  5. ^ Appearance(s) in CONCACAF Champions' Cup

International[edit]

Source:[28]

National team Year Apps Goals
South Korea U23 2000 1 0
South Korea 1990 20 2
1991 1 0
1992 3 1
1993 18 2
1994 14 4
1995 5 0
1996 16 1
1997 12 0
1998 8 0
1999 5 0
2000 11 0
2001 7 0
2002 16 0
Total 136 10
Career total 137 10

International goals[edit]

Results list South Korea's goal tally first.
No. Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 3 August 1990 Beijing, China  China PR 1 goal 1–1 (6–5 PSO) 1990 Dynasty Cup
2. 23 September 1990 Beijing, China  Singapore 1 goal 7–0 1990 Asian Games
3. 24 August 1992 Beijing, China  North Korea 1 goal 1–1 1992 Dynasty Cup
4. 13 May 1993 Beirut, Lebanon  India 1 goal 3–0 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification
5. 19 October 1993 Doha, Qatar  Iraq 1 goal 2–2 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification
6. 5 June 1994 Boston, United States  Ecuador 1 goal 1–2 Friendly match
7. 17 June 1994 Dallas, United States  Spain 1 goal 2–2 1994 FIFA World Cup
8. 27 June 1994 Dallas, United States  Germany 1 goal 2–3 1994 FIFA World Cup
9. 11 September 1994 Gangneung, South Korea  Ukraine 1 goal 1–0 Friendly match
10. 8 August 1996 Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  Chinese Taipei 1 goal 4–0 1996 AFC Asian Cup qualification

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Sangmu FC

Pohang Steelworks

Kashiwa Reysol

South Korea Universiade

South Korea

Individual

Manager[edit]

South Korea U23

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c 체육계 쪽지. Naver.com (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 19 May 1991.
  2. ^ "Hong Myung-Bo strongest candidate for South Korea post". Goal. 19 June 2013. Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Awards". FIFA. Retrieved 29 July 2018.
  4. ^ a b "The Fifa 100". The Guardian. 4 March 2004.
  5. ^ 월드컵 축구팀 22명 최종확정. Naver.com (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 30 May 1990. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  6. ^ 崔순호·洪명보 두명만 뛰었다. Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 13 June 1990. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  7. ^ Han, Hong-ki (22 June 1990). 마지막30초 虚찔렸지만 잘싸웠다. Naver.com (in Korean). Dong-A Ilbo. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  8. ^ 한국축구 順風예보. Naver.com (in Korean). Dong-A Ilbo. 15 July 1991. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  9. ^ 한국축구 U대회 "진군나팔". Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 23 July 1991. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  10. ^ 궂은 비 맞으며 활활 타오른 투혼 한국축구 유니버시아드制覇. Naver.com (in Korean). Dong-A Ilbo. 25 July 1991. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  11. ^ 한국"「16强」보인다". Naver.com (in Korean). Dong-A Ilbo. 19 June 1994. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  12. ^ "GERMANY 3-2 KOREA REPUBLIC". FIFA. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  13. ^ 94월드컵 한국 후회없이 싸웠다. Naver.com (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 29 June 1994. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  14. ^ 「월드컵 스타」황선홍이 해냈다. Naver.com (in Korean). Dong-A Ilbo. 12 October 1994. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  15. ^ 축구계「열하나회」있다. Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 17 December 1996. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  16. ^ Jeong, Hee-jun (8 July 2013). 기성용 전에는 홍명보가 있었다…"그러다 다친" 감독들 (in Korean). Pressian. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  17. ^ 전술도 투지도 없었다 한국,최악의 수모. Naver.com (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 22 June 1998. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  18. ^ [런던2012]런던서 '올림픽 恨' 푼 홍명보 감독 (in Korean). JoongAng Ilbo. 11 August 2012. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  19. ^ Jiang, Allan (5 August 2012). "South Korea 2002 FIFA World Cup Retrospective". Bleacher Report. Retrieved 23 March 2018.
  20. ^ 공수핵 홍명보 약점보강 열쇠. Naver.com (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 6 December 1996. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  21. ^ [월드컵] 홍명보 수비라인복귀, `천군만마' (in Korean). Korea Economic Daily. 1 June 2002. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  22. ^ [홍의택의 대담] 아시아의 리베로가 말한다, '한국 중앙 수비수' (in Korean). Sportalkorea. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  23. ^ 「홍명보 공백」못메우고 공-수서 몰락. Naver.com (in Korean). Dong-A Ilbo. 2 November 1997. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  24. ^ '영원한 리베로' 홍명보, 24년 대표팀 영욕의 역사 (in Korean). JoongAng Ilbo. 10 July 2014. Retrieved 17 May 2020.
  25. ^ "South Korea blanks Japan for men's soccer bronze – CBC Sports". CBC Sports. Retrieved 23 March 2018.
  26. ^ 국가대표 복귀문제로 논란 이는 한국축구 간판스타 홍명보·조수미 부부 (in Korean). W Dong-A. Archived from the original on 23 September 2015. Retrieved 22 August 2012.
  27. ^ #20 홍명보 (in Korean). K League. Retrieved 27 June 2019.
  28. ^ "Myung-Bo Hong – Century of International Appearances". RSSSF. Retrieved 23 March 2018.
  29. ^ 포철 홍명보 '올해의 선수'뽑혀 (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 4 December 1992.
  30. ^ 올 최우수선수 홍명보 (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 6 December 1992.
  31. ^ 「적토마」고정운 MVP영예 (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 20 November 1994.
  32. ^ 신태용 올 축구 황금발 (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 24 November 1995.
  33. ^ 프로축구 MVP 김현석 뽑혀 (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 30 November 1996.
  34. ^ 2002년 K-리그 시상식 21일 개최 (in Korean). Yonhap. 20 December 2002.
  35. ^ "FIFA XI´s Matches – Full Info". RSSSF. 20 October 2015.
  36. ^ "Asian Player of the Year". RSSSF. 18 January 2018.
  37. ^ アジアカップ2000・レバノン大会 (in Japanese). WorldCup's world. Retrieved 15 June 2020.
  38. ^ Jリーグ 歴代のMVP・ベストイレブン・得点王 (in Japanese). ULTRAZONE. 5 December 2017.
  39. ^ "2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan: Report and Statistics" (PDF). FIFA.
  40. ^ "FIFA World player 2002 Elected by 148 managers of national teams". European Football Statistics.
  41. ^ 한국 축구 레전드 베스트11 발표 (in Korean). YTN. 31 May 2013.
  42. ^ Johnston, Patrick (21 November 2014). Peter Rutherford (ed.). "Kewell, Hong, Daei among AFC's first Hall of Fame inductees". Reuters. Retrieved 21 November 2014.

External links[edit]