Hoodoo Ann

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Hoodoo Ann
Screen Acting 1921 page 95 Mae Marsh Hoodoo Ann.png
Mae Marsh in scene from film
Directed by Lloyd Ingraham
Produced by D. W. Griffith
Written by D. W. Griffith (screenplay)
Starring Mae Marsh
Robert Harron
William H. Brown
Wilbur Higby
Loyola O'Connor
Mildred Harris
Distributed by Triangle Film Corporation
Release dates
  • March 26, 1916 (1916-03-26)
Running time
64 minutes
Country United States
Language Silent film
English intertitles

Hoodoo Ann is a 1916 American comedy-drama silent film, written by D.W. Griffith, directed by Lloyd Ingraham and released by Triangle Film Corporation.


Ann (Mae Marsh) is a young girl who has been living in an orphanage since infancy. She is disliked and spurned by the other children, and treated coldly by the orphanage administrators—the reason for this, however, is unclear. She is told by the orphanage cook Black Cindy (Madame Sul-Te-Wan) during a palm-reading that she will be cursed until she is married. Ann's stay at the orphanage is an endless series of unhappy circumstances; she steals a doll belonging to a popular girl named Goldie (Mildred Harris), then accidentally breaks the doll, thereby adding to her loneliness and misery. One day, while the children are napping, a fire breaks out in the orphanage and Ann heroically saves Goldie from the flames.

Impressed with Ann's selflessness, a kindly couple, Samuel and Elinor Knapp (Wilbur Higby and Loyola O'Connor) take her in and later adopt Ann. Ann immediately becomes smitten with a neighbor boy named Jimmie Vance (Robert Harron) and the two youths begin courting. Believing that her "curse" is coming to an end, Ann attends a motion picture with Jimmie. Enthralled by the action-filled western film she had witnessed, the following day Ann is inspired to imitate the film's main character Pansy Thorne while playing with a gun. Unbeknownst to Ann, the gun is loaded and a round goes off and the stray bullet enters a neighbor's house. Ann tentatively peers through the window and is shocked to see her neighbor, Bill Higgins (Charles Lee) lying on the floor. Believing she killed Mr. Higgins, Ann is despondent, sure that the curse is still upon her and fearful that Jimmie will never marry her now that she has committed murder.

After tearfully confessing to her "crime" and a subsequent investigation into the peculiar disappearance of the body of Mr. Higgins, the town is shocked when Mr. Higgins returns home several days later and reveals that he had simply left town to avoid his wife's incessant nagging. Overjoyed, Jimmie and Ann marry and the "hoodoo" is lifted. But the wedding ceremony is not entirely a happy affair; Ann appears distracted and pensive throughout, leaving the viewer to wonder if she perhaps believes that the curse is still upon her.[1]


Role Actor
Hoodoo Ann Mae Marsh
Jimmie Vance Robert Harron
Wilson Vance William H. Brown
Samuel Knapp Wilbur Higby
Elinor Knapp Loyola O'Connor
Goldie Mildred Harris
Miss Prudence Scraggs Pearl Elmore
Sarah Higgins Anna Dodge
Bill Higgins Charles Lee
Officer Lambert Elmo Lincoln
Constable Drake Carl Stockdale
Black Cindy Madame Sul-Te-Wan


External links[edit]