Hook

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Fish hooks are pointed and barbed at one end to aid in catching fish.
A grappling hook has multiple hooks from a central anchor, to increase the chances of catching a part of a surface that the hook can hold.
A hook-and-eye clasp is composed of two pieces that are sewn to clothing, for which one is able to hook around the other.

A hook is a tool consisting of a length of material that contains a portion that is curved or indented, so that this portion can be used to hold another object. In a number of uses, one end of the hook is pointed, so that this end can pierce another material, which is then held by the curved or indented portion.

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  1. ^ Unger-Hamilton, Romana (July 1985). "Microscopic Striations on Flint Sickle-Blades as an Indication of Plant Cultivation: Preliminary Results". World Archaeology. 17 (1): 121–6. doi:10.1080/00438243.1985.9979955. 
  2. ^ Banning, E.B. (1998). "The Neolithic Period: Triumphs of Architecture, Agriculture, and Art". Near Eastern Archaeology. 61 (4): 188–237. JSTOR 3210656. doi:10.2307/3210656. 
  3. ^ Beazley, Elisabeth (1990). Beazley's Design and Detail of the Space Between Buildings. Taylor & Francis. p. 230. ISBN 978-0-419-13620-0. 
  4. ^ Porter, Brian; Christopher Tooke (2007). Carpentry and Joinery 3. Butterworth-Heinemann. p. 200. ISBN 978-0-7506-6505-6.