Hope Vale, Queensland

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Hope Vale
Queensland
Hope Vale, Cape York Peninsula, Australia
Hope Vale
Hope Vale is located in Queensland
Hope Vale
Hope Vale
Coordinates15°17′46″S 145°06′43″E / 15.2962°S 145.1119°E / -15.2962; 145.1119 (Hope Vale (town centre))Coordinates: 15°17′46″S 145°06′43″E / 15.2962°S 145.1119°E / -15.2962; 145.1119 (Hope Vale (town centre))
Population1,015 (2016 census locality)[1]
 • Density0.48597/km2 (1.2587/sq mi)
Postcode(s)4895
Area2,088.6 km2 (806.4 sq mi)
Time zoneAEST (UTC+10:00)
Location
LGA(s)
State electorate(s)Cook
Federal Division(s)Leichhardt
Localities around Hope Vale:
Starcke Starcke Lizard
Cooktown Hope Vale Coral Sea
Cooktown Cooktown Coral Sea
Kids at Hope Vale Art Centre Opening. April, 2009
Hope Vale Art Centre Opening April, 2009

Hope Vale (also known as Hopevale) is a town within the Aboriginal Shire of Hope Vale and a coastal locality split between the Aboriginal Shire of Hope Vale and the Shire of Cook, both in Queensland, Australia.[2][3][4] It is an Aboriginal community. In the 2016 census the locality of Hope Vale had a population of 1,015 people.[1]

Geography[edit]

Hope Vale is on Cape York Peninsula about 46 kilometres (29 mi) northwest of Cooktown by road, and about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) off the Battlecamp Road that leads to Lakefield National Park and Laura.

History[edit]

Guugu Yimithirr (also known as Koko Yindjir, Gugu Yimidhirr, Guguyimidjir) is an Australian Aboriginal language of Hope Vale and the Cooktown area. The language region includes the local government area of the Aboriginal Shire of Hope Vale and the Shire of Cook, particularly the localities of Cape Bedford, Battle Camp and sections of the Normanby River and Annan River.[5]

The Cape Bedford Mission was established by Johann Flierl, a missionary of the Lutheran Church in 1886, with the settlement at Elim on the beach.

Owing to fears that the German-influenced Aboriginal people might cooperate with the advancing Japanese in World War II, the total population of 286 was evacuated south to various communities by the military in May 1942. The German Lutheran missionaries were sent to internment camps. Most of the people were sent to Woorabinda, near Rockhampton, in Queensland, where a large number reportedly perished from disease and malnutrition.[6] Hope Vale was re-established as a Lutheran mission in September 1949. Aboriginal people from the Hope Valley and Cape Bedford Missions settled there. A work crew was allowed to return in 1949 and the first families came home in 1950. Hopevale Post Office opened on 1 May 1965 and closed in 1990.[7]

Hopevale is no longer run as a mission by the church but by its own elected community council. In 1986 it received a "deed of grant in trust" (DOGIT) which "granted title to 110,000 ha of land which was previously Aboriginal Reserve Land held by the Under Secretary as trustee, to the community council to act as trustees of the land for the benefit of the residents."[8] The Aboriginal Land Act 1991 (Qld) transferred into Indigenous ownership all previous reserve land under DOGIT (Deed of Grant in Trust) titles.[9]

"The Warra people of the Hopevale Community of Eastern Cape York Peninsula in Queensland received acknowledgement of their native title rights in December 1997. The determination recognised rights of exclusive possession, occupation use and enjoyment over 110,000 ha. (Native Title Determination, Warra Peoples, Hope Vale Community of Cape York (NNTT ref# QC96/15))"[10]

Hopevale is home to several clan groups who mostly speak Guugu Yimidhirr and other related languages, as well as English.

Due to a lack of reliable water supplies at Elim, the community was shifted about 20 kilometres (12 mi) inland to its present site.

On 21 July 2008 the Hope Vale community opened the Indigenous Knowledge and Technology Centre (IKTC), in the Jack Bambie building at 5 Muni Street. This centre provides a library service, training venue and public Internet access.[11] The Hope Vale community has a strong choral singing tradition since its evacuation to Woorabinda. The ensemble has performed at the Queensland Music Festival on three occasions—in 2005, 2007 and 2009.

At the 2011 census, Hopevale had a population of 974 people.[12]

In the 2016 census the locality of Hope Vale had a population of 1,015 people.[1]

Education[edit]

Hope Vale has a primary (Prep-6) campus of Cape York Aboriginal Australian Academy, which is headquartered at the corner of Thiele and Poland Streets in Cairns (15°17′43″S 145°06′29″E / 15.2952°S 145.1080°E / -15.2952; 145.1080 (Hopevale Campus of CYAAA)).[13][14]

There is no secondary school in Hope Vale. The nearest secondary school is Cooktown State School in neighbouring Cooktown to the south.[15]

Notable people[edit]

  • lawyer and activist Noel Pearson, who has criticised the level of violence in the community.[16]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Hope Vale (SSC)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 20 October 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Hope Vale – town (entry 16117)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  3. ^ "Hope Vale – locality in Aboriginal Shire of Hope Vale (entry 45790)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  4. ^ "Hope Vale – locality in Shire of Cook (entry 45790)". Queensland Place Names. Queensland Government. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  5. ^ CC-BY-icon-80x15.png This Wikipedia article incorporates CC-BY-4.0 licensed text from: "Guugu Yimithirr". Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages map. State Library of Queensland. Retrieved 28 January 2020.
  6. ^ Hope Vale features in WWII documentary Archived 1 February 2017 at the Wayback Machine. LCA Communications, Lutheran Church of Australia, 4 April 2015
  7. ^ Premier Postal History. "Post Office List". Premier Postal Auctions. Archived from the original on 15 May 2014. Retrieved 10 May 2014.
  8. ^ Pearson, N. "The Deed of Grant in Trust and Hope Vale Aboriginal Community, North Queensland". Archived from the original on 16 May 2017. Retrieved 19 March 2018. (1989) 1(38) Aboriginal Law Bulletin 12.
  9. ^ "Aboriginals & Torres Strait Islanders - Legislation - Queensland". WorldLII. Archived from the original on 4 August 2008.
  10. ^ Strelein, Lisa. "Mabo/Hopevale & Aboriginal Land, 1997". mabonativetitle.com. Archived from the original on 14 July 2011.
  11. ^ "Hope Vale (Jack Bambie Memorial Centre)". plconnect.slq.qld.gov.au. State Library of Queensland. Archived from the original on 22 January 2018. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  12. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Hope Vale (UCL)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 26 January 2016. Edit this at Wikidata
  13. ^ "State and non-state school details". Queensland Government. 9 July 2018. Archived from the original on 21 November 2018. Retrieved 21 November 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ "Hopevale Campus of CYAAA". Archived from the original on 22 February 2017. Retrieved 21 November 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ "Queensland Globe". State of Queensland. Retrieved 19 February 2021.
  16. ^ "Noel Pearson: Vale hope in outback hellhole - Opinion - The Australian". 13 June 2007. Archived from the original on 13 June 2007. Retrieved 19 March 2018.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  17. ^ "Mainland communities L-M". slq.qld.gov.au. State Library of Queensland. Archived from the original on 19 March 2018. Retrieved 27 June 2017.

External links[edit]