Horace Field

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Horace Field
BornJuly 17, 1861
22 Chalcot Crescent, Primrose Hill, London
DiedJune 16, 1948(1948-06-16) (aged 86)
Royal East County Hospital, Hastings, Sussex
Resting placeSt Michael's, Playden, Sussex
EducationUniversity College School, Hampstead
OccupationArchitect
Spouse(s)Mary Frances Campbell

Horace Field was a London-born architect. His work was often in a Wrenaissance style, as well as other post-gothic English historical revival styles, with influences from the Arts and Crafts movement and Richard Norman Shaw. His commissions including large houses and offices; he produced a number of works for Lloyds Bank as well as offices for the North Eastern Railway in London and York.

Early life[edit]

Horace Field was born 17 July 1861 at 22 Chalcot Crescent, London; the son of Horace Field (architect, District Surveyor of Putney and Roehampton, 1823–1879) and his wife Christina née White (d. 1866).[1] He was brought up at 30 Thurlow Road, Hampstead and was educated at University College School(1876-8).

Career[edit]

He trained as an architect at the Glasgow firm of John Burnet, then under Robert William Edis of London. Field was not inspired by Edis's work, but developed great admiration and respect for Richard Norman Shaw, architect and neighbour in Hampstead, who he knew socially – both for his work and as an example of humanity.[2]

Field started his own practice in 1882, as Field and Moore, together with his father's assistant Edwin Emmanuel Moore; their first work was Wedderburn House (1884–5), a six-storey block of flats in Hampstead; Wedderburn Cottage (1886) followed adjacent.[2]

In 1887 he married Mary Frances Campbell, daughter of James Campbell at St James Episcopal Church, Leith.[3] He joined the Art Workers Guild in 1889.[2] "The Hoo" (17, Lyndhurst Gardens) in Camden was built 1890, and further properties at Nos. 19–21 Lyndhurst Road in 1898.[4]

In 1890 Field took on Michael Bunney as a trainee; Bunney became Field's chief assistant, until 1902, when he formed his own practice. Together they wrote English domestic architecture of the XVII and XVIII centuries.[2] Field's first commercial business client was Lloyds Bank who commissioned bank buildings at Hampstead c.1895; subsequently Lloyds used Field as architect over a 30-year period.[5]

In 1898 the North Eastern Railway (NER) chose Field as architect for their new main headquarters in York. Working with William Bell the company's architect, whose input was mainly structural or contractual, the office buildings were constructed between 1900 and 1906, with Field receiving £1,750 payment for his work.[6] Field also received the commission to design the NER's London offices in Cowley Street, his plans were submitted 1904 and the building completed 1906.[7]

In 1899 Evelyn Simmons joined the practice, initially being articled, then assistant and finally in partnership from 1905 to 1915. Further co-operation with Amos Faulkner, architect for the builders William Willett and Son, produced designs for several large London houses, and apartments. Field left the Art Workers' Guild in 1903 and joined RIBA in 1906.

Mary Field's friendship with Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and her circle of friends led to him becoming the consulting architect to the New Hospital for Women on Euston Road from 1888 to 1905, where he designed a nurses home (now demolished) at the rear of the building.[8]

He was a keen golfer, which led to many commissions for "golf cottages" (the term then used for houses close to golf courses) near Woking, Surrey and Aldeburgh, Suffolk, where he also designed the Aldeburgh Golf Club house in 1911, a replacement for an earlier building destroyed by fire.[9]

Later life[edit]

He continued in practice until 1931, retiring to Rye in 1932, where he undertook a few commissions for small house designs and alterations. His last built design was in 1941, as a favour for his cousin Daisy Field, at Great Dixter, for a conversion of a store attached to the oasthouse into a cow house.[10]

He died on 16 June 1948[11] and is buried with his wife Mary Frances (1859-1950) in the churchyard at St Michael's Playden, Sussex.

Selected works[edit]

Fields' work has been described as being in the wrenaissance style;[12] his exteriors included a variety of historical revival styles, such as Queen Anne revival and neo-Georgian. Most works were done in red brick, often with stone dressing. He often made use of steeply pitched roofs with dormer windows to contain extra stories.[13]

A list of works by Horace Field on the Historic England Register of Listed Buildings
[14]
  • Wedderburn House, 1 Wedderburn Road, Hampstead (1884–5).[15]
  • "Wedderburn Cottage" 3, Wedderburn Road, Hampstead (1886).[16]
  • 5, Wedderburn Road, Hampstead (1886).[17]
  • 7 & 9, Wedderburn Road, Hampstead (1887).[18]
  • 11 & 13, Wedderburn Road, Hampstead (1888).[19]
  • "The Hoo"; 17, Lyndhurst Gardens (1889–90).[20]
  • 11, 12 & 13 Gainsborough Gardens, Camden (1893–5).[21]
  • 14, Gainsborough Gardens, Hampstead (1894–5).[22]
  • Lloyds Bank, 40 & 40A, Rosslyn Hill, with adjoining terraced houses, Hampstead (1895–7).[23]
  • 19, 20 & 21 Lyndhurst Road, Hampstead (1897–8).[24]
  • Granville Hotel, Ramsgate, Kent (1900) Alterations.[25]
  • North Eastern Railway company offices, York (1900–1906).[26]
  • 5. St.Clements Ln., 6 & 7, Portugal Street, City of Westminster (1903).[27]
  • Lloyds Bank, 36 High Street, Wealdstone, Harrow, Middlesex (1903).[28]
  • 4, Cowley Street, City of Westminster, (1904–5). London offices for the North Eastern Railway.[29]
  • Lloyds Bank, West Street, Okehampton, Devon (1908)[30]
  • 8, Barton Street, City of Westminster (1909).[31]
  • 12A and 14–18 Devonshire Street, Marylebone (1912) with Simmonds and Faulkner.[32]
  • 7 Palace Green, Kensington (1913) with Simmons and Faulkner.[33]
  • Priors Hill, 48 Park Road, Aldeburgh, Suffolk (before 1914).[34]
  • Gorsehill, Leiston Road, Aldeburgh, Suffolk (1928).[35]
Publications
  • Field, Horace; Bunney, Michael (1905), English domestic architecture of the XVII and XVIII centuries : a selection of examples of smaller buildings measured drawn and photographed with an introduction and notes, George Bell and Sons

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fawcett & Howat 2006, p. 15-16.
  2. ^ a b c d Fawcett & Howat 2006, p. 16.
  3. ^ St James Gazette 27/12/1887 p15
  4. ^ Fawcett & Howat 2006, pp. 16, 18.
  5. ^ Fawcett & Howat 2006, p. 18.
  6. ^ Fawcett & Howat 2006, pp. 18–45.
  7. ^ Fawcett & Howat 2006, pp. 47–48.
  8. ^ Minutes of the Building Committee, New Hospital for Women, held at the London Metropolitan Archives
  9. ^ Aldeburgh Golf Club 1884-2014 by Stephen Barnard ISBN 9780992856205
  10. ^ East Sussex Record Office ref: DR/C/8/20
  11. ^ Fawcett & Howat 2006, p. 56.
  12. ^ "Horace Field (1861–1948)", Oxford Reference, Oxford University Press
  13. ^ For details see individual building entries
  14. ^ "What are Listed Buildings? How England's historic buildings are protected | Historic England".
  15. ^ Historic England. "Wedderburn House, Camden (1379137)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  16. ^ Historic England. ""Wedderburn Cottage" 3, Wedderburn Road, Camden (1379138)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  17. ^ Historic England. "5, Wedderburn Road, Camden (1379139)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  18. ^ Historic England. "7 & 9, Wedderburn Road, Camden (1379140)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  19. ^ Historic England. "11 & 13, Wedderburn Road, Camden (1379147)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  20. ^ Historic England. "17, Lyndhurst Gardens, Camden (1113327)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  21. ^ Historic England. "11, 12 & 13 Gainsborough Gardens, Camden (1417880)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  22. ^ Historic England. "14, Gainsborough Gardens, Camden (1096077)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  23. ^ Historic England. "Lloyds Bank 40 & 40A, Rosslyn Hill; Nos. 1 & 3, Pilgrims Lane. Camden (1130392)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  24. ^ Historic England. "19, 20 & 21 Lyndhurst Road, Camden (1379401)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  25. ^ Historic England. "former Granville Hotel (1203535)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  26. ^ Historic England. "former North Eastern Railway company offices (1256400)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  27. ^ Historic England. "5. St.Clements Ln., 6 & 7, Portugal Street, City of Westminster (1263524)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  28. ^ Historic England. "Former Lloyds Bank, 36 High Street, Wealdstone (1471819)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  29. ^ Historic England. "former NER London offices, 4, Cowley Street SW1 (1290822)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  30. ^ Historic England. "Lloyds Bank, West Street, Okehampton, Devon (1326193)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  31. ^ Historic England. "8, Barton Street SW1 (1066475)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  32. ^ Historic England. "12A Devonshire Street; 14–18 Devonshire Street. SW1 (1066894)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.
  33. ^ Historic England. "7 Palace Green (1065948)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  34. ^ Historic England. "Priors Hill (1269718)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 21 January 2021.
  35. ^ Historic England. "Gorsehill, Leiston Rd., Suffolk (1269753)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 15 November 2013.

Sources[edit]

  • Fawcett, Bill; Howat, Patrick (2006), The North Eastern Railway's Two Palaces of Business, Friends of the National Railway Museum, ISBN 1872826148
  • "Horace Field", www.scottisharchitects.org.uk

Literature[edit]

External links[edit]