Horace Winchell Magoun

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Horace Winchell Magoun (June 23, 1907 – March 6, 1991) studied medicine first at the Rhode Island State College and the Syracuse University, graduating in medicine in 1931. In 1934 earned a Ph.D. in anatomy at the Faculty of Medicine 'Northwestern University, and remained in it first as a university assistant (1934–1937) and then as professor of microscopic anatomy (1937–1950). In 1948, in collaboration with the Italian neurophysiologist Giuseppe Moruzzi, Magoun identified the brain center responsible for the state of sleep: electrical stimulation of the brain stem, by Moruzzi and Magoun found a link between the station cerebellum and motor cortex, producing EEG waves typical of a state of intense supervision. With further investigation showed that both the deep brain stimulation of this structure, which they named "reticular formation", caused the awakening of the animal, while its destruction made him fall into a coma permanent.[1] With this guide "classic".[2][3] Are considered "classics" those works that have been cited in over 400 scientific papers[4] and Moruzzi Magoun laid the foundations for studying the physiology of sleep.

Magoun took part in numerous projects and research in anatomy and physiology was one of the fathers of the neuroscience, the multidisciplinary approach to the study of nervous system. In 1962 Horace Magounsi moved to 'University of California at Los Angeles as professor of anatomy and as a result of psychiatry. In California, besides the study of the factors that control sleep and waking, Magoun was interested in neuroendocrinology, showing among other things, the important role of 'hypothalamus. In 1963 published an essay (The working brain) which summed up its work on the neuroendocrinology.[5]

Awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Moruzzi G, Magoun HW., Brain stem reticulata formation and activation of the EEG. Electroencephalogr Clin. Neurophysiol.I :455-473, 1949. Reprinted in:J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. Spring 1995, 7 (2) :251-67, PMID 7626974
  2. ^ Curr. Cont Life Sci 24 (1981): 21
  3. ^ pdf
  4. ^ Citation Classics
  5. ^ Horace W. Magoun, The waking brain, Springfield: Thomas, 1958

References[edit]

  • Horace Winchell Magoun and Giuseppe Moruzzi,Triangle. November 1958, 3 (7) :295-7, PMID 13625385
  • "Magoun, Horace Winchell 1907-91. In:The Houghton Mifflin dictionary of biography,New York, etc.. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2003, ISBN 0-618-25210-X
  • Marshall LH. "Horace Winchell Magoun," Mem Natl Acad Scibiography. 2004; 84:250-69, PMID 15484420
  • Francis Wilson Smith and Thomas Bender,American Higher Education Transformed, 1940-2005: documenting the national discourse,JHU Press, 2008, ISBN 0-8018-8671-6, p. 221 (onepage # v & q = & f online = false)

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