Horsey, Norfolk

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Horsey
Horsey-g1.jpg
Horsey All Saints
Horsey is located in Norfolk
Horsey
Horsey
Horsey shown within Norfolk
Area 8.49 km2 (3.28 sq mi)
Population 99 (2001)
• Density 12/km2 (31/sq mi)
OS grid reference TG4523
Civil parish
  • Horsey
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town GREAT YARMOUTH
Postcode district NR29
Dialling code 01493
Police Norfolk
Fire Norfolk
Ambulance East of England
EU Parliament East of England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Norfolk
52°44′56″N 1°38′20″E / 52.749°N 1.639°E / 52.749; 1.639Coordinates: 52°44′56″N 1°38′20″E / 52.749°N 1.639°E / 52.749; 1.639

Horsey is a village and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk within The Broads National Park. It covers an area of 8.49 km2 (3.28 sq mi) and had a population of 99 in 40 households at the 2001 census.[1] At the 2011 Census the population remained less than 100 and was included in the civil parish of Sea Palling. For the purposes of local government, it falls within the district of North Norfolk.

It is situated at the end of Horsey Mere, a nature reserve.

Horsey windpump is the youngest Windpump in the Broads having been built by Dan England in 1912 and is in the care of the National Trust. It was struck by lightning in 1943 and ceased working at this time. It has recently succumbed to the elements and ravages of time and is currently without sails. It is due to have its cap and sails repaired and reinstated in an exciting restoration project during 2016 with a longer ambition of having it fully restored to working order. The tea room and Windpump is open from March until October but the wider estate is open all year.

Horsey has often taken the brunt of devastating floods and violent coastal storms and, on some notable occasions, the sea has entered the Broads, rendering the water salty and killing large numbers of wildlife. The 18th century owner of Horsey, Sir Berney Brograve, by reviving a previous Act of Parliament, unsuccessfully tried to have the sea breaches repaired after many destructive inundations of his estate.

The church of Horsey All Saints is one of 124 existing round-tower churches in Norfolk.

The coast next to the village, known as Horsey Dunes, is a major wildlife site. During the months of November to January, a colony of Grey Seals heads on to the beach to give birth to seal pups. Creating a beautiful local attraction for many wildlife enthusiasts.

Beach near Horsey Corner
Horsey windpump

Further reading[edit]

  • Nicol, Cheryl (2016). Sir Berney Brograve: A Very Anxious Man. CreateSpace Independent Publishing. ISBN 978-1518771972. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Census population and household counts for unparished urban areas and all parishes. Office for National Statistics & Norfolk County Council (2001). Retrieved 20 June 2009.

External links[edit]