Horsted Keynes railway station

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Horsted Keynes
Horsted Keynes station sign and Sharpthorn.JPG
The station sign and Sharpthorn
Location
PlaceHorsted Keynes
AreaMid Sussex, West Sussex
Coordinates51°02′46″N 0°02′41″W / 51.0461°N 0.0446°W / 51.0461; -0.0446Coordinates: 51°02′46″N 0°02′41″W / 51.0461°N 0.0446°W / 51.0461; -0.0446
Grid referenceTQ370292
Operations
Managed byLondon, Brighton and South Coast Railway
Owned bySouthern Railway
Southern Region of British Railways
Bluebell Railway
Platforms5 (with tracks 1,2,3 and 4/5)
History
1882Station opened
7 July 1935Electric trains commence via Ardingly
1962Commencement of Bluebell Railway services
1963Cessation of British Railways services
Stations on heritage railways in the United Kingdom
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Horsted Keynes railway station is a preserved railway station on the Bluebell Railway in Sussex. The station has been used as a shooting location in several film and TV productions.

History[edit]

Bluebell Railway train at Horsted Keynes in 1964

The station was closed by British Railways under the Beeching Axe on 28 October 1963 with the cessation of trains from Seaford via Haywards Heath (trains over the Lewes to East Grinstead line having ceased in 1958). However, the first Bluebell Railway trains had run on the last day of the 1962 season using the disused eastern side (electrified services only used Platform 2). Between 1960 and 1962 Bluebell Railway services had terminated at Bluebell Halt - a temporary station about half mile to the south.

As a junction station it was the busiest station on the line in terms of services but arguably one of the quieter for passengers. The station lies about 1.5 mi (2.4 km) from the village of Horsted Keynes itself.

1930s ambience of Platform 5

Since being taken over by the Bluebell the station has become one of the most popular stations in UK preservation, and has won many awards. It has been restored under a 1930s theme with period newspaper headlines on boards by the buffet and adverts of the period. With five platforms it is the largest preserved heritage railway station in the UK.[citation needed] It is the crossing place for services when two trains are operating and hosts many events each year for steam enthusiasts. It is also the home of the line's Carriage and Wagon department.

The Bluebell Railway plans to eventually make this station a junction once again if plans to extend toward Ardingly are realised, creating something rare within UK preservation, a junction station where both lines are operated by preservationists.

Listed buildings[edit]

The main station building, the signal box and an engine house to the south of the station are all Grade II Listed buildings. All three were originally built in or shortly after 1882 to the designs of Thomas Myres, the railway company's staff architect.[1][2][3]

See also[edit]

Preceding station Heritage Railways  Heritage railways Following station
Kingscote   Bluebell Railway   Sheffield Park
Disused railways
West Hoathly
Line open, station closed
  London, Brighton and South Coast Railway
Lewes and East Grinstead Railway
  Sheffield Park
Line and station open
    Ardingly
Line and station closed

References[edit]

  1. ^ Historic England. "Horsted Keynes Railway Station  (Grade II) (1257915)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 9 October 2013.
  2. ^ Historic England. "Horsted Keynes Signal Box  (Grade II) (1257907)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 9 October 2013.
  3. ^ Historic England. "Engine House at Horsted Keynes Railway Station  (Grade II) (1257917)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 9 October 2013.

External links[edit]