Hortonville, Wisconsin

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Hortonville, Wisconsin
Village of Hortonville Logo.jpg
Location of Hortonville in Outagamie County, Wisconsin.
Location of Hortonville in Outagamie County, Wisconsin.
Coordinates: 44°20′7″N 88°38′20″W / 44.33528°N 88.63889°W / 44.33528; -88.63889Coordinates: 44°20′7″N 88°38′20″W / 44.33528°N 88.63889°W / 44.33528; -88.63889
CountryUnited States
StateWisconsin
CountyOutagamie
Area
 • Total2.70 sq mi (6.99 km2)
 • Land2.04 sq mi (5.28 km2)
 • Water0.66 sq mi (1.71 km2)
Elevation794 ft (242 m)
Population
 • Total2,711
 • Estimate 
(2016)[4]
2,734
 • Density1,341.51/sq mi (518.07/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
Area code(s)920
FIPS code55-35850[5]
GNIS feature ID1566752[2]
WebsiteVillage Website

Hortonville is a village in Outagamie County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 2,711 at the 2010 census.

Hortonville is located in the Fox Cities region and the Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah, WI CSA, the third largest metropolitan area in Wisconsin.

History[edit]

In 1848, a man by the name of Alonzo Horton purchased 1,500 acres from the governor of Wisconsin, now known as the Town of Hortonia and the Village of Hortonville, for only 70 cents per acre. The first thing Horton did was build a cabin, by damming the Black Otter Creek, which created the 75-acre (300,000 m2) Black Otter Lake. After laying out a plat for the community by buying land and platting it off in 1849, Horton was swayed westward by the California Gold Rush. He later developed the city of San Diego, California.[6][7]

On August 11, 1894, the settlement was incorporated as the Village of Hortonville. At that time, it had one of the first match light factories in the world.[8]

During World War II, a German POW camp was established in Hortonville along County Hwy MM on the north side of the village.[9]

In 1981, the Hortonville Community Hall, now known as the Hortonville Opera House, was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Geography[edit]

Hortonville is located at 44°20′7″N 88°38′20″W / 44.33528°N 88.63889°W / 44.33528; -88.63889 (44.335196, -88.638847).[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 3.55 square miles (9.19 km2), of which, 3.47 square miles (8.99 km2) of it is land and 0.08 square miles (0.21 km2) is water.[11]

Black Otter Lake[edit]

The community is located on the shores of the 75-acre (300,000 m2) Black Otter Lake. It is drained by Black Otter Creek, which flows into the Wolf River just north of the village. The total watershed for the lake is estimated to be 16 square miles (41 km2).[12]

The Black Otter is the only public access lake in Outagamie County. Because of this, it receives substantial recreational use, primarily by anglers, throughout the year. Fish species in the lake include: bluegill, largemouth bass, black crappie, yellow perch, northern pike and catfish.[12]

The village maintains: two public boat launches, a kayak launch, fishing pier and three parks along the shores of the lake.

Demographics[edit]

Hortonville is a part of the Appleton-Oshkosh-Neenah CSA, a Combined Statistical Area that includes the Appleton (Calumet and Outagamie counties) and Oshkosh-Neenah (Winnebago County) metropolitan areas,[13][14] which had a combined population of 358,365 at the 2000 census.[5]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880311
189044041.5%
1900913107.5%
1910863−5.5%
192096011.2%
1930906−5.6%
19409686.8%
19501,08111.7%
19601,36626.4%
19701,52411.6%
19802,01632.3%
19902,0290.6%
20002,35716.2%
20102,71115.0%
Est. 20162,734[4]0.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 2,711 people, 1,045 households, and 766 families residing in the village. The population density was 781.3 inhabitants per square mile (301.7/km2). There were 1,105 housing units at an average density of 318.4 per square mile (122.9/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 96.9% White, 0.2% African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.2% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.5% of the population.

There were 1,045 households of which 38.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 26.7% were non-families. 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the village was 36.7 years. 26.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 29% were from 25 to 44; 25.2% were from 45 to 64; and 11.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 49.2% male and 50.8% female.

2000 census[edit]

At the 2000 census,[5] there were 2,357 people, 871 households and 634 families residing in the village. The population density was 868.2 per square mile (335.8/km²). There were 904 housing units at an average density of 333.0 per square mile (128.8/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 96.99% White, 0.13% African American, 0.04% Native American, 2.21% Asian, 0.17% from other races, and 0.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.64% of the population.

There were 871 households of which 38.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.5% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 22.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.21.

29.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 31.3% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males.

The median household income was $51,635 and the median family income was $55,298. Males had a median income of $41,689 compared with $24,680 for females. The per capita income for the village was $20,277. About 4.4% of families and 6.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.2% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation[edit]

WIS 15.svg
WIS 15 (Main Street) travels east to Greenville and Appleton and west to New London.
WIS County M.svg
County M (Nash Street and Olk Street) travels north to WIS 54 and south to WIS 96 at Medina.
WIS County T.svg
County T travels northwest to New London and south to WIS 96 at Dale.
WIS County JJ.svg
County JJ travels east to Greenville and Kaukauna.
WIS County MM.svg
County MM (North Crest Street) travels northeast to WIS 76 at Stephensville.
WIS County TT.svg
County TT travels west to US 45, which was rerouted west of the village in 2003.
Rustic road.svg
Rustic Road 61 is a 3.5-mile (5.6 km) state-designated scenic route that follows County MM from Hortonville to Stephensville.

Appleton International Airport provides commercial airline service to the village.

The Canadian National Railroad operates a railroad track along the southern edge of the village, with a freight station near S Nash Street. It also operates 3 crossings - one at W Main Street/ WIS 15, another at S Lincoln Street, and a third at S Nash Street.

Religion[edit]

The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod has two churches in Hortonville: Bethlehem Lutheran Church[16] and St Paul Lutheran Church. Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic Community, a Roman Catholic church, has been in Hortonville since 1897[17].

Education[edit]

The Hortonville Area School District, which includes a high school, two middle schools and three elementary schools, serves the village and the surrounding communities. Bethlehem Lutheran School is a 4K-8th grade Christian school of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod in Hortonville.[18]

Points of interest[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 14, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ About The Village of Hortonville, Wisconsin who later went on to develop San Diego
  7. ^ https://hortonvillelibrary.org/history/history
  8. ^ About Hortonville
  9. ^ POW camps Archived 2011-06-14 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-11-18.
  12. ^ a b http://blackotterlake.com/files/6-23-08_Update_Lake_Management_Plan.pdf
  13. ^ METROPOLITAN STATISTICAL AREAS AND COMPONENTS , Office of Management and Budget, 2007-05-11. Accessed 2008-08-01.
  14. ^ COMBINED STATISTICAL AREAS AND COMPONENT CORE BASED STATISTICAL AREAS , Office of Management and Budget, 2007-05-11. Accessed 2008-08-01.
  15. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  16. ^ "Bethlehem Ev. Lutheran".
  17. ^ "Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic Community".
  18. ^ "Who We Are".

External links[edit]