Hospodářské noviny

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For the Slovak newspaper, see Hospodárske noviny.
Hospodářské noviny
Hospodářské noviny logo.gif
HospodarskeNoviny09Dec2010.jpg
The 9 December 2010 front page of
Hospodářské noviny
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Publisher Economia
Founded 21 May 1990; 26 years ago (1990-05-21)
Political alignment Centre-right, Liberal conservativism, pro-TOP 09
Language Czech
Headquarters Dobrovského 25, Prague, Czech Republic
Circulation 43,000 (2013)
ISSN 0862-9587
Website hn.ihned.cz

Hospodářské noviny (English: "Economic Newspaper") is a daily newspaper in Prague, the Czech Republic.

History and profile[edit]

Hospodářské noviny was first published on 21 May 1990.[1] The paper is headquartered in Prague and has a specific focus on economics.[2] The founder and publisher is a joint company, Economia AS, Economia[3][4] which is a German-American firm.[1][5] The daily has a neutral political stance,[6] but Jaromír Volek described it as a centre-right publication in 2009.[7] It is published in broadsheet format.[4]

Circulation[edit]

The circulation of Hospodářské noviny was 75,000 copies in 2002.[4] In October 2003 the paper had a circulation of 74,195 copies.[1] The circulation of the paper was 66,024 copies in December 2004.[8] It was 67,000 copies for 2004 as a whole.[9]

The 2007 circulation of the paper was 58,783 copies.[10] The circulation of Hospodářské noviny was 57,390 copies in 2008 and 54,285 copies in 2009.[11] It was 44,225 copies in 2010 and 41,933 copies in 2011.[11] As of September 2013 it was the 9th most widely circulated newspaper in the country with the circulation of 43,000 copies.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Milan Smid. "Czech Republic" (PDF). Mirovni Institut. Retrieved 28 October 2014. 
  2. ^ "The press in the Czech Republic". BBC News. 10 December 2005. Retrieved 13 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "Hospodářské noviny mění šéfredaktora, Šabata střídá Šimůnka". iDNES.cz (in Czech). 22 December 2010. Retrieved 13 December 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "World Press Trends 2003" (PDF). World Association of Newspapers. Paris. 2004. Retrieved 15 February 2015. 
  5. ^ Craig Stephen Cravens (1 January 2006). Culture and Customs of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 108. ISBN 978-0-313-33412-2. Retrieved 31 October 2014. 
  6. ^ Vlastimil Nečas (Fall 2009). "Constitutional debate in the Czech Republic" (PDF). Central European Journal of Communication. 2 (2). Retrieved 31 December 2014. 
  7. ^ Jaromír Volek (20 March 2009). "The market takes all". Eurozine. Retrieved 17 February 2015. 
  8. ^ Vladimir Kroupa; Milan Smid (13 May 2005). "Media System of the Czech Republic" (Report). Hans Bredow Institut. Hamburg. Retrieved 17 February 2015. 
  9. ^ "Media pluralism in the Member States of the European Union" (PDF). Commission of the European Communities. Brussels. 16 January 2007. Retrieved 27 March 2015. 
  10. ^ Jan Jirák; Barbara Köpplová (2008). "The Reality Show Called Democratization: Transformation of the Czech media After 1989" (PDF). Global Media Journal. 1 (4). Retrieved 28 October 2014. 
  11. ^ a b "National newspapers total circulation". International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations. Retrieved 5 December 2014. 
  12. ^ "Periodický tisk - neověřená data". ABC (in Czech). Retrieved 13 December 2013. 

External links[edit]