House of Schwarzenberg

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House of Schwarzenberg
Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg
Arms of the Princes of Schwarzenberg
Titles
Style(s) Serene Highness
Founded 12th century
Founder Erkinger of Seinsheim
Current head Karel VII of Schwarzenberg
(Princely) County of Schwarzenberg
(Gefürstete) Grafschaft Schwarzenberg
State of the Holy Roman Empire
Franconia
1429–1806


Coat of arms

Capital Schwarzenberg Castle, Scheinfeld;
Český Krumlov (de facto since 1670s)
Government Principality
Historical era Late Middle Ages
Early Modern Era
 •  Acquired by the lords of Seinsheim 1405 – 1421
 •  Imperial immediacy 1429
 •  Raised to
    Imperial County
1599
 •  Raised to
    Princely County
14 July 1670
 •  Raised to Princely
    Landgraviate
 
1671
 •  German Mediatisation 1806

Schwarzenberg (formerly in Czech too: Schwarzenberg) is the name of a Czech (Bohemian) and German (Franconian) aristocratic family, and it was one of the most prominent European noble houses. The Schwarzenbergs are members of the Bohemian nobility and German nobility and achieved the rank of Princes of the Holy Roman Empire. The family traces its roots to the lords of Seinsheim during the Middle Ages.[1]

The current head of the family is Karl, the 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg, a Czech politician who served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic. The family owns properties and lands across Austria, Czech Republic and Germany.

History[edit]

The family stems from the lords of Seinsheim, who had established themselves in Franconia during the Middle Ages.[2] A branch of the Seinsheim family (the non-Schwarzenberg portion died out in 1958) was created when Erkinger of Seinsheim acquired the Franconian territory of Schwarzenberg and the castle of Schwarzenberg in Scheinfeld during the early part of the 15th century. He was then granted the title of Freiherr (Baron) of Schwarzenberg in 1429. At that time, the family also possessed some fiefdoms in Bohemia.

In 1599, the Schwarzenbergs were elevated to Imperial Counts, and the family was later raised to princely status in 1670.[3] The House of Schwarzenberg acquired extensive land holdings in Bohemia in 1661 through a marriage alliance with the House of Eggenberg. In the 1670s, the Schwarzenbergs established their primary seat in Bohemia and, until 1918, their main residence was in Český Krumlov, Bohemia (now in the Czech Republic).

At the beginning of the 19th century, the House of Schwarzenberg was divided into two princely-titled lines (majorats).[4] The senior branch died out in the male line in 1979 upon the death of Joseph III of Schwarzenberg, who was the 11th Prince of Schwarzenberg. The cadet branch was established by Karl Philipp, Prince of Schwarzenberg, at Orlík, Murau and Vienna, and this branch continues to the present day.

The two branches have now been re-united under the current head of the family, Karl VII of Schwarzenberg, who is the 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg. He is a Czech politician and served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.

Imperial Immediate Estates[edit]

The Schwarzenberg family held three Imperial Immediate Estates in the Holy Roman Empire.

Name Timespan Map Coat of Arms Historic Map
Princely County of Schwarzenberg

Gefürstete Grafschaft Schwarzenberg
1429 - 1806
Location of Schwarzenberg
Location of Schwarzenberg
Schwarzenberg
Schwarzenberg (Germany)
Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg (Princely) County of Schwarzenberg
Princely Landgraviate of Klettgau

gefürstete Landgrafschaft Klettgau
1694 - 1806
Location Klettgau
Location Klettgau
Klettgau
Klettgau (Germany)
Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg Princely Landgraviate of Klettgau
County of Gimborn

Grafschaft Gimborn
1658 - 1782
Location of Gimborn
Location of Gimborn
Gimborn
Gimborn (Germany)
Princely Hat.svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
County of Gimborn

Coat of arms[edit]

Family Coat of Arms[edit]

The ancestral arms of the Lords of Seinsheim consisted of six vertical stripes in silver and blue.[5] However, the Schwarzenberg family's original coat of arms has four silver and four blue vertical stripes. Moreover, it starts with silver on the heraldic right (mirror-inverted perspective).

The family became Freiherren (Barons) of Schwarzenberg in 1429, and a silver tower on a black hill was added to their coat of arms to represent the city Scheinfeld and Schwarzenberg Castle.[6]

A motif from the Schwarzenberg coat of arms sculpted on a door handle in Hluboká Castle

In 1599, Adolf von Schwarzenberg became an Imperial Count, and was given by the emperor a quarter showing the head of a Turk being pecked by a raven. This was to commemorate Adolf's conquest on 19 March 1598 of the Turkish-held fortress and city Győr. The German name of the Hungarian town is Raab, which means raven.[7][8][9]

In 1670, the Schwarzenbergs were raised to princely status. However, only the marriage of Ferdinand, The 2nd Prince of Schwarzenberg (1652-1703) with Marie Anna Countess of Sulz (1653-1698), the daughter of Johann Ludwig II. Count of Sulz (1626-1687), led to the augmenting of their coat of arms, with quarters added for the domains of Sulz, Brandis (canting arms: a brand) and the Landgraviate of Klettgau.[10][11] Due to the absence of a male heir, Count Rudolf requested at the imperial court that the two families should be consolidated. This was granted, which meant for the Schwarzenberg family not only to assume all titles, rights and duties of the Counts of Sulz, but also to inherit all of Rudolf's properties.

The last augmentation of the family coat of arms was granted by the Austrian Emperor Franz II. / I. . He rewarded Field Marshal Karl I. Philipp Prince of Schwarzenberg with the right to bear the three-part arms of the Habsburg family with the addition of an upright standing sword. This unique distinction was granted to commemorate the field marshal's victory in the Battle of the Nations, where he was the Generalissimo of the Sixth Coalition.

The family motto is NIL NISI RECTUM.

Municipal Coat of Arms[edit]

Traces of the Schwarzenberg coat of arms can be found in various district and municipal coat of arms, which can be linked to the family

Notable family members[edit]

The House of Schwarzenberg produced many military commanders, politicians, church dignitaries (including a Cardinal), innovators and patrons of the arts.[12] They were related to a number of European aristocratic families, notably the Lobkowicz (Czech: Lobkovicové) family. Some of the most noteworthy members of the Schwarzenberg family are:

Name Portrait Arms Office(s) Marriage(s)
Issue
Comments
Johann Baron of Schwarzenberg
Johann the Strong
25 December 1463

21 October 1528
Johann Schwarzenberg by Albrecht Duerer Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Judge of the episcopal court at Bamberg Kunigunde, Countess of Rieneck
28 September 1469

18 October 1502
twelve children
Friend of Martin Luther, and author of the Constitutio Criminalis Bambergensis, which was the basis for the Constitutio Criminalis Carolina
Melchior of Schwarzenberg
ca. 1536

KIA 29 June 1579
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Military Commander
Military Governor
Anne de Merode-Houffalize
ca. 1530

1580
Commander of the Dutch States Party military forces in the Siege of Maastricht and Military Governor of Maastricht
Adolf, Count of Schwarzenberg
ca. 1547

29 July 1600
Schwarzenberg, Adolph; 1547-1600 (2).jpg Crown of a Count of France (variant).svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Field marshal Elisa Margareta von Wolff Metternich
?

6 February 1624
one son
Field marshal of the Holy Roman Empire and liberator of Győr (German: Raab)
Adam, Count of Schwarzenberg
1583

14 March 1641
1583-1641 Schwarzenberg, Adam.jpg Crown of a Count of France (variant).svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Herrenmeister (Grand Master)
Political advisor
Margareta, Freiin von Palant von Larochette und Moestroff
?

29 September 1615
two sons
Advisor of George William, Elector of Brandenburg, Herrenmeister (Grand Master) of the Order of Saint John

Son of Adolf, Count of Schwarzenberg
Georg Ludwig, Count of Schwarzenberg
24 December 1586

22 July 1646
Schwartzenberg CoA.jpg Statesman I. Anna Neumann von Wasserleonburg
25 November 1536

18 December 1623
no issue

II. Maria Elisabeth Countess of Sulz
1587

12 December 1651
two sons
Austrian statesman during the Thirty Years War

Through his marriage with Anna Neumann came the Dominion of Murau into the Schwarzenberg family
Ferdinand, 2nd Prince of Schwarzenberg
The Plague King
23 May 1652

22 October 1703
Ferdinand Schwarzenberg.jpg Princely Hat.svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Oberhofmarschall
Oberhofmeister
Maria Anna Countess of Sulz
ca. 1660

18 July 1698
eleven children
Oberhofmarschall and Oberhofmeister, known as the Plague King (Pestkönig)
Adam Franz, 3rd Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
25 September 1680

11 Juni 1732
Adam František Schwarzenberg.jpg Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg Obersthofmarschall (1711-1722)
Oberstallmeister (1722-1732)
Eleonore Princess of Lobkowicz
20 June 1682

5 May 1741
two children
First Duke of Krumlov, Count of Sulz and Princely Landgrave of Klettgau in the Schwarzenberg family

Initiator of the Schwarzenberg Navigational Canal

Killed accidentally by Emperor Charles VI during a driven shoot
Joseph I., 4th Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
15 December 1722

17 February 1782
Schwarzenberg, Joseph Adam.jpg Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg Obersthofmeister Maria Theresia Princess von und zu Liechtenstein
28 December 1721

19 January 1753
nine children
Obersthofmeister of Empress Maria Theresia, Minister of State, receives the Order of the Golden Fleece at the age of ten
Joseph II., 6th Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
27 June 1769

19 December 1833
Schwarzenberg, Joseph II Johann; 1789-1833.jpg Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg Ambassador Pauline Princess of Arenberg-Aarschot
2 September 1774

burned to death in the night of 1st to the 2nd July 1810
nine children
Ambassador of the Austrian Empire in Paris

Last Prince of Schwarzenberg, who possessed the imperial immediacy

Founder of the Schwarzenberg Primogeniture
Karl I. Philipp Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
15 April 1771

15 October 1820
Karel Filip Schwarzenberg.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Field marshal
Ambassador
Maria Anna Countess von Hohenfeld
widowed Princess Esterházy
20 May 1768

2 April 1848
three sons
Austrian field marshal during the Napoleonic Wars and ambassador in St.Petersburg and Paris, Generalissimo of the Sixth Coalition in the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig

Founder of the Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture
Ernst Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
29 May 1773

14 March 1821
Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg Bishop - Canon of Cologne, Liège, Salzburg, Passau, Esztergom and Bishop of Győr
Felix Prince of Schwarzenberg
The Austrian Bismarck
Duke of Krumlov
2 October 1800

5 April 1852
Prince Felix of Schwarzenberg, Austrian statesman Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg Minister-President
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Field Marshal Lieutenant
Two children with Jane Digby, Lady Ellenborough Minister-President of the Austrian Empire between 1848 and 1852
Friedrich Prince of Schwarzenberg
The Lansquenet
30 September 1800

6 March 1870
Friedrich Karl Schwarzenberg 1854 Litho.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Major General
Writer
- Major general of the Austrian Empire, Colonel of the General Staff in the Spanish First Carlist War, officer in the Swiss Sonderbund War and author, known as der Landsknecht (the Lansquenet)
Karl II. Prince of Schwarzenberg
The Governor
21 January 1802

25 June 1858
Karl II Schwarzenberg 1850 Litho.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
General of the branch
(Military) Governor
Josephine Countess Wratislaw of Mitrovic
16 April 1802

17 April 1881
one son
General of the branch of the Austrian Empire, Military Governor of Milan and Governor of the Principality of Transylvania (today Romania), known as der Gouverneur (the governor)
Edmund Prince of Schwarzenberg
18 November 1803

17 November 1873
Emund Schwarzenberg.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Field marshal - Last Austrian field marshal in the 19th century
Friedrich Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
6 April 1809

27 March 1885
Schwarzenberg.jpg COA cardinal AT Schwarzenberg Friedrich Joseph.png Cardinal
Archbishop
- Cardinal and Archbishop of Salzburg, then Archbishop of Prague
Felix Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
8 June 1867

18 November 1946
Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg Major general Anna Princess zu Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg
28 September 1873

27 June 1936
five children
Major general in WWI, one of only two recipients of the Golden Medal of Bravery for Officers by Emperor Charles I.
Heinrich Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
29 January 1903

18 June 1965
Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg Public servant Eleonore Countess zu Stolberg-Stolberg
8 August 1920

27 Dezember 1994
one daughter
Austrian public servant and survivor of the Buchenwald concentration camp
Johannes Prince of Schwarzenberg
31 January 1903

26 May 1978
Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Public servant Kathleen Vicomtesse de Spoelberch
19 May 1905

26 May 1978
two children
Austrian ambassador in Italy (1947-1955), to the Holy See (1955-1966) and Ambassador to the Court of St James's (1966-1969), Director and Delegate of the Red Cross and member of the Governing Board
Karl VI., Prince of Schwarzenberg
5 July 1911

9 April 1986
Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Officer
Regent
Author
Antonia Princess zu Fürstenberg
12 January 1905

24 December 1988
four children
Czech resistance fighter in WWII, Regent of the Grand Priory of Bohemia of the Order of Malta, historian and author
Karl, 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg
10 December 1937
Karel Schwarzenberg and Hillary Clinton.jpg Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg President of the Council of the European Union
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Vice prime minister
Senator
Therese Countess zu Hardegg auf Glatz und im Machlande
17 February 1940

two children
Czech politician, former Minister of Foreign Affairs (Czech Republic) and current head of the House of Schwarzenberg

Property and residences[edit]

Bohemia[edit]

The Schwarzenberg land holdings in Bohemia included the Duchy of Krumlov, the town of Prachatice and Orlík Castle. The family also acquired the property of the House of Rosenberg (Czech: Rožmberkové). On their lands, the Schwarzenbergs created ponds, planted forests and introduced new technologies in agriculture.[13]

Upon the establishment of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia in 1939, the possessions of Prince Adolph of Schwarzenberg were seized by the Nazi authorities. He managed to flee, but his cousin Heinrich, Duke of Krumlov, was arrested and deported. After World War II, the Czechoslovakian government stated, by law No. 143/1947 from August 13, 1947 (Lex Schwarzenberg), that the assets of the Schwarzenberg-Hluboká primogeniture passed to the Land of Bohemia.[14]

Castles and palaces[edit]

The Schwarzenberg property holdings included the following residences:

Name Image Location Map Comments
Schwarzenberg Castle Schloß Schwarzenberg at Scheinfeld, Franconia Scheinfeld, Franconia
Location of Scheinfeld
Location of Scheinfeld
Scheinfeld
Scheinfeld (Germany)
Ancestral seat

Held to present
Krumlov Castle
Krumau Castle
Český Krumlov Castle Český Krumlov, South Bohemia
Location of Český Krumlov Castle
Location of Český Krumlov Castle
Český Krumlov
Český Krumlov (Czech Republic)
Held from 1719 until the expropriation in 1947

UNESCO World Heritage Site

One of the largest castles in the world
Hluboká Castle
Frauenberg Castle
Hluboká nad Vltavou, zámek.jpg Hluboká nad Vltavou, South Bohemia
Location of Hluboká Castle
Location of Hluboká Castle
Hluboká nad Vltavou
Hluboká nad Vltavou (Czech Republic)
Acquired by Johann Adolf I of Schwarzenberg in 1661

Held until the expropriation in 1947

One of the finest examples of Neo-Tudor architecture in Historicism
Vimperk Castle
Winterberg Castle
Zámek Vimperk 02.JPG Vimperk, South Bohemia
Location of Vimperk Castle
Location of Vimperk Castle
Vimperk
Vimperk (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1698

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Třeboň Castle
Wittingau Castle
Zámek Třeboň, Třeboň 111.JPG Třeboň, South Bohemia
Location of Třeboň Castle
Location of Třeboň Castle
Třeboň
Třeboň (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1698

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Orlík Castle
Worlik Castle
Orlík 7.jpg Orlík nad Vltavou, South Bohemia
Location of Orlík Castle
Location of Orlík Castle
Orlík nad Vltavou
Orlík nad Vltavou (Czech Republic)
Main residence of the Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture

Restored in 1992

Held to present

Publicly accessible
Čimelice Castle Čimelice. Zámek. (26).jpg Čimelice, South Bohemia
Location of Čimelice
Location of Čimelice
Čimelice
Čimelice (Czech Republic)
Spring and summer residence of the Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture

Restored in 1992

Held to present
Karlov Castle Zámek Karlov (SMETANOVA LHOTA).jpg Karlov (Smetanova Lhota), South Bohemia
Location of Karlov Castle
Location of Karlov Castle
Karlov
Karlov (Czech Republic)
Restored in 1992

Held to present
Zvíkov Castle
Zwingenberg Castle
Zvíkov 4.jpg Zvíkov, South Bohemia
Location of Zvíkov Castle
Location of Zvíkov Castle
Zvíkov
Zvíkov (Czech Republic)
Publicly accessible
Palais Schwarzenberg Palais Schwarzenberg.jpg Schwarzenbergplatz, Landstraße, Vienna
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Schwarzenbergplatz)
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Schwarzenbergplatz)
Vienna
Vienna (Austria)
Acquired in 1716

Held to present
Palais Schwarzenberg Rudolf Ritter von Alt 009.jpg Neuer Markt, Innere Stadt, Vienna
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Neuer Markt)
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Neuer Markt)
Vienna
Vienna (Austria)
Acquired in 1688

1894 demolished
Neuwaldegg Castle
Villa Schwarzenberg
Schloss Neuwaldegg 7.JPG Hernals, Vienna
Location of Neuwaldegg Castle
Location of Neuwaldegg Castle
Vienna
Vienna (Austria)
Acquired in 1801

Sold in 1951
Palais Schwarzenberg Bürgergasse L1260376a.jpg Graz, Styria
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Neuer Markt)
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Neuer Markt)
Graz
Graz (Austria)
Acquired in 1775

Sold in 1853/54
Murau Castle
Obermurau Castle
Murau Styria.jpg Murau, Styria
Location of Murau Castle
Location of Murau Castle
Murau
Murau (Austria)
Publicly accessible on appointment

Held to present
Palais Schwarzenberg
Schwarzenberský palác
Schwarzenberský.JPG Prague
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg
Prague
Prague (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1719

Held until the expropriation in 1947

Publicly accessible
Palais Salm
Salmovský palác
Small Palais Schwarzenberg
Salmovský palác zepředu.jpg Prague
Location of Palais Salm
Location of Palais Salm
Prague
Prague (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1811

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Schwarzenberg Palais SchwarzenbergPalaisFrickenhausen.JPG Frickenhausen am Main, Lower Franconia
Location of Schwarzenberg Palais (Frickenhausen am Main)
Location of Schwarzenberg Palais (Frickenhausen am Main)
Frickenhausen am Main
Frickenhausen am Main (Germany)
Tiengen Castle Tiengen WT Schloss.JPG Waldshut-Tiengen, Baden-Württemberg
Location of TIengen Castle
Location of TIengen Castle
Waldshut-Tiengen
Waldshut-Tiengen (Germany)
Acquired in 1687

Sold in 1812
Gimborn Castle Gimborn Castle in the Rhineland Marienheide, North Rhine-Westphalia
Location of Gimborn Castle
Location of Gimborn Castle
Marienheide
Marienheide (Germany)
From 1631 on the residence in the imperial immediate Dominion of Gimborn of the Schwarzenberg Family

Sold in 1782 to Johann Ludwig, Reichsgraf von Wallmoden-Gimborn

Titles of the family[edit]

Town of Seinsheim (ancestral origin)

Lords of Seinsheim[edit]

The House of Seinsheim regarded Erchanger, Duke of Swabia (died 917), as their ancestor.[15]

Barons of Schwarzenberg[edit]

In 1599, the barony was raised to an Imperial county.

Counts of Schwarzenberg[edit]

On 14 July 1670, the county was raised to an Princely county and, the following year, to a Princely landgraviate.

Arms of the princes of the senior branch
Arms of the princes of the Orlík branch

Princes of Schwarzenberg[edit]

Primogeniture (branch of Krumlov and Hluboká)

Secundogeniture (branch of Orlík)

In November of 1918, the Austro-Hungarian Empire ceased to exist.

Heads of the House of Schwarzenberg (after 1918)[edit]

Primogeniture


Secundogeniture


  • 1979–present: Karel VII, son of Karl VI, adopted by Heinrich, thus unifying both lines

The Dynasty[edit]

The names hereby presented are those of all the direct successors of the Prince John I of Schwarzenberg (1742-1789). They have been respectively divided into the two brenches of Krumlov and Orlik, including the contemporary generations. For the genealogy to be easier to consult, the male successors alone are listed, and they are accompanied with remarkable informations whether necessary. In bold the names of the members of the eldest part of the family.

  • Jan I Nepomuk (1742–1789), 5th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 10th (3rd of his line) Duke of Krumlov
    • A1. Josef II Jan (1769–1833), 6th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 11th (4th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1789–1833), founder of the main branch of the family (that of Frauenberg-Krummau)
      • B1. Jan Adolf II (1799–1888), 7th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 12th (5th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1833–1888)
        • C1. Adolf Josef (1832–1914), 8th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 13th (6th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1888–1914)
          • D1. Jan II Nepomuk (1860–1938), 9th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 14th (7th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1914-1938)
            • E1. Adolph Jan (1890–1950), 10th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 15th (8th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1938–1950)
            • E2. Karl (1892–1919)
            • E3. Edmund Černov (1897–1932), Called "Black Sheep" as a consequence of the refusal of his surname
          • D2. Alois (1863–1937)
          • D3. Felix (1867–1946)
            • E1. Josef III (1900–1979), 11th Prince of Schwarzenberg (1950-1979), last member of the eldest side of the dynasty
            • E2. Heinrich (1903–1965), 16th (9th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1950–1965) (adopted G1. Karel (VII/I))
          • D4. Georg (1867–1952)
          • D5. Karel (1871–1902)
        • C2. Cajus (1839–1941)
      • B2. Felix (1800–1852), Prime Minister of the Austrian Empire
      • B3. Friedrich (1809–1885), Archbishop of Prague
    • A2. Karel I Philipp (1771–1820), Prince of Schwarzenberg, founder and chief of the second line of the family (Orlík)
      • B1. Friedrich (1800–1870), Who renounced his right of majorat in favour of his brother
      • B2. Karel II (1802–1858), Prince of Schwarzenberg
        • C1. Karel III (1824–1904), Prince of Schwarzenberg
          • D1. Karel IV (1859–1913), Prince of Schwarzenberg
            • E1. Karl V (1886–1914), Prince of Schwarzenberg
              • F1. Karel VI (1911–1989), Prince of Schwarzenberg
                • G1. Karel (VII / I) Schwarzenberg (* 1937), 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg (from 1979), 17th (10th considering his original line) Duke of Krumlov (from 1965), Former Minister of the Foreign Affairs and candidate to the head of state for Czech Republic in 2013. He unified the two lines of the family.
                  • H1. Jan Nepomuk (* 1967)
                • G2. Friedrich (* 1940–2014)
                  • H1. Ferdinand (* 1989)
              • F2. Franz Friedrich Maria (1913–1992), Who did strongly oppose the Nazi rule in Bohemia.
                • G1. Jan Nepomuk (* 1957)
                  • H1. Alexander Holden (* 1984)
            • E2. Ernst (1892–1979)
            • E3. Josef (1894–1894)
            • E4. Jan Nepomuk (1903–1978), Austrian Embassador
              • F1. Erkinger (* 1933)
                • G1. Jan (* 1963)
                • G2. Alexandr (* 1971)
                  • H1. Karl Philipp (* 2003)
          • D2. Friedrich (1862–1936)
      • B2. Leopold (1803–1873), Austrian Marshal

Titles of the Members of the Schwarzenberg family[edit]

Styles of
The Prince of Schwarzenberg
Blason Maison de Schwartzenberg.svg
Reference style His Serene Highness
Spoken style Your Serene Highness
Alternative style Sir

The title of the head of the princely family is:

  • HSH The Prince of Schwarzenberg, Duke of Krumlov, Count of Sulz, Princely Landgrave of Klettgau
    • (German: S.D. der Fürst zu Schwarzenberg, Herzog von Krummau, Graf von Sulz, gefürsteter Landgraf im Klettgau)

The title of the wife of the head of the family would be:

  • HSH The Princess of Schwarzenberg, Duchess of Krumlov, Countess of Sulz, Princely Landgravine of Klettgau
    • (German: I.D. die Fürstin zu Schwarzenberg, Herzogin von Krummau, Gräfin von Sulz, gefürstete Landgräfin im Klettgau)

The title of the first born son and heir of the family is:

  • HSH The Hereditary Prince of Schwarzenberg, Duke of Krumlov, Count of Sulz, Landgrave of Klettgau
    • (German: S.D. der Erbprinz zu Schwarzenberg, Herzog von Krummau, Graf von Sulz, Landgraf im Kledage)

The title of the wife of the first born son and heir of the family would be:

  • HSH The Hereditary Princess of Schwarzenberg, Duchess of Krumlov, Countess of Sulz, Landgravine of Klettgau
    • (German: I.D. die Erbprinzessin zu Schwarzenberg, Herzogin von Krummau, Gräfin von Sulz, Landgräfin im Klettgau)

The title of all other female members of the family is:

  • HSH Princess Name of Schwarzenberg, Countess of Sulz, Landgravine of Klettgau
    • (German: I.D. Prinzessin Name zu Schwarzenberg, Gräfin von Sulz, Landgräfin im Klettgau)

The title of all other male members of the family is:

  • HSH Prince Name of Schwarzenberg, Count of Sulz, Landgrave of Klettgau
    • (German: S.D. Prinz Name zu Schwarzenberg, Graf von Sulz, Landgraf im Klettgau)

Although the family is entitled to use the von und zu, only the zu is applied. Moreover, all members of the family are allowed to use the title Fürst / Fürstin. However, this is not anymore practiced since the late 19th century and the cognates refer to themselves as Prinz / Prinzessin.


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