House of Schwarzenberg

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Schwarzenberg
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Arms of the Princes of Schwarzenberg
Parent houseSeinsheim
Country
Ethnicity
Founded
  • 917 Seinsheim (parent house)
  • 1421 Acquisition of Schwarzenberg

FounderErkinger VI of Seinsheim aka Erkinger I of Schwarzenberg
Current headHSH Prince Karl of Schwarzenberg
Final rulerJoseph II, 6th Prince of Schwarzenberg
Titles
Style(s)Serene Highness
MottoNIL NISI RECTUM
(NOTHING BUT THE RIGHT)
Estate(s)
  • Coat of Arms Princely County of Schwarzenberg.jpg Princely County of Schwarzenberg
  • Arms of the Earl of Chester.svg Princely Landgraviate of Klettgau
  • Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg County of Gimborn

Deposition1806: Dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire
Cadet branches
  • Princely Line:
    • Schwarzenberg Primogeniture (Frauenberg)
    • Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture (Orlik)

  • Frisian Line:
    • Barons thoe Schwartzenberg en Hohenlansberg
    • Prussian Line: Freiherrn zu Schwartzenberg und Hohenlansberg

Schwarzenberg is a Czech (Bohemian) and German (Franconian) aristocratic family, and it was one of the most prominent European noble houses. The Schwarzenbergs are members of the Czech nobility and German nobility and achieved the rank of Princes of the Holy Roman Empire. The family belongs to the high nobility and traces its roots to the Lords of Seinsheim during the Middle Ages.[1]

The current head of the family is Karel, the 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg, a Czech politician who served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic. The family owns properties and lands across Austria, Czech Republic, Germany and Switzerland.

History[edit]

Origin[edit]

The family stems from the Lords of Seinsheim, who had established themselves in Franconia during the Middle Ages.[1] A branch of the Seinsheim family (the non-Schwarzenberg portion died out in 1958) was created when Erkinger of Seinsheim acquired the Franconian territory of Schwarzenberg and the castle of Schwarzenberg in Scheinfeld during the early part of the 15th century. He was then granted the title of Freiherr (Baron) of Schwarzenberg in 1429. At that time, the family also possessed some fiefdoms in Bohemia.

Ascent and expansion[edit]

In 1599, the Schwarzenbergs were elevated to Imperial Counts, and the family was later raised to princely status in 1670.[1] In 1623 came the Styrian Dominion of Murau into the Schwarzenberg family due to the marriage of Count Georg Ludwig of Schwarzenberg (1586 - 1646) with Anna Neumann von Wasserleonburg (1535 - 1623). Furthermore, the House of Schwarzenberg acquired extensive land holdings in Bohemia in 1661 through a marriage alliance with the House of Eggenberg. In the 1670s, the Schwarzenbergs established their primary seat in Bohemia and, until 1918, their main residence was in Český Krumlov, Bohemia (now in the Czech Republic).

Schwarzenberg/Sulz family unification[edit]

Due to the absence of a male heir and his only daughter Maria Anna married to Prince Ferdinand of Schwarzenberg, Johann Ludwig II. Count of Sulz proposed a family unification between the Counts of Sulz and Princes of Schwarzenberg at the Imperial Court. His request was granted, which not only transferred all legal and property rights upon his death in 1687 from the Sulz family to the Schwarzenberg family, but assured that the Sulz family continues in the Schwarzenberg family. The visible affirmation of this bond was the merging of the coat of arms.

Two princely lines[edit]

At the beginning of the 19th century, the House of Schwarzenberg was divided into two princely-titled lines (majorats).[1] This division was already foreseen in the will of Prince Ferdinand (*1652 - †1703). However, the absence of two male heirs until Joseph II. and Karl I. Philipp inhibited the execution. The senior branch,which held not only the Palais Schwarzenberg in Vienna, but also the Dominions of Scheinfeld, Krumlov, Frauenberg and Murau, died out in the male line in 1979 upon the death of Joseph III of Schwarzenberg, who was the 11th Prince of Schwarzenberg. The cadet branch, which was established by Karl Philipp, Prince of Schwarzenberg at Orlík Castle, continues to the present day.

The two branches have now been re-united under the current head of the family, Karl VII of Schwarzenberg, who is the 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg. He is a Czech politician and served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic.

Present Time[edit]

Due to the unification of the family-headship under Karl VII Schwarzenberg, the fidei commissa of both the primogeniture / Hluboka line and the secundogeniture / Orlik line came under the single ownership of the last-mentioned prince. Karl VII created in the 1980s the current structure of the family belongings. The German and Austrian properties from the primogeniture were embeded (with some exceptions) into the Fürstlich Schwarzenberg'sche Familienstiftung (Princely Schwarzenberg Family-Foundation) based in Vaduz. The art collection, which includes the painting The Abduction of Ganymede by Peter Paul Rubens or an important collection of works by Johann Georg de Hamilton, is held in the separate Fürstlich Schwarzenberg'sche Kunststiftung (Princely Schwarzenberg Art-Foundation). The Czech property of the secundogeniture is held privately. The members of the family follow careers in the private or military sector.


Frisian and Prussian line[edit]

Michael II. Baron zu Schwarzenberg (†1469), oldest son of Erkinger I. (*1362 - †1437), was married twice. First with Gertrud (Bätze) von Cronberg (†1438), from whom the princely line descends. His second marriage was with Ursula (Frankengrüner) Grüner († ca.1484), from whom the Frisian and later the Prussian line originates. The children of Michael's and Ursula's alliance were never recognized by their half-siblings, as their first born son was born out of wedlock and the legitimisation only took place with the subsequent wedding.

Johann Onuphrius (*1513–†1584), a great-grandson of Michael II. and Ursula, is considered to be the progenitor of the Frisian Line. His marriage with Maria von Grumbach (†1564) ensured Groot Terhorne Castle until 1879 as the family seat in the Netherlands. The Frisian line was made a member of the Dutch nobility by a Royal decree of King William I. of the Netherlands on August 28, 1814. Henceforth, the Dutch version thoe Schwartzenberg en Hohenlansberg was applied for this branch of the family.

The Prussian Line was established as a cadet branch of the Frisian line with Georg Baron thoe Schwartzenberg en Hohenlansberg (1842-1918), who served as a Rittmeister in the Imperial German Army. He and his descendants were made members of the Prussian nobility by an Imperial decree, issued by Emperor Wilhelm II., and are entitled to carry the German title Freiherr.

Imperial immediate estates[edit]

The Schwarzenberg family held three Imperial Immediate Estates in the Holy Roman Empire.

Name Timespan Map Coat of Arms Historic Map
Princely County of Schwarzenberg

Gefürstete Grafschaft Schwarzenberg
1429 - 1806

- Acquired by the Lords of Seinsheim 1405 – 1421
- Imperial immediacy 1429
- Raised to Imperial County 1599
- Raised to Princely County 14 July 1670
- German Mediatisation 1806
Location of Schwarzenberg
Location of Schwarzenberg
Schwarzenberg
Schwarzenberg (Germany)
Princely Hat.svg
Coat of Arms Princely County of Schwarzenberg.jpg
(Princely) County of Schwarzenberg
Princely Landgraviate of Klettgau

Gefürstete Landgrafschaft Klettgau
1410 - 1806

- Transition of the Landgraviate of Klettgau from the Habsburg family to the Sulz family 1410
- Schwarzenberg / Sulz family unification 1687
- Raised to Princely Landgraviate 1687
- German Mediatisation 1806
Location Klettgau
Location Klettgau
Klettgau
Klettgau (Germany)
Princely Hat.svg
Arms of the Earl of Chester.svg
Princely Landgraviate of Klettgau
County of Gimborn

Grafschaft Gimborn
1550 - 1782

- Imperial immediacy 1631
Location of Gimborn
Location of Gimborn
Gimborn
Gimborn (Germany)
Princely Hat.svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
County of Gimborn

By coincidence the coat of arms of the Princely Landgraviate of Klettgau and the Earldom of Buchan in Scotland are the same. The Klettgau coat of arms can be found in the left heart shield of the Schwarzenberg coat of arms.

Notable family members[edit]

The House of Schwarzenberg produced many military commanders, politicians, church dignitaries (including a Cardinal), innovators and patrons of the arts.[1] They were related to a number of European aristocratic families, notably the Lobkowicz (Czech: Lobkovicové) family. Some of the most noteworthy members of the Schwarzenberg family are:

Name Portrait Arms Office(s) Marriage(s)
Issue
Comments
Erkinger VI of Seinsheim, 1st Baron of Schwarzenberg
1362

11 December 1437
Erkinger Schwarzenberg Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
Grand Master of the Hunt at the Court of the Bishopric of Würzburg I. Anna von Bibra
1348

1408
Six children

II. Barbara von Abensberg
1383

2 November 1448
Eleven children
Founder of the Schwarzenberg family

Member of the Imperial Council

Military commander in the Hussite Wars
Johann, Baron of Schwarzenberg
Johann the Strong
25 December 1463

21 October 1528
Johann Schwarzenberg by Albrecht Duerer Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Judge of the episcopal court at Bamberg Kunigunde, Countess of Rieneck
28 September 1469

18 October 1502
twelve children
Friend of Martin Luther, and author of the Constitutio Criminalis Bambergensis, which was the basis for the Constitutio Criminalis Carolina
Wilhelm I, Baron of Schwarzenberg
1486

KIA 1526
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Field marshal Katharina Wilhelmina von Nesselrode
?

6 December 1567
two sons
Field marshal of the Holy Roman Empire under Emperor Charles V in:
German Peasants' War
Guelders Wars
Otto Heinrich, Count of Schwarzenberg
Known among his contemporaries as inter viros sui temporis illustres illustrissimus
1535

11 August 1590
Schwarzenberg, Otto Heinrich; 1535-1590.jpg Schwartzenberg CoA.jpg President of the Aulic Council
Hofmarschall of the HRR
by his Imp. Maj. decreed Guardian and Governor in Baden
Elisa Margareta von Wolff Metternich
?

6 February 1624
one son
Guardian and Governor in Baden for Margrave Philip II of Baden

President of the Aulic Council and Hofmarschall of the HRR under Maximilian II and Rudolf II
Melchior, Baron of Schwarzenberg
ca. 1536

KIA 29 June 1579
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Military Commander
Military Governor
Anne de Merode-Houffalize
ca. 1530

1580
Commander of the Dutch States Party military forces in the Siege of Maastricht and Military Governor of Maastricht
Adolf, Count of Schwarzenberg
ca. 1547

29 July 1600
Schwarzenberg, Adolph; 1547-1600 (2).jpg Crown of a Count of France (variant).svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Field marshal Elisa Margareta von Wolff Metternich
?

6 February 1624
one son
Field marshal of the Holy Roman Empire and liberator of Győr (German: Raab)
Adam, Count of Schwarzenberg
1583

14 March 1641
1583-1641 Schwarzenberg, Adam.jpg Crown of a Count of France (variant).svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Herrenmeister (Grand Master)
Political advisor
Margareta, Freiin von Palant von Larochette und Moestroff
?

29 September 1615
two sons
Advisor of George William, Elector of Brandenburg, Herrenmeister (Grand Master) of the Order of Saint John

Son of Adolf, Count of Schwarzenberg
Georg Ludwig, Count of Schwarzenberg
24 December 1586

22 July 1646
Schwartzenberg CoA.jpg Statesman I. Anna Neumann von Wasserleonburg
25 November 1536

18 December 1623
no issue

II. Maria Elisabeth Countess of Sulz
1587

12 December 1651
two sons
Austrian statesman during the Thirty Years War

Through his marriage with Anna Neumann came the Dominion of Murau into the Schwarzenberg family
Ferdinand, 2nd Prince of Schwarzenberg
The Plague King
23 May 1652

22 October 1703
Ferdinand Schwarzenberg.jpg Princely Hat.svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Oberhofmarschall
Oberhofmeister
Maria Anna Countess of Sulz
ca. 1660

18 July 1698
eleven children
Oberhofmarschall and Oberhofmeister, known as the Plague King (Pestkönig)
Adam Franz, 3rd Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
25 September 1680

11 Juni 1732
Adam František Schwarzenberg.jpg Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg Obersthofmarschall (1711–1722)
Oberstallmeister (1722–1732)
Eleonore Princess of Lobkowicz
20 June 1682

5 May 1741
two children
First Duke of Krumlov, Count of Sulz and Princely Landgrave of Klettgau in the Schwarzenberg family

Initiator of the Schwarzenberg Navigational Canal

Killed accidentally by Emperor Charles VI during a driven shoot
Joseph I, 4th Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
15 December 1722

17 February 1782
Schwarzenberg, Joseph Adam.jpg Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg Obersthofmeister Maria Theresia Princess von und zu Liechtenstein
28 December 1721

19 January 1753
nine children
Obersthofmeister of Empress Maria Theresia, Minister of State, receives the Order of the Golden Fleece at the age of ten
Joseph II, 6th Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
27 June 1769

19 December 1833
Schwarzenberg, Joseph II Johann; 1789-1833.jpg Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg Ambassador Pauline Princess of Arenberg-Aarschot
2 September 1774

burned to death in the night of 1st to the 2nd July 1810
nine children
Ambassador of the Austrian Empire in Paris

Last Prince of Schwarzenberg, who possessed the imperial immediacy

Founder of the Schwarzenberg Primogeniture
Karl Philipp Prince of Schwarzenberg
15 April 1771

15 October 1820
Karel Filip Schwarzenberg.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
K.u.k. Feldmarschall.png
Field marshal
Ambassador
Maria Anna Countess von Hohenfeld
widowed Princess Esterházy
20 May 1768

2 April 1848
three sons
Austrian field marshal during the Napoleonic Wars and ambassador in St.Petersburg and Paris, Generalissimo of the Sixth Coalition in the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig

Founder of the Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture
Ernst Prince of Schwarzenberg
29 May 1773

14 March 1821
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg Bishop - Canon of Cologne, Liège, Salzburg, Passau, Esztergom and Bishop of Győr
Prince Felix of Schwarzenberg
The Austrian Bismarck
2 October 1800

5 April 1852
Prince Felix of Schwarzenberg, Austrian statesman Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg Minister-President
Minister of Foreign Affairs

K.u.k. Feldmarschalleutnant.png
Field Marshal Lieutenant
Two children with Jane Digby, Lady Ellenborough Minister-President of the Austrian Empire between 1848 and 1852
Friedrich Prince of Schwarzenberg
The Lansquenet
30 September 1800

6 March 1870
Friedrich Karl Schwarzenberg 1854 Litho.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
K.u.k. Generalmajor.png
Major General
Writer
- Major general of the Austrian Empire, Colonel of the General Staff in the Spanish First Carlist War, officer in the Swiss Sonderbund War and author, known as der Landsknecht (the Lansquenet)
Karl II Prince of Schwarzenberg
The Governor
21 January 1802

25 June 1858
Karl II Schwarzenberg 1850 Litho.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
K.u.k. Feldzeugmeister.png
General of the branch
(Military) Governor
Josephine Countess Wratislaw of Mitrovic
16 April 1802

17 April 1881
one son
General of the branch of the Austrian Empire, Military Governor of Milan and Governor of the Principality of Transylvania (today Romania), known as der Gouverneur (the governor)
Edmund Prince of Schwarzenberg
18 November 1803

17 November 1873
Emund Schwarzenberg.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
K.u.k. Feldmarschall.png
Field marshal
- Last Austrian field marshal in the 19th century
Friedrich Prince of Schwarzenberg
6 April 1809

27 March 1885
Schwarzenberg.jpg COA cardinal AT Schwarzenberg Friedrich Joseph.png Cardinal
Archbishop
Primas Germaniae
Prince of the Church
- Cardinal and Archbishop of Salzburg, then Archbishop of Prague
Felix Prince of Schwarzenberg
8 June 1867

18 November 1946
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg K.u.k. Generalmajor.png
Major general
Anna Princess zu Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg
28 September 1873

27 June 1936
five children
Major general in World War I, one of only two recipients of the Golden Medal of Bravery for Officers by Emperor Charles I.
Heinrich Prince of Schwarzenberg
Duke of Krumlov
29 January 1903

18 June 1965
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg Public servant Eleonore Countess zu Stolberg-Stolberg
8 August 1920

27 Dezember 1994
one daughter
Austrian public servant and survivor of the Buchenwald concentration camp
Johannes Prince of Schwarzenberg
31 January 1903

26 May 1978
Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Public servant Kathleen Vicomtesse de Spoelberch
19 May 1905

26 May 1978
two children
Austrian ambassador in Italy (1947–1955), to the Holy See (1955–1966) and Ambassador to the Court of St James's (1966–1969), Director and Delegate of the Red Cross and member of the Governing Board
Karl VI, Prince of Schwarzenberg
5 July 1911

9 April 1986
Karl VI zu Schwarzenberg.jpg Princely hat (flat).svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Officer
Regent
Author
Antonia Princess zu Fürstenberg
12 January 1905

24 December 1988
four children
Czech resistance fighter in World War II, Regent of the Grand Priory of Bohemia of the Order of Malta, historian and author
Karl, 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg
10 December 1937
Karel Schwarzenberg on June 2, 2011.jpg Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg President of the Council of the European Union
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Vice prime minister
Senator
Therese Countess zu Hardegg auf Glatz und im Machlande
17 February 1940

two children
Czech politician, former Minister of Foreign Affairs (Czech Republic) and current head of the House of Schwarzenberg

Property and residences[edit]

Coat of arms of Germany.svg Germany[edit]

The Schwarzenberg family holding included the following residences in Germany:

Name Image Location Map Comments
Schwarzenberg Castle Schloß Schwarzenberg at Scheinfeld, Franconia DEU Scheinfeld COA.svg
Scheinfeld, Franconia
Location of Scheinfeld
Location of Scheinfeld
Scheinfeld
Scheinfeld (Germany)
Ancestral seat

Held to present
Hohenlandsberg Castle Hohenlandsberg Castle at Weigenheim, Middle Franconia DEU Weigenheim COA.svg
Weigenheim, Franconia
Location of Weigenheim
Location of Weigenheim
Weigenheim
Weigenheim (Germany)
Acquired in 1436.

Later main seat of the Schwarzenberg-Hohenlandsberg line

Reconstructed in 1511 - 1524

Destroyed in 1554 during the Second Margrave War.
Palais Schwarzenberg (Frickenhausen am Main) Palais Schwarzenberg at Frickenhausen am Main, Lower Franconia Wappen von Frickenhausen am Main.svg
Frickenhausen am Main, Lower Franconia
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg
Palais Schwarzenberg
Palais Schwarzenberg (Germany)
Wässerndorf Castle Wässerndorf, Schloßstraße 1-003.jpg DEU Seinsheim COA.svg
Wässerndorf in Seinsheim, Lower Franconia
Location of Wässerndorf Castle
Location of Wässerndorf Castle
Wässerndorf
Wässerndorf (Germany)
In the 12th centruty, the family (still known as Seinsheim / de Sovensheim) served as the ministerialis in Wässerndorf.

From 1263, it served as the main seat of the Seinsheim family.

After the line Seinsheim-Westerndorf died out, the castle came in 1550 in full possession of Count Friedrich zu Schwarzenberg, who rebuilt the castle from 1555 onwards.

From 1910 onwards, the family ′′′von Pölnitz′′′ lived in the castle.

The castle was burned down by American troups on the 5. April 1945.
Seehaus Castle DEU Markt Nordheim COA.svg
Markt Nordheim, Middle Franconia
Location of Seehaus Castle
Location of Seehaus Castle
Seehaus
Seehaus (Germany)
Acquired in 1655. Held until the German land reform in 1947.
Schnodsenbach Castle Scheinfeld, Schnodsenbach, Schloss, 001.jpg DEU Scheinfeld COA.svg
Frickenhausen am Main, Middle Franconia
Location of Schnodsenbach Castle
Location of Schnodsenbach Castle
Schnodsenbach
Schnodsenbach (Germany)
Held from 1789 - 1816
Gimborn Castle Gimborn Castle in the Rhineland DEU Marienheide COA.svg
Marienheide, North Rhine-Westphalia
Location of Gimborn Castle
Location of Gimborn Castle
Marienheide
Marienheide (Germany)
From 1631 on the residence in the imperial immediate Dominion of Gimborn of the Schwarzenberg Family

Sold in 1782 to Johann Ludwig, Reichsgraf von Wallmoden-Gimborn
Tiengen Castle Tiengen WT Schloss.JPG DEU Waldshut-Tiengen COA.svg
Waldshut-Tiengen, Baden-Württemberg
Location of Tiengen Castle
Location of Tiengen Castle
Waldshut-Tiengen
Waldshut-Tiengen (Germany)
Acquired in 1687

Sold in 1812
Küssaburg Castle Küssaburg Bechtersbohl ReiKi.JPG DEU Küssaberg COA.svg
Küssaberg, Baden-Württemberg
Location of Küssaburg Castle
Location of Küssaburg Castle
Küssaburg
Küssaburg (Germany)
Acquired in 1497 trough the Sulz ancestors

Destroyed but kept as a ruin in 1634

Sold in 1812
Jestetten Castle

Oberes Schloss
DEU Jestetten COA.svg
Jestetten, Baden-Württemberg
Location of Jestetten Castle
Location of Jestetten Castle
Jestetten Castle
Jestetten Castle (Germany)
Acquired in 1488 through Count Alwig X. von Sulz

Second main residence of the Sulz family after Tiengen

Became a part of the Schwarzenberg property through the family-unification

Sold together with the entire Principality
Jestetten Fortress

Unteres Schloss

Greuthsches Schlösschen
DEU Jestetten COA.svg
Jestetten, Baden-Württemberg
Location of Jestetten Castle
Location of Jestetten Castle
Jestetten Castle
Jestetten Castle (Germany)
Acquired in 1707

Sold together with the entire Principality


Willmendingen Castle Schloss Willmendingen.jpg Wappen Wutoeschingen.svg
Wutöschingen, Baden-Württemberg
Location of Willmendingen Castle
Location of Willmendingen Castle
Willmendingen Castle
Willmendingen Castle (Germany)
Acquired in 1801

Sold in 1812

Small coat of arms of the Czech Republic.svg Bohemia[edit]

The Schwarzenberg Estate in South Bohemia in 1840

The Schwarzenberg land holdings in Bohemia included the Duchy of Krumlov, the town of Prachatice and Orlík Castle. The family also acquired the property of the House of Rosenberg (Czech: Rožmberkové). On their lands, the Schwarzenbergs created ponds, planted forests and introduced new technologies in agriculture.[1]

Upon the establishment of the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia in 1939, the possessions of Prince Adolph of Schwarzenberg were seized by the Nazi authorities. He managed to flee, but his cousin Heinrich, Duke of Krumlov, was arrested and deported. After World War II, the Czechoslovakian government stated, by law No. 143/1947 from August 13, 1947 (Lex Schwarzenberg), that the assets of the Schwarzenberg-Hluboká primogeniture passed to the Land of Bohemia.[1]

The Schwarzenberg family holding included the following residences in Bohemia:

Name Image Location Map Comments
Krumlov Castle
Krumau Castle
Český Krumlov Castle CZ Český Krumlov COA.svg
Český Krumlov, South Bohemia
Location of Český Krumlov Castle
Location of Český Krumlov Castle
Český Krumlov
Český Krumlov (Czech Republic)
Held from 1719 until the expropriation in 1947

UNESCO World Heritage Site

One of the largest castles in the world
Hluboká Castle
Frauenberg Castle
Hluboká nad Vltavou, zámek.jpg Hluboká nad Vltavou znak.png
Hluboká nad Vltavou, South Bohemia
Location of Hluboká Castle
Location of Hluboká Castle
Hluboká nad Vltavou
Hluboká nad Vltavou (Czech Republic)
Acquired by Johann Adolf I of Schwarzenberg in 1661

Held until the expropriation in 1947

One of the finest examples of Neo-Tudor architecture in Historicism
Vimperk Castle
Winterberg Castle
Zámek Vimperk 02.JPG Vimperk znak.png
Vimperk, South Bohemia
Location of Vimperk Castle
Location of Vimperk Castle
Vimperk
Vimperk (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1698

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Třeboň Castle
Wittingau Castle
Zámek Třeboň, Třeboň 111.JPG Znak mesta trebon II.svg
Třeboň, South Bohemia
Location of Třeboň Castle
Location of Třeboň Castle
Třeboň
Třeboň (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1698

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Protivín Castle Protivínský zámek.jpg Znak Mesta Protivin.jpg
Protivín, South Bohemia
Location of Protivín Castle
Location of Protivín Castle
Protivín
Protivín (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1711

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Kratochvíle Castle
Kurzweil Castle
9.7.16 Kratochvile Namesticko 12 (27595210194).jpg Netolice, South Bohemia
Location of Kratochvíle Castle
Location of Kratochvíle Castle
Kratochvíle
Kratochvíle (Czech Republic)
Inherited in 1719 from the Princes of Eggenberg

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Červený Dvůr Castle
Rothenhof Castle
Schloss-Rothenhof-03.jpg Chvalšiny CZ CoA.gif
Chvalšiny, South Bohemia
Location of Chvalšiny
Location of Chvalšiny
Chvalšiny
Chvalšiny (Czech Republic)
Inherited in 1719 from the Princes of Eggenberg

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Borovany Castle
Forbes Castle
Borovany zámek 1.jpg Borovany.jpg
Borovany, South Bohemia
Location of Borovany
Location of Borovany
Borovany
Borovany (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1789 in exchange for the Dominion of Vlčice (German: Wildschütz)

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Dříteň Castle
Zirnau Castle
Dříteň, zámek 01 crop.jpg Driten CZ CoA.png
Dříteň, South Bohemia
Location of Dříteň Castle
Location of Dříteň Castle
Dříteň
Dříteň (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1698

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Drslavice Fortress
Drislawitz Fortress
Tvrz Drslavice.JPG Drslavice, South Bohemia
Location of Drslavice Fortress
Location of Drslavice Fortress
Drslavice
Drslavice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1698

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Kestřany Castle
Kesterschan Castle
Kestřany, zámek (5).jpg Kestrany CZ CoA.jpg
Kestřany, South Bohemia
Location of Kestřany Castle
Location of Kestřany Castle
Kestřany
Kestřany (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1700

Held until the First Land Reform in 1924
Old Libějovice Castle Libějovice (okres Strakonice) (04).jpg Libějovice CoA.jpg
Libějovice, South Bohemia
Location of Old Libějovice Castle
Location of Old Libějovice Castle
Libějovice
Libějovice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1801

Held until the expropriation in 1947
New Libějovice Castle Libějovice (okres Strakonice) (25).jpg Libějovice CoA.jpg
Libějovice, South Bohemia
Location of New Libějovice Castle
Location of New Libějovice Castle
Libějovice
Libějovice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1801

Rebuilt between 1816 - 1817

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Ohrada Castle
Wohrad Castle
Lovecký zámek Ohrada - průčelí.jpg Hluboká nad Vltavou znak.png
Hluboká nad Vltavou, South Bohemia
Location of Ohrada Castle
Location of Ohrada Castle
Hluboká nad Vltavou
Hluboká nad Vltavou (Czech Republic)
Built between 1708 - 1713

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Chýnov Chýnov znak.png
Chýnov, South Bohemian Region
Location of Chýnov Castle
Location of Chýnov Castle
Chýnov
Chýnov (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1719

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Postoloprty
Postelberg Castle
Postoloprty zamek.JPG Postoloprty CZ CoA.jpg
Postoloprty, North Bohemia
Location of Postoloprty Castle
Location of Postoloprty Castle
Postoloprty
Postoloprty (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1692

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Nový Hrad
Neuschloß Castle
Zámek Nový Hrad (Jimlín).jpg Znak obce Jimlín.gif
Jimlín, Ústí nad Labem Region
Location of Nový Hrad Castle
Location of Nový Hrad Castle
Nový Hrad
Nový Hrad (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1767

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Lovosice
Lobositz Castle
Lobositz-Schloss.jpg Lovosice-coat of arms.png
Lovosice, Ústí nad Labem Region
Location of Lovosice Castle
Location of Lovosice Castle
Lovosice
Lovosice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1783

Original seat of the Schwarzenberg Archives

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Cítoliby
Zittolieb or Zitolib Castle
Cítoliby zámek.JPG Cítoliby znak.jpg
Cítoliby, North Bohemia
Location of Cítoliby Castle
Location of Cítoliby Castle
Cítoliby
Cítoliby (Czech Republic)
Acquired on the 6. s 1803

Held until the First Land Reform in 1924
Domoušice
Domauschitz Castle
Domoušice zámek1.JPG Domoušice CoA.jpg
Domoušice, North Bohemia
Location of Domoušice Castle
Location of Domoušice Castle
Domoušice
Domoušice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1802

Held until the First Land Reform in 1924
Mšec
Kornhauz Castle
Msec-2017-11-04-ZamekOdZapadu.jpg Msec znak.jpg
Mšec, North Bohemia
Location of Mšec Castle
Location of Mšec Castle
Mšec
Mšec (Czech Republic)
Held until the expropriation in 1947
Orlík Castle
Worlik Castle
Orlík 7.jpg Orlík nad Vltavou znak.png
Orlík nad Vltavou, South Bohemia
Location of Orlík Castle
Location of Orlík Castle
Orlík nad Vltavou
Orlík nad Vltavou (Czech Republic)
Main residence of the Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture

Restored in 1992

Held to present

Publicly accessible
Čimelice Castle Čimelice. Zámek. (26).jpg Cimelice erb.png
Čimelice, South Bohemia
Location of Čimelice
Location of Čimelice
Čimelice
Čimelice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1840 through the marriage of Karl II Schwarzenberg with Josefina Marie Wratislaw of Mitrovic

Spring and summer residence of the Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture

Restored in 1992

Held to present
Karlov Castle Zámek Karlov (SMETANOVA LHOTA).jpg Smetanova Lhota CoA.jpg
Karlov (Smetanova Lhota), South Bohemia
Location of Karlov Castle
Location of Karlov Castle
Karlov
Karlov (Czech Republic)
Restored in 1992

Held to present
Varvažov Castle
Warwaschau Castle
Zámek Varvažov (3).jpg Varvažov, South Bohemia
Location of Varvažov Castle
Location of Varvažov Castle
Varvažov
Varvažov (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1847 from the Sovereign Military Order of Malta

Restored in 1992

Held to present
Rakovice Castle Rakovice okres Písek (9.).jpg Rakovice CoA.jpg
Rakovice, South Bohemia
Location of Rakovice
Location of Rakovice
Rakovice
Rakovice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1840 through the marriage of Karl II Schwarzenberg with Josefina Marie Wratislaw of Mitrovic

Restored in 1992

Held to present
Sedlec Castle
Sedletz Castle
Severní fasáda zámku.JPG COA Kutna Hora.png
Sedlec in the town of Kutná Hora, Central Bohemia
Location of Sedlec Castle
Location of Sedlec Castle
Sedlec
Sedlec (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1819 from the Cistercians

Restored in 1992

Held to present
Dřevíč Castle
Grund Castle
Sýkořice, Dřevíč, od brány.jpg Sýkořice CoA.jpg
Sýkořice, Central Bohemian Region
Location of Dřevíč Castle
Location of Dřevíč Castle
Dřevíč Castle
Dřevíč Castle (Czech Republic)
Built by Joseph Wilhelm Ernst, Prince of Fürstenberg in the first half of the 18th century

Sold by Maximilian Egon II, Prince of Fürstenberg to Czechoslovakia

Acquired by Karel Schwarzenberg in 1991

Held to present
Hunting lodge Tyrolský dům
Tiroler Haus
Tyrolský dům - Rukávečská též Květovská obora (okres Písek) (9).JPG Květov, South Bohemia
Location of Tyrolský dům
Location of Tyrolský dům
Květov
Květov (Czech Republic)
Restored in 1992

Held to present
Tochovice Castle Tochovice castle.JPG Tochovice CoA.jpg
Tochovice, South Bohemia
Location of Tochovice Castle
Location of Tochovice Castle
Tochovice
Tochovice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1840 through the marriage of Karl II Schwarzenberg with Josefina Marie Wratislaw of Mitrovic

Restored in 1992

Seat of Ernst Schwarzenberg's descendants

Held to present
Zbenice Castle Zbenice - okres Příbram (07).jpg Coats of arms Zbenice.png
Zbenice, Central Bohemian Region
Location of Zbenice Castle
Location of Zbenice Castle
Zbenice
Zbenice (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1805 through Karl I. Schwarzenberg

Held until 1948
Bukovany Castle
Schloss Bukowan
Dětská léčebna Bukovany 02.JPG Bukovany-znak.jpg
Bukovany u Kozárovic, Central Bohemian Region
Location of Bukovany Castle
Location of Bukovany Castle
Bukovany
Bukovany (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1816 through Karl I. Schwarzenberg

Held until the First Land Reform in 1925
Zalužany Castle Zalužany castle.JPG Zalužany, South Bohemia
Location of Zalužany Castle
Location of Zalužany Castle
Zalužany
Zalužany (Czech Republic)
Held until the First Land Reform in 1924
Osov Castle Osov8.jpg Osov.svg
Osov, South Bohemia
Location of Osov Castle
Location of Osov Castle
Osov
Osov (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1840. Held until the land reform in 1927.
Zvíkov Castle
Zwingenberg Castle
Zvíkov 4.jpg Znak zvikovske podhradi.png
Zvíkovské Podhradí, South Bohemia
Location of Zvíkov Castle
Location of Zvíkov Castle
Zvíkov
Zvíkov (Czech Republic)
Publicly accessible
Palais Schwarzenberg
Schwarzenberský palác
Schwarzenberský.JPG Prague CoA CZ.svg
Prague
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg
Prague
Prague (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1719

Held until the expropriation in 1947

Publicly accessible
Palais Salm
Salmovský palác
Small Palais Schwarzenberg
Salmovský palác zepředu.jpg Prague CoA CZ.svg
Prague
Location of Palais Salm
Location of Palais Salm
Prague
Prague (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1811

Held until the expropriation in 1947
Palais Deym
Deymův palác
Deymův palác z Voršilské.JPG Prague CoA CZ.svg
Prague
Location of Palais Deym
Location of Palais Deym
Prague
Prague (Czech Republic)
Acquired in 1845

Prague seat of the Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture

Held to present

Coat of arms of Austria.svg Austria[edit]

The Schwarzenberg family holdings included the following residences in Austria:

Name Image Location Map Comments
Palais Schwarzenberg Palais Schwarzenberg.jpg Wien 3 Wappen.svg
Schwarzenbergplatz, Landstraße, Vienna
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Schwarzenbergplatz)
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Schwarzenbergplatz)
Vienna
Vienna (Austria)
Acquired in 1716

In the James Bond movie The Living Daylights it served as a film set

Held to present
Palais Schwarzenberg Rudolf Ritter von Alt 009.jpg Wien 3 Wappen.svg
Neuer Markt, Innere Stadt, Vienna
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Neuer Markt)
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Neuer Markt)
Vienna
Vienna (Austria)
Acquired in 1688

1894 demolished
Neuwaldegg Castle
Villa Schwarzenberg
Schloss Neuwaldegg 7.JPG Wien 3 Wappen.svg
Hernals, Vienna
Location of Neuwaldegg Castle
Location of Neuwaldegg Castle
Vienna
Vienna (Austria)
Acquired in 1801

Sold in 1951
Palais Schwarzenberg Laxenburg-Barmherzige Schwestern 8712.JPG Laxenburg Wappen.png
Laxenburg, Lower Austria
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Laxenburg)
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Laxenburg)
Laxenburg
Laxenburg (Austria)
Acquired in 1703

Architect was Johann Lukas von Hildebrandt

Sold in 1850
Palais Schwarzenberg Bürgergasse L1260376a.jpg AUT Graz COA.svg
Graz, Styria
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Neuer Markt)
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg (Neuer Markt)
Graz
Graz (Austria)
Acquired in 1775

Sold in 1853/54
Murau Castle
Obermurau Castle
Murau Styria.jpg AUT Murau COA.jpg
Murau, Styria
Location of Murau Castle
Location of Murau Castle
Murau
Murau (Austria)
Publicly accessible on appointment

Held to present
Grünfels Castle
Old Castle
Gruenfels murau 2006.jpg AUT Murau COA.jpg
Murau, Styria
Location of Grünfels Castle
Location of Grünfels Castle
Murau
Murau (Austria)
Held to present
Wintergrün Castle AT-24389 Ramingstein Schloss Wintergrün 01.jpg Wappen at ramingstein.png
Ramingstein, Salzburg
Location of Wintergrün Castle
Location of Wintergrün Castle
Ramingstein
Ramingstein (Austria)
Held to present
Schrattenberg Castle 273 Das hochfürstliche Schwarzenbergische Schloss Schrattenberg, Kreis Judenburg, gez. von S. Kölbl - J.F.Kaiser Lithografirte Ansichten der Steiermark 1830.jpg AUT Scheifling COA.jpg
Scheifling, Styria
Location of Schrattenberg Castle
Location of Schrattenberg Castle
Schrattenberg
Schrattenberg (Austria)
Acquired by Prince Ferdinand in 1704

Main residence of the Schwarzenberg family in the Murtal until its destruction

Total destruction through a fire, which occurred during restoration works, in 1915

Held to present
Katsch Castle Vischer - Topographia Ducatus Stiria - 200 Katsch bei Murau.jpg AUT Teufenbach-Katsch COA.png
Teufenbach-Katsch, Styria
Location of Katsch Castle
Location of Katsch Castle
Katsch
Katsch (Austria)
Acquired in 1697

Partial deconstruction in 1838

Total destruction in 1858

Held to present
Gusterheim Castle Pöls-Allerheiligen - Schloss Gusterheim - 2.jpg WappenPoels.jpg
Pöls, Styria
Location of Gusterheim Castle
Location of Gusterheim Castle
Pöls
Pöls (Austria)
Acquired in 1698 by Prince Ferdinand together with the Dominions Reifenstein and Offenburg.

The daughter of Prince Heinrich, Elisabeth von Pezold, Princess of Schwarzenberg, inherited the castle.

Held to present by the Pezold family
Ratzenegg Castle Markus Pernhart - Ratzenegg.jpg Wappen at moosburg.png
Moosburg, Carinthia
Location of Ratzenegg Castle
Location of Ratzenegg Castle
Moosburg
Moosburg (Austria)
Seat of the descendents of Prince Erkinger

Held to present
Tschakathurn Castle
Schachenthurn Castle
Schachenturm Castle
Sankt Lorenzen bei Scheifling - Ruine Tschakathurn.jpg AUT Scheifling COA.jpg
Scheifling, Styria
Location of Tschakathurn Castle
Location of Tschakathurn Castle
Tschakathurn
Tschakathurn (Austria)
Acquired in 1740

Total destruction through a fire in 1792

The daughter of Prince Johann II., Countess Ida Revertera von Salandra, Princess of Schwarzenberg, inherited the castle.

Held to present by the Revertera family
Goppelsbach Castle 065 Schloss Goppelsbach, Stadl an der Mur, S. Kölbl - J.F.Kaiser Lithografirte Ansichten der Steiermark 1830.jpg AUT Stadl-Predlitz COA.png
Stadl-Predlitz, Styria
Location of Goppelsbach Castle
Location of Goppelsbach Castle
Goppelsbach
Goppelsbach (Austria)
Acquired in 1839

Sold in 1938

Ecclesiastical buildings and places[edit]

The following religious places are linked to the Schwarzenberg family either as burial or memorial places:

Name Image Location Map Comments
Astheim Charterhouse Astheim Charterhouse DEU Volkach COA.svg
Volkach, Franconia
Location of Volkach
Location of Volkach
Volkach
Volkach (Germany)
Founded by Erkinger, 1st Baron of Schwarzenberg in 1409

First burial site of the Schwarzenberg family
Schwarzenberg Monastery Astheim Charterhouse DEU Scheinfeld COA.svg
Scheinfeld, Franconia
Location of Schwarzenberg Monastery
Location of Schwarzenberg Monastery
Schwarzenberg Monastery
Schwarzenberg Monastery (Germany)
Founded in 1702
St. Vitus Cathedral

Schwarzenberg Chapel
Schwarzenberg Chapel Prague CoA CZ.svg
Prague, Czech Republic
Location of St. Vitus Cathedral
Location of St. Vitus Cathedral
Prague
Prague (Czech Republic)
Located in the St. Vitus Cathedral.
Schwarzenberg Crypt (Domanín) Schwarzenberg Crypt (Domanín) Domanín (okres Jindřichův Hradec) znak.jpg
Domanín (Jindřichův Hradec District), Czech Republic
Location of Schwarzenberg Crypt (Domanín)
Location of Schwarzenberg Crypt (Domanín)
Schwarzenberg Crypt (Domanín)
Schwarzenberg Crypt (Domanín) (Czech Republic)
Constructed from 1874 - 1877.

Burial site of the Schwarzenberg Primogeniture.
Schwarzenberg Crypt (Orlík nad Vltavou) Schwarzenberg Crypt (Orlík nad Vltavou) Orlík nad Vltavou znak.png
Orlík nad Vltavou, Czech Republic
Location of Schwarzenberg Crypt (Orlík nad Vltavou)
Location of Schwarzenberg Crypt (Orlík nad Vltavou)
Schwarzenberg Crypt (Orlík nad Vltavou)
Schwarzenberg Crypt (Orlík nad Vltavou) (Czech Republic)
Burial site of the Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture.

In family possession

Active in use and not open to the public.
Sedlec Ossuary Schwarzenberg Coat of Arms in Sedlec Ossuary COA Kutna Hora.png
Kutná Hora, Czech Republic
Location of Sedlec Ossuary in Kutná Hora
Location of Sedlec Ossuary in Kutná Hora
Sedlec Ossuary in Kutná Hora
Sedlec Ossuary in Kutná Hora (Czech Republic)
Part of the World Heritage Site Sedlec Abbey

Large Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture coat of arms made out of human bones.
Zlatá Koruna Monastery

Goldenkorn Monastery
Zlata Koruna Monastery.jpg CZ Zlatá Koruna COA.svg
Zlatá Koruna, Czech Republic
Location of Zlatá Koruna Monastery
Location of Zlatá Koruna Monastery
Zlatá Koruna Monastery
Zlatá Koruna Monastery (Czech Republic)
Founded by King Ottokar II of Bohemia in 1263.

The Schwarzenberg family inherited in 1719 the Jus patronatus of the Eggenberg family.

In 1785, the family acquired the monastery after its closure due to the Josephinist Reform.

It was used as a manufacture until 1909.

It was confiscated under the Lex Schwarzenberg in 1948.
Vyšší Brod Monastery

Goldenkorn Monastery
382 73 Vyšší Brod, Czech Republic - panoramio (10).jpg Vyšší Brod znak.png
Vyšší Brod, Czech Republic
Location of Vyšší Brod Monastery
Location of Vyšší Brod Monastery
Vyšší Brod Monastery
Vyšší Brod Monastery (Czech Republic)
Founded by Wok I. von Rosenberg in 1259.

The Schwarzenberg family inherited in 1719 the Jus patronatus of the Eggenberg family and kept it for more than a century until 1822.
St. Laurentius Church Tomb of Rittmeister Friedrich Prinz zu Schwarzenberg DEU Weinheim COA.svg
Weinheim, Germany
Location of St. Laurentius Church
Location of St. Laurentius Church
St. Laurentius Church
St. Laurentius Church (Germany)
Tomb of Rittmeister Friedrich Prinz zu Schwarzenberg.
All Saints' Church, Wittenberg Schwarzenberg Coat of Arms in Sedlec Ossuary Wappen Wittenberg.png
Wittenberg, Germany
Location of All Saints' Church, Wittenberg
Location of All Saints' Church, Wittenberg
All Saints' Church, Wittenberg
All Saints' Church, Wittenberg (Germany)
World Heritage Site

Site where the Ninety-five Theses were likely posted by Martin Luther in 1517.

Schwarzenberg coat of arms on the balustrade of the organ to commemorate Johann of Schwarzenberg as one of Luther's first followers.

Monuments and memorials[edit]

The following monuments are erected for the Schwarzenberg family and its members:

Name Picture Map Comment
Schwarzenbergplatz Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg
Location of Schwarzenbergplatz
Location of Schwarzenbergplatz
Schwarzenbergplatz
Schwarzenbergplatz (Austria)
Inaugurated in 1867

Commemorating the victory of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg at the Battle of the Nations in 1813
Monument to the Battle of the Nations Monument to the Battle of the Nations
Location of Monument to the Battle of the Nations
Location of Monument to the Battle of the Nations
Monument to the Battle of the Nations
Monument to the Battle of the Nations (Germany)
Inaugurated in 1913

Commemorating the victory (of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg) at the Battle of the Nations in 1813

Length: 80 metres (260 ft)
Width: 70 metres (230 ft)
Height: 91 metres (299 ft)
Schwarzenberg-Pálffy Monument Schwarzenberg-Pálffy Monument
Location of the Schwarzenberg-Pálffy Monument
Location of the Schwarzenberg-Pálffy Monument
Schwarzenberg-Pálffy Monument
Schwarzenberg-Pálffy Monument (Hungary)
Inaugurated in 1998

Commemorating the victory at the Battle of Györ of Adolf Schwarzenberg in 1598
Statue of Cardinal Friedrich Schwarzenberg Cardinal Friedrich Schwarzenberg
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg
Location of Palais Schwarzenberg
Prague
Prague (Czech Republic)
Located in the St. Vitus Cathedral in the Prague Castle

Memorial to Cardinal Friedrich Schwarzenberg
Schwarzenberg Monument in Meusdorf (Leipzig) Schwarzenberg Monument in Meusdorf
Location of Schwarzenberg Monument
Location of Schwarzenberg Monument
Meusdorf (Leipzig)
Meusdorf (Leipzig) (Germany)
Inaugurated in 1838

Commemorating the victory of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg at the Battle of the Nations in 1813

Commissioned by Karl Philipp's wife and his three sons
Schwarzenberg Memorial on the peak of Plattenkogel Mountain Schwarzenberg Memorial on the peak of Plattenkogel Mountain
Location of Schwarzenberg Memorial
Location of Schwarzenberg Memorial
Plattenkogel
Plattenkogel (Austria)
Commemorating the presence of Cardinal Friedrich Schwarzenberg
Walhalla Memorial

Bust of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg
Bust of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg

Second from the right in the lowest row
Location of the Walhalla Memorial
Location of the Walhalla Memorial
Donaustauf
Donaustauf (Germany)
Inaugurated in 1842

Commemorating the victory of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg at the Battle of the Nations in 1813

The original bust was created by Johann Nepomuk Schaller in 1821
Ruhmeshalle (Munich)

Bust of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg
Ruhmeshalle
Location of Munich
Location of Munich
Munich
Munich (Germany)
Inaugurated in 1853
Heldenberg Memorial

Bust of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg
Location of Heldenberg Memorial
Location of Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial (Austria)
Inaugurated in 1849

One of four Schwarzenberg busts in the Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial

Bust of Edmund Schwarzenberg
Edmund Schwarzenberg
Location of Heldenberg Memorial
Location of Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial (Austria)
Inaugurated in 1849

One of four Schwarzenberg busts in the Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial

Bust of Adolf Schwarzenberg
Adolf Schwarzenberg
Location of Heldenberg Memorial
Location of Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial (Austria)
Inaugurated in 1849

One of four Schwarzenberg busts in the Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial

Bust of Felix Schwarzenberg
Felix Schwarzenberg
Location of Heldenberg Memorial
Location of Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial
Heldenberg Memorial (Austria)
Inaugurated in 1849

One of four Schwarzenberg busts in the Heldenberg Memorial
Thorvaldsen Museum

Bust of Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg
Karl Philipp Schwarzenberg
Location of Thorvaldsen Museum
Location of Thorvaldsen Museum
Thorvaldsen Museum
Thorvaldsen Museum (Denmark)
Created by Bertel Thorvaldsen
Capuchin Church

Bust of Schwarzenberg Uhlans Memorial
Schwarzenberg Uhlans Memorial
Location of Capuchin Church
Location of Capuchin Church
Capuchin Church
Capuchin Church (Austria)
The same church is used as the Imperial Crypt of the Habsburg family

The Family[edit]

Heads of the family and title progression[edit]

Rangkronen-Fig. 38.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
Lords of Seinsheim
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Barons of Schwarzenberg
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Counts of Schwarzenberg
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Princes of Schwarzenberg
House of Schwarzenberg arms.gif
Princes of Schwarzenberg
Primogenutre
Schwarzenberg Sekundogenitur Orlik Branch Coat of Arms.jpg
Princes of Schwarzenberg
Secundogeniture
House of Schwarzenberg arms.gifSchwarzenberg Sekundogenitur Orlik Branch Coat of Arms.jpg
Princes of Schwarzenberg
Unified
Rangkronen-Fig. 38.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
Conrad
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Erkinger (VI./I.)
(1362–1437)
same as before
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Adolf
(1557–1599)
same as before
CoA Schwarzenberg Johann I. Adolph.jpg
Johann Adolf I.
(1641–1670)
same as before
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Joseph II.
(1789–1833)
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Karl I. Philipp
(1789-1820)
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Karl VII./I.
Adopted by Heinrich
1965 Takeover of the Primogeniture Estate
1979 Headship Primogeniture
1986 Headship Secundogenitiure
same as before
Rangkronen-Fig. 38.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
...
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Michael II.
(1437–1469)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Adam I. Franz
(1600–1641)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Ferdinand
(1683–1703)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Johann Adolf II.
(1833–1888)
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Karl II.
(1820-1858)
Rangkronen-Fig. 38.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
Apollonius d. Ä.
(died 1311)
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Michael III.
(1469–1499)
Rangkronen-Fig. 18.svg
Blason fam de Schwarzenberg 2.svg
Johann Adolf I.
(1641–1670)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Adam II. Franz
(1703–1732)
Duke of Krumlov from 1723
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Adolf Joseph
(1888–1914)
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Karl III.
(1858-1904)
Rangkronen-Fig. 38.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
...
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Erkinger II.
(1499–1510)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Joseph I. Adam
(1732–1782)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Johann II.
(1914–1938)
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Karl IV.
(1904-1913)
Rangkronen-Fig. 38.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
Hildebrand (IV.)
(died 1386)
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Wilhelm I.
(1510–1526)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Johann I.
(1782–1789)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Adolph
(1938-1950)
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Karl V.
(1913-1914)
Rangkronen-Fig. 38.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
Michael (I.)
Michael (I.)
(died 1399)
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Wilhelm II.
(1526–1557)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Joseph III.
Titular Head of the Family
(1950-1979)
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Karl VI.
(1914-1986)
Rangkronen-Fig. 38.svg
CoA Seinsheim Barony.svg
Erkinger (VI./I.)
(1362–1437)
Rangkronen-Fig. 27.svg
Armoiries de Schwarzenberg 1.svg
Adolf
(1557–1599)
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Prinz Heinrich
Acting Head of the Family
Adopted by Adolph
(1950-1965)
Crown of prince of the Holy Roman Empire.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Karl VII./I.
Adopted by Heinrich
1965 Takeover of the Primogeniture Estate
1979 Headship Primogeniture
1986 Headship Secundogenitiure

Dynasty[edit]

The names hereby presented are those of all the direct successors of the Prince John I of Schwarzenberg (1742–1789). They have been respectively divided into the two brenches of Krumlov and Orlik, including the contemporary generations. For the genealogy to be easier to consult, the male successors alone are listed, and they are accompanied with noteworthy information where necessary. In bold the names of the members of the eldest part of the family.

  • Jan I Nepomuk (1742–1789), 5th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 10th (3rd of his line) Duke of Krumlov
    • A1. Josef II Jan (1769–1833), 6th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 11th (4th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1789–1833), founder of the main branch of the family (that of Frauenberg-Krummau)
      • B1. Jan Adolf II (1799–1888), 7th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 12th (5th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1833–1888)
        • C1. Adolf Josef (1832–1914), 8th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 13th (6th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1888–1914)
          • D1. Jan II Nepomuk (1860–1938), 9th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 14th (7th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1914–1938)
            • E1. Adolph Jan (1890–1950), 10th Prince of Schwarzenberg, 15th (8th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1938–1950)
            • E2. Karl (1892–1919)
            • E3. Edmund Černov (1897–1932), Called "Black Sheep" as a consequence of the refusal of his surname
          • D2. Alois (1863–1937)
          • D3. Felix (1867–1946)
            • E1. Josef III (1900–1979), 11th Prince of Schwarzenberg (1950–1979), last member of the eldest side of the dynasty
            • E2. Heinrich (1903–1965), 16th (9th of his line) Duke of Krumlov (1950–1965) (adopted G1. Karel (VII/I))
          • D4. Georg (1867–1952)
          • D5. Karel (1871–1902)
        • C2. Cajus (1839–1841)
      • B2. Felix (1800–1852), Prime Minister of the Austrian Empire
      • B3. Friedrich (1809–1885), Archbishop of Prague
    • A2. Karel I Philipp (1771–1820), Prince of Schwarzenberg, founder and chief of the second line of the family (Orlík)
      • B1. Friedrich (1800–1870), Who renounced his right of majorat in favour of his brother
      • B2. Karel II (1802–1858), Prince of Schwarzenberg
        • C1. Karel III (1824–1904), Prince of Schwarzenberg
          • D1. Karel IV (1859–1913), Prince of Schwarzenberg
            • E1. Karl V (1886–1914), Prince of Schwarzenberg
              • F1. Karel VI (1911–1989), Prince of Schwarzenberg
                • G1. Karel (VII / I) Schwarzenberg (born 1937), 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg (from 1979), 17th (10th considering his original line) Duke of Krumlov (from 1965), Former Minister of the Foreign Affairs and candidate to the head of state for Czech Republic in 2013. He unified the two lines of the family.
                  • H1. Jan Nepomuk (born 1967)
                • G2. Friedrich (1940–2014)
                  • H1. Ferdinand (born 1989)
              • F2. Franz Friedrich Maria (1913–1992), Who strongly opposed Nazi rule in Bohemia.
                • G1. Johann (born 1957)
                  • H1. Alexander (born 1984)
            • E2. Ernst (1892–1979)
            • E3. Josef (1894–1894)
            • E4. Jan Nepomuk (1903–1978), Austrian Embassador
              • F1. Erkinger (born 1933)
                • G1. Jan (born 1963)
                • G2. Alexandr (born 1971)
                  • H1. Karl Philipp (born 2003)
          • D2. Friedrich (1862–1936)
      • B2. Leopold (1803–1873), Austrian Marshal

Family tree: secundogeniture[edit]

[2]
Princely Hat.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Schwarzenberg Secundogeniture
Orlik Branch
Princely Hat.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.pngCOA von Hohenfeld10.png
Insignia of Knights of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece.svg
Karl I. Philipp

Maria Anna Hohenfeld
Princely Hat.svg
Friedrich
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.pngWratislaw von Mitrowitz-Wappen.png
Insignia of Knights of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece.svg
Karl II

Josefina Marie Wratislaw
Edmund
Princely Hat.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.pngCoa House of Oettingen.svg
Insignia of Knights of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece.svg
Karl III

Wilhelmine Oettingen-Wallerstein
GabrieleAnna Maria

Ernst Waldstein
Anna Maria

Franz Anton Thun-Hohenstein
Gabriele

Franz Josef Silva-Tarouca
Princely Hat.svg
Wapen Kinsky klein.svgSchwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.pngCoa Austria-Hungary Family Grof Hoyos (1827).svg
Insignia of Knights of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece.svg
Karl IV

1.Marie Theresia Kinsky
2.Ida Hoyos
Ida

Johann Karl Lazansky - Bukowa
Maria

Ferdinand Trauttmansdorf
Princely Hat.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.pngCoA.Clam-Gallas.jpg
Karl V

Eleonore Clam-Gallas
Eleonore

Johann Friedrich Hartig
Johannes

Kathleen de Spoelberch
Ernst

1. Elisabeth Széchenyi
2. Mathilde Gerber
JosephMaria Wilhelmine
Princely Hat.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.pngBlason fam de Maison von und zu Fürstenberg 2.svg
Insignia of Knights of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece.svg
Karl VI

Antonie Fürstenberg
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Heinrich

Eleonore Stolberg-Stolberg
Franz

Amálie Lobkowicz
Erkinger

1. Elisabeth Constantinides
2. Claudia Brandis
Colienne

Maximilian Meran
Anna Maria

Adolf Bucher
Marie Eleonore

Leopold-Bill Bredow
Princely Hat.svg
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.png
Insignia of Knights of the Austrian Order of the Golden Fleece.svg
Karl

Therese Hardegg
Thomas PrinzhornFriedrich

Regula Schlegel
Anna Maria

Elmar Haxthausen
Ludmila

1. Carl Hess
2.James Truman Bidwell jr.
Isabela

Louis Harnier
Jan

Regina Hogan
JohannesAnna Gabriella

1.Philipp Waechter
2.Adam P. Dixon
Alexander

1.Annabel Dimitriadis
2.Elena Bonanno
Gaia

Loïc van Cutsem
Ida

Baudouin de Troostembergh
Schwarzenberg-Orlický-Erb.pngCoA Riario 2.svg
Johannes

1.Diana Orgovanyi-Hanstein
2.Francesca Riario Sforza
Anna Carolina

Peter Morgan
Karl Philipp Prinzhorn

Anna Eltz
MarieFerdinandAlexanderKarl PhilippAnna-GabriellaAnna Elisabetta

Titles[edit]

Titles of the members of the family[edit]

Styles of
Princes(ses) of Schwarzenberg
Blason Maison de Schwarzenberg.svg
Reference styleHis/Her Serene Highness
Spoken styleYour Serene Highness

The title of the head of the princely family is:

  • HSH The Prince of Schwarzenberg, Duke of Krumlov, Count of Sulz, Princely Landgrave of Klettgau
    • (German: S.D. der Fürst zu Schwarzenberg, Herzog von Krummau, Graf von Sulz, gefürsteter Landgraf im Klettgau)

The title of the wife of the head of the family would be:

  • HSH The Princess of Schwarzenberg, Duchess of Krumlov, Countess of Sulz, Princely Landgravine of Klettgau
    • (German: I.D. die Fürstin zu Schwarzenberg, Herzogin von Krummau, Gräfin von Sulz, gefürstete Landgräfin im Klettgau)

The title of the first born son and heir of the family is:

  • HSH The Hereditary Prince of Schwarzenberg, Duke of Krumlov, Count of Sulz, Landgrave of Klettgau
    • (German: S.D. der Erbprinz zu Schwarzenberg, Herzog von Krummau, Graf von Sulz, Landgraf im Kledage)

The title of the wife of the first born son and heir of the family would be:

  • HSH The Hereditary Princess of Schwarzenberg, Duchess of Krumlov, Countess of Sulz, Landgravine of Klettgau
    • (German: I.D. die Erbprinzessin zu Schwarzenberg, Herzogin von Krummau, Gräfin von Sulz, Landgräfin im Klettgau)

The title of all other female members of the family is:

  • HSH Princess Name of Schwarzenberg, Countess of Sulz, Landgravine of Klettgau
    • (German: I.D. Prinzessin Name zu Schwarzenberg, Gräfin von Sulz, Landgräfin im Klettgau)

The title of all other male members of the family is:

  • HSH Prince Name of Schwarzenberg, Count of Sulz, Landgrave of Klettgau
    • (German: S.D. Prinz Name zu Schwarzenberg, Graf von Sulz, Landgraf im Klettgau)

Although the family is entitled to use the von und zu, only the zu is applied. Moreover, all members of the family are allowed to use the title Fürst / Fürstin. However, this is not anymore practiced since the late 19th century and the cognates refer to themselves as Prinz / Prinzessin.


Titel Progression[edit]

Coat of arms[edit]

Family coat of arms[edit]

Coat of arms of the House of Schwarzenberg
Coat of arm of the Secundogeniture / Orlík branch
Versions
Above: A gallery of the different CoAs of the Schwarzenberg family and its different lines
ArmigerMembers of the House of Schwarzenberg (according to their line)
Adopted1429
CrestMultiple
BlazonEight vertical stripes in silver and blue: (starting with Solid white.svg at dexter and ending with 000080 Navy Blue Square.svg at sinister.
SupportersTwo golden lions rampant with crossed tails (only princely lines)
CompartmentNon or vegetal compartment (branches)
MottoNIL NISI RECTUM
OrdersHouse-member specific
BadgeCrow pecking the eyes from a beheaded Turk's head (only princely lines)
Earlier versions917 - 1429 Coat of arms of the House of Seinsheim
Useon currency of the Principality of Schwarzenberg; on official buildings; private residences of family members; documents; etc.

The ancestral arms of the Lords of Seinsheim consisted of six vertical stripes in silver and blue.[3] However, the Schwarzenberg family's original coat of arms has four silver and four blue vertical stripes. Moreover, it starts with silver on the heraldic right (mirror-inverted perspective).

The family became Freiherren (Barons) of Schwarzenberg in 1429, and a silver tower on a black hill was added to their coat of arms to represent the city Scheinfeld and Schwarzenberg Castle.[3]

In 1599, Adolf von Schwarzenberg became an Imperial Count, and was given by the emperor a quarter with a canting arms showing the head of a Turk being pecked by a raven. This was to commemorate Adolf's conquest on 19 March 1598 of the Turkish-held fortress and city Győr. The German name of the Hungarian town is Raab, which means raven.[4][5][6]

In 1670, the Schwarzenbergs were raised to princely status. However, only the marriage of Ferdinand, The 2nd Prince of Schwarzenberg (1652–1703) with Marie Anna Countess of Sulz (1653–1698), the daughter of Johann Ludwig II. Count of Sulz (1626–1687), led to the augmenting of their coat of arms, with quarters added for the domains of Sulz, Brandis (canting arms: a brand) and the Landgraviate of Klettgau.[4][7] Due to the absence of a male heir, Count Rudolf requested at the imperial court that the two families should be consolidated. This was granted, which meant for the Schwarzenberg family not only to assume all titles, rights and duties of the Counts of Sulz, but also to inherit all of Rudolf's properties.

The last augmentation of the family coat of arms was granted by the Austrian Emperor Franz II. / I. . He rewarded Field Marshal Karl I. Philipp Prince of Schwarzenberg with the right to bear the three-part arms of the Habsburg family with the addition of an upright standing sword. This unique distinction was granted to commemorate the field marshal's victory in the Battle of the Nations, where he was the Generalissimo of the Sixth Coalition.

The family motto is NIL NISI RECTUM.

Municipal coat of arms[edit]

Traces of the Schwarzenberg coat of arms can be found in various district and municipal coat of arms, which can be linked to the family:

Coat of arms of Germany.svg Germany[edit]

Coat of arms of the Czech Republic.svg Czech Republic[edit]

Coat of Arms of Switzerland (Pantone).svg Switzerland[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Schwarzenbergs". Retrieved 13 November 2016.
  2. ^ Gothaisches Genealogisches Handbuch Fürstliche Häuser 2018 GGH7
  3. ^ a b "European Heraldry :: House of Schwarzenberg". Retrieved 13 November 2016.
  4. ^ a b "The Schwarzenberg Coat-of-arms". Retrieved 13 November 2016.
  5. ^ Sugar, Peter F.; Hanák, Péter; Frank, Tibor, eds. (1990). A History of Hungary. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. p. 97.
  6. ^ Slater, Stephen (2013). The Illustrated Book of Heraldry: An International History of Heraldry and Its Contemporary Uses. Wigston, Leicestershire: Lorenz Books. pp. 234, 240–241. ISBN 978-0-7548-2659-0.
  7. ^ CRnet.cz. "Informační servis města Třeboně". Retrieved 13 November 2016.

External links[edit]