Howard J. Lamade Stadium

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Howard J. Lamade Stadium
Lamade Stadium (pronounced LAM-a-DEE, LAM-a-DAY, or LAH-mAHd)
Little League World Series and Lamade Stadium.JPG
Location South Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Capacity 40,000 (3,300 seated)
Field size Left Field: 225 ft (68.6 m)
Center Field: 225 ft (68.6 m)
Right Field: 225 ft (68.6 m)
Surface Kentucky Bluegrass
Scoreboard Daktronics BA-2026
Construction
Opened 1959, 58 years ago
Renovated 2006, 1992 (lights)
Expanded 1971
Tenants
Little League World Series

Howard J. Lamade Stadium (pronounced LAM-a-DEE, LAM-a-DAY, or LAH-mAHd) is a baseball stadium in South Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Each year, it hosts the Little League World Series, along with Little League Volunteer Stadium. Lamade Stadium was built in 1959 and holds 40,000 people, most of whom sit on the outfield berms. It is the largest non-Major League Baseball stadium. The field is ⅔ the size of a professional field, with 60-foot (18.3 m) basepaths, a 46-foot (14 m) mound, and after the change in 2006, outfield fences at 225 ft (68.6 m).

Renovations[edit]

Lights were added in 1992 to facilitate night game play in conjunction with expansion of the series to round robin play.[1]

The exterior of Lamade Stadium and the Complex.

In 2006, the fences were moved back 20 ft (6.1 m) to 225 ft (68.6 m) to all fields; the wall forms one-fourth of a true circle. This was done because home runs were becoming too common. Other renovations included the extension of the stadium roofs to the end of the grandstands and additional seating with backing were added in place of bleacher seating.

In August 2011, Lamade Stadium set an attendance record for the game between La Grange, Kentucky and Clinton County, Pennsylvania, with 41,848 people in the stands and on the hill. It was later broken on August 29, 2015 when Lewisberry, Pennsylvania defeated Pearland, Texas with 45,716 in attendance.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Little Leaguers are set to play under the lights". Moscow-Pullman Daily News. (Idaho-Washington). Associated Press. August 24, 1992. p. 1C. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°14′N 76°59′W / 41.23°N 76.98°W / 41.23; -76.98