Howard J. Rubenstein

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Howard J. Rubenstein
Howard Rubenstein David Shankbone 2010.jpg
Rubenstein at the 2010 Time 100 Gala
Occupation Lawyer
Known for Public relations
Website www.rubenstein.com/bio_hr.html

Howard J. Rubenstein is an American lawyer and public relations expert. He has been called "the dean of damage control" by Rudolph Giuliani.[1]

Rubenstein grew up in a Jewish-American household in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, on 74th St. near Bay Parkway with an older sister. His mother was a homemaker, and his father was a Jewish[2] crime reporter for the Herald Tribune.[3] He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania Phi Beta Kappa in 1953 with a degree in economics.[3] He then attended Harvard Law School, but dropped out partway through the first semester.[3]

He then began writing press releases for a Brooklyn nursing home, the Menorah Home and Hospital for the Aged and Infirm, after his father had introduced him to some officials at the home.[1][3][4] Initially he worked out of his parents' kitchen, but later moved out after his parents refused to answer the phone saying "Rubenstein Associates".

Business grew quickly; as Rubenstein later said, "I was the only Democratic press agent in Brooklyn, so the politicians started coming to me".[3] He enrolled in St. John's University Law School to take night classes, and graduated in 1959 first in his class.[1][3] He then took a job as an assistant counsel to the House Judiciary Committee, but quit after six months.[3]

He is the president and founder of Rubenstein Associates, which has been described as the most influential public relations organization in New York City.[4] The firm was founded in 1954. Rubenstein’s more notable clients include many of New York’s iconic organizations including: The New York Yankees,[5] News Corporation,[6] Columbia University,[4] New York Philharmonic,[6] Sarah – Duchess of York, Rupert Murdoch [7] and The Metropolitan Opera.[6]

He has been described as “a PR genius”, and as “Public Relations royalty”.[7][8]

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