Hu Qiheng

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Hu Qiheng
Born1934 (1934)
Beijing, China
AwardsInternet Hall of Fame (2013)

Hu Qiheng (born 1934) is a Chinese computer scientist. Hu was the vice president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences from 1987 to 1996 and led the National Computing and Networking Facility of China which connected China to the Internet in April 1994. Hu was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame in 2013 as a global connector.

Early life and education[edit]

Hu was born in 1934 in Beijing, China.[1] She graduated from the Moscow Institute of Chemical Machinery in 1963 with an associate's degree in healthcare.[2]

Career[edit]

Starting in the 1980s, Hu was the director of the Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences from 1983 to 1987. After being named secretary general of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1987, she became the academy's vice president in 1988 and held the position until 1996.[1] During her time as vice president, Hu was in charge of the National Computing and Networking Facility of China. Hu's project installed the first TCP/IP connected to the Internet in China on April 20, 1994.[3]

After her position of vice president at the Chinese Academy of Sciences ended in 1996, Hu established the China Internet Network Information Center in 1997 and co-founded the Internet Society of China in 2001. As president of the Internet Society of China, Hu advocated for Internet installment in the outskirts of China.[4] In 2004, Hu was named as a member of the Working Group on Internet Governance held by the United Nations.[5]

Awards and honors[edit]

Hu was inducted into the Internet Hall of Fame as a global connector in 2013.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Hu is married with two children.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sleeman, Elizabeth, ed. (2002). The International Who's Who of Women 2002 (3rd ed.). Europa Publications. p. 257. ISBN 1857431227.
  2. ^ "APNIC 28 Speakers". Asia-Pacific Network Information Centre. Retrieved 24 March 2018.
  3. ^ Burgess, Jean; Marwick, Alice; Poell, Thomas, eds. (2017). The SAGE Handbook of Social Media. SAGE. pp. 123–24. ISBN 1473995795. Retrieved 25 March 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Qiheng Hu". Internet Hall of Fame. Retrieved 25 March 2018.
  5. ^ "Hu Qiheng". China Internet Museum. Retrieved 25 March 2018.
  6. ^ Sleeman, Elizabeth, ed. (2003). The International Who's Who 2004 (67th ed.). Europa Publications. p. 763. ISBN 1857432177. Retrieved 25 March 2018.