Huandoy

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Huandoy
Tullparaju
Nevadohuandoy.jpg
Huandoy
Highest point
Elevation 6,360 m (20,870 ft) [1]
Prominence 1,645 m (5,397 ft) [1]
Listing Ultra
Coordinates 09°01′43″S 77°39′56″W / 9.02861°S 77.66556°W / -9.02861; -77.66556Coordinates: 09°01′43″S 77°39′56″W / 9.02861°S 77.66556°W / -9.02861; -77.66556[1]
Geography
Huandoy is located in Peru
Huandoy
Huandoy
Location in Peru
Location Yungay Province, Ancash, Peru
Parent range Cordillera Blanca, Andes
Climbing
First ascent 1932 by H. Bernard, E. Hein, H. Hoerlin and E. Schneider
Easiest route Southwest face

Huandoy[2][3][4] (probably from Quechua wantuy, to transfer, to transpose, to carry, to carry a heavy load)[5] or Tullparaju[6] (possibly from Quechua tullpa rustic cooking-fire, stove, rahu snow, ice, mountain with snow,[7][8]) is a mountain located inside Huascarán National Park in Ancash, Peru. It is the second-tallest peak of the Cordillera Blanca section of the Andes, after Huascarán. These two peaks are rather nearby, separated only by the Llanganuco glacial valley (which contains the Llanganuco Lakes) at 3,846 m asl.

It is a snow-capped mountain with four peaks arranged in the form of a fireplace, the tallest of which is 6,395 m. The four peaks are each over 6,000 m, and are:[6]

  • Huandoy (6,395 m)
  • Huandoy-West (6,356 m)
  • Huandoy-South (6,160 m)
  • Huandoy-East (6,000 m)

It was first climbed in 1932 by a German party.[9] The ascent from the Llankanuku Lakes was first climbed in 1976.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Peru: 22 Mountain Summits with Prominence of 1,500 meters or greater" Peaklist.org. Listed as "Nevados Hunadoy". Retrieved 2012-04-17.
  2. ^ Peru 1:100 000, Carhuás (19-h). IGN (Instituto Geográfico Nacional - Perú). 
  3. ^ Alpenvereinskarte 0/3a. Cordillera Blanca Nord (Peru). 1:100 000. Oesterreichischer Alpenverein. ISBN 3-928777-57-2. 
  4. ^ Biggar, John (2005). The Andes: A Guide for Climbers. Andes. p. 69. ISBN 9780953608720. 
  5. ^ babylon.com
  6. ^ a b Ricker, John (1977). Yuraq Janka: A Guide to the Peruvian Andes. The Mountaineers Books. pp. 78–80. ISBN 9781933056708. 
  7. ^ Vocabulario comparativo quechua ecuatoriano - quechua ancashino -- castellano - English Archived 2016-03-04 at the Wayback Machine. (pdf)
  8. ^ babylon.com
  9. ^ Lefebvre, Thierry L'invention occidentale de la haute montagne andine, M@ppemonde Vol. 19, p. 16 (2005)

External links[edit]