Huang Songyou

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This is a Chinese name; the family name is Huang.

Huang Songyou (Chinese: 黄松有; Pinyin: Huáng Sōngyǒu, born December 1957) was the Vice-President of the Supreme People's Court of the People's Republic of China.

Biography[edit]

Huang was born in Shantou, Guangdong in December 1957. He received his Bachelor of Laws degree from Southwest University of Political Science & Law in 1982.[1]

After graduation, Huang worked as a judge in Guangdong High People's Court. He was elected to be the President of Zhanjiang Intermediate People's Court in 1997.

Huang was appointed by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress as the Head of the Civil Law Tribunal of the Supreme People's Court and member of its Judicial Committee on June 28, 1999.[2] He was appointed by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress as the Vice President of the Supreme People's Court on December 28, 2002.[3]

On or about October 16, 2008, Huang was reportedly detained by Communist Party discipline officials in connection with a corruption scandal.[4] He was removed from the office of the Supreme Court vice presidency on October 28, 2008.[5]

In early 2010, he was sentenced to life imprisonment for receiving over 3.9 million RMB (about $570,000) in bribes while sitting as a Supreme People's Court judge, and for embezzling funds while serving as a judge in Guangdong.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Li Yingmin, "汕头走出一个中国大法官" (A Chinese Justice from Shantou), Tequ Qingnian Bao (Special District Youth Daily), December 9, 2003.
  2. ^ Appointments by the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, June 28, 1999.
  3. ^ Appointment by the Standing Committee of the NPC, December 28, 2002.
  4. ^ High court judge placed under party investigation, South China Morning Post, October 16, 2008
  5. ^ "National People's Congress Removed Huang Songyou from the Office" (in Chinese). Sina.com. 2008-10-28. Retrieved 2008-10-28. 
  6. ^ China jails senior judge for life over corruption, BBC News, January 19, 2010, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8467064.stm

External links[edit]