Hubertus von Amelunxen

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Hubertus von Amelunxen (born December 29, 1958, Bad Hindelang, Allgäu) is a philosopher, art historian, editor, curator, photography critic, and professor for philosophy of photography and cultural studies. Amelunxen has authored and published several books focusing on the history and theory of photography and has curated several international exhibitions. He currently serves as president and provost at the European Graduate School, based in Saas-Fee, Switzerland, and Valletta, Malta.[1]

Academic career[edit]

Hubertus von Amelunxen studied Roman languages, German Studies, and Art History in Marburg and Paris. In Paris he visited the lectures by Michel Foucault at the Collège de France and by Jacques Derrida at the École Normale Supérieure. He obtained his Ph.D. in Roman Studies at the University of Mannheim with the thesis Allegory and Photography. Research on French Literature.

Amelunxen started his academic career by lecturing in Basel on time and photography (1991). He became a Visiting Professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1991-1992), representing Victor Burgin. In 1995 he obtained a 5-year tenure at the Muthesius Hochschule for Art and Design in Kiel, where he founded the Center for Interdisciplinary Project Studies. Afterwards, in 2000, he taught at the University of Düsseldorf and at the Institute for Fine Arts in Antwerp. In 2001 he became founding director at the International School of New Media in Lübeck, a position he held until 2005. From 2005 to 2009 he served as rector of the École Européenne Supérieure de l'Image (ÉESI) in Angoulême/Poitiers, France.[2] From 2010 to 2013 he served as president of the Hochschule der Bildenden Künste in Braunschweig.

The European Graduate School (EGS)[edit]

Since 2002 Amelunxen has been a faculty member of the European Graduate School, a private graduate school based in Saas-Fee, Switzerland, and Valletta, Malta, which specializes in philosophy, critical thinking and art therapy.

In 2006 he obtained the Walter Benjamin Chair at the EGS, specialized in Media Philosophy and Cultural Studies.

Since 2013 Amelunxen has served as president and provost at the European Graduate School.[3] Under his term, the EGS has expanded to Malta and its programs have gained full European accreditation.

Curatorial work[edit]

Besides his academic endeavours, Amelunxen has been also active as curator and member of artistic organisations. From 2001 until 2007 Amelunxen was Senior Curator at the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA) in Montréal, which is the world's largest center for architecture. During this time, he was responsible for the acquisition of an important group of works by Gordon Matta-Clark for the CCA. These works were reviewed by the Gordon Matta-Clark Archive and deposited within the CCA for 25 years.

In 2003 Amelunxen was appointed member of the Fine Arts Section of the Akademie der Künste in Berlin.[4] In 2014 he was appointed member of the first Artistic Advisory Board at the Public Art Experience,[5] in Luxembourg.

Amelunxen has curated several international exhibitions, working shoulder to shoulder with well-known artists such as Cy Twombly, Iannis Xenakis, Dieter Appelt, Peter Weibel, Naoya Hatakeyama, among others. His exhibitions have been shown in different galleries and museums of North America and Europe.

Editorial work[edit]

Along his academich path, Amelunxen has been active as an editor. He first became member of the editorial board of the Mannheim series of papers Mana-Analytika (Média Medusa) in 1987, a position he occupied until 1992.

In 1988 he became editor of the well-known German magazine oh history of photography "Fotogeschichte", which is published in Marburg and Frankfurt am Main.

Since 1996, he is a member of the German editorial board of the French series of papers "Esthétique", Editions l’Harmattan, a publication based in Paris.

Books[edit]

  • Gustave Le Gray, Seascapes, Schirmer/Mosel, Munich (2015); contains an essay by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[6]
  • Steve Sabella, Works 1997-2014, Hatje Cantz, Ostfildern (2014); edited by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[7]
  • Gordon Matta-Clark, Moment to Moment: Space, Verlag für Moderne Kunst, Nürnberg; co-edited with Angela Lammert and Philip Ursprung (2012).[8]
  • Elger Esser, Nocturnes à Giverny. Claude Monet's Garden, Schirmer/Mosel Verlag, Munich (2012); with an essay by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[9]
  • Iannis Xenakis, Kontrolle und Zufall, Akademie der Künste, Berlin (2011); co-edited with Angela Lammert.[10]
  • Cy Twombly, Photographs III. 1951-2010 (2011); with an essay by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[11]
  • Photography and Disaster. Collected Essays, University of Disaster Series, Atropos Press, New York/Dresden (2010).
  • Paul Virilio, Grey Ecology, University of Disaster Series, Atropos Press, New York/Dresden (2009); edited by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[12]
  • Notation. Kalkül und Form in den Künsten, Akademie der Künste, Berlin (2008); co-edited with Dieter Appelt and Peter Weibel.[13]
  • Naoya Hatakeyama, Scales, Nazraeli Press, Portland (2007); with an essay by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[14]
  • Petra Wittmar, Medebach, Steidl & SK Stiftung Kultur, Cologne (2007); with an essay by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[15]
  • Victor Burgin, Voyage to Italy, HatjeCantz, Stuttgart (2006); co-edited with Thomas Zander.[16]
  • Dieter Appelt, Forth Bridge. Cinema. Metric Space, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montréal (2005).[17]
  • Alain Paiement, Tangent e, Lars Müller Publishers & Canadian Centre for Architecture, Zürich/Montréal (2003).[18]
  • Jean-Philippe Reverdot, "Bilan provisoire. Photographies 1983-1999", Marval, Paris (2001).[19]
  • Gegenwartsbildung / Present Formations, Schriftenreihe der Muthesius-Hochschule "Gestalt und Diskurs", vol. 2, Kiel (2001); co-edited with Antje Krause-Wahl.[20]
  • Photo- und Konzeptkunst am Bau. Unter den Linden 50. Ein Projekt für den Deutschen Bundestag Berlin, AWF Verlag, Heidelberg (2000); co-edited with Hans-Werner Schmidt.[21]
  • Architecture of Zaha Hadid in Photographs by Hélène Binet, Lars Müller Publishers, Baden (2000); with an essay by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[22]
  • Theorie der Fotografie i-IV. 1980-1995, Schirmer/Mosel, Munich (2000); co-edited with Wolfgang Kemp.[23]
  • Tomorrow For Ever. Architektur/Zeit/Photographie, DuMont, Cologne (1999); co-edited with Carl Aigner and Walter Smerling.[24]
  • Andreas Müller-Pohle, Interfaces. Foto + Video. 1977–1999, European Photography, Göttingen (1999); edited by Hubertus von Amelunxen.[25]
  • Artfiction. Junge Kunst aus Italien, Kiel Stadtgalerie im Kulturviertel/Sophienhof Kiel, Kiel (1998); co-edited with Knut Nievers and Edoardo DiMauro.[26]
  • Photography after Photography. Memory and Representation in the Digital Age, G+B Arts, New York (1997); co-edited with Stefan Iglhaut and Florian Rötzer.[27]
  • Les lieux du non-lieu. L'état des choses dans la photographie française contemporaine, Verlag der Kunst, Dresden (1997); co-edited with Ulrich Pohlmann.[28]
  • Fotografie nach der Fotografie, Verlag der Kunst, Berlin (1995); co-edited with Stefan Iglhaut and Florian Rötzer.[29]
  • Allegorie und Photographie. Untersuchungen zur französischen Literatur des 19. Jahrhunderts, University of Mannheim (1992); doctoral dissertation.[30]
  • Zhang Hai'er, Fotografien aus China. 1986-1989, Edition Braus, Heidelberg (1990); co-edited with Barbara Kunzendorf-Hohenadl.[31]
  • Television/Revolution. Das Ultimatum des Bildes. Rumänien im Dezember 1989, Jonas, Marburg (1990); co-edited with Andrei Ujica.[32]
  • Die aufgehobene Zeit. Die Erfindung der Photographie durch William Henry Fox Talbot, Nishen, Berlin (1988).[33][34]

Exhibitions[edit]

Academic initiatives[edit]

  • Cinéma, Interactivité, Société / Cinema, Interactivity, Society. First Biennale Figures of Interactivity, Poitiers, France (2008).[54]
  • Workshop Vitra, Domaine de Boisbuchet; together with Richard McGuire (2008).
  • Co-responsible for the international congress config.art for Documenta 10, Kassel (1997).[55]

Personal life[edit]

Hubertus von Amelunxen married Christine Marx in 1990; they divorced in 2012. They have two sons. Amelunxen lives and works between Berlin, Switzerland and Malta.

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hubertus von Amelunxen Faculty profile at European Graduate School.
  2. ^ Press release by the École Européenne Supérieure de l'Image.
  3. ^ Hubertus von Amelunxen Faculty profile at European Graduate School.
  4. ^ Profile of Hubertus von Amelunxen at the Akademie der Künste.
  5. ^ Fonds Belval project.
  6. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783829607278.
  7. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783775737678.
  8. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783869841380.
  9. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783829605786.
  10. ^ Book's page on Amazon Germany. ISBN 978-3883311753.
  11. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783829605373.
  12. ^ Book's page on Amazon. ISBN 978-0982706732.
  13. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783883311234.
  14. ^ Book's page on AbeBooks. ISBN 9781590052167.
  15. ^ Book's page on Amazon. ISBN 978-3865212801.
  16. ^ Book's page on the publishing house. ISBN 978-3-7757-1886-8.
  17. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783037780480.
  18. ^ Book's page on AbeBooks. ISBN 978-3037780107.
  19. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9782862343334.
  20. ^ Series' record on the site of the Veröffentlichungen der Muthesius Kunsthochschule; updated: February 2013. ISBN 978-3-00-006328-2.
  21. ^ Book's record on the cataloge arthistoricum. ISBN 978-3-00-006328-2.
  22. ^ Book's page on Amazon. ISBN 978-3907078129.
  23. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783829602396.
  24. ^ Book's record on AbeBooks. ISBN 9783770150687.
  25. ^ Book's record on ZVAB; retrieved February 10, 2017. ISBN 3-923283-51-2.
  26. ^ Book's page on WorldCat. ISBN 9783927979499.
  27. ^ Book's page on Amazon. ISBN 978-9057011016.
  28. ^ Book's record on Columbia College Chicago's Library. ISBN 9057050625.
  29. ^ Book's page on Amazon. ISBN 978-3364003610.
  30. ^ Dissertation's record on MOBIUS, in Missouri. OCLC: crle46175932.
  31. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783925835933.
  32. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783894451004.
  33. ^ Book's review on Der Spiegel, March 7, 1988.
  34. ^ Book's record on WorldCat. ISBN 9783889400123.
  35. ^ Cy Twombly exhibition at BOZAR-PMSK (The Palace of Fine Arts)'s site.
  36. ^ Exhibition's site at the Akademie der Künste in Berlin.
  37. ^ Exhibition's site at the Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe.
  38. ^ Exhibition's press release from the Villa Oppenheim, Berlin.
  39. ^ Exhibition's press release from the Villa Oppenheim, Berlin.
  40. ^ Exhibition's press release from the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), Montréal.
  41. ^ Event's program at the site from the Ecole Européenne Supérieure de l’Image.
  42. ^ Exhibition's site at the Akademie der Künste, Berlin.
  43. ^ Exhibition's press release from the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), Montréal.
  44. ^ Exhibition's press release from the Neues Kunstforum, Cologne.
  45. ^ Exhibition's press release from the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), Montréal.
  46. ^ Exhibition's site at the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA), Montréal.
  47. ^ Dialogue between Hubertus von Amelunxen and Alain Paiement on the exhibition at the magazine Ciel Variable.
  48. ^ Exhibition's site at the site of basis wien, Vienna.
  49. ^ Exhibition's review by Matthias Groll in Kulturforum (1999), vol. 146, p. 364.
  50. ^ Artist's CV at VOX — Centre de l'image contemporaine, Canada.
  51. ^ Reference: Hans Belting, Bild-Anthropologie, Fink, Munich (2001), p.61 (p.45 on this anthology).
  52. ^ Exhibition's site at the Fotomuseum Winterthur, Switzerland.
  53. ^ Exhibition's review at Die Zeit, April 21, 1989.
  54. ^ Colloquium's abstract and program, published on the site of the Centre Interuniversitaire des Artes Médiatiques.
  55. ^ Article 'Medien: Theorie und Geschichte', published on Publik. Kasseler Hochschulzeitung (1997), page 5, January 21.