Hudajužna

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Hudajužna
1915 postcard of Hudajužna
1915 postcard of Hudajužna
Hudajužna is located in Slovenia
Hudajužna
Hudajužna
Location in Slovenia
Coordinates: 46°10′37.89″N 13°55′7.5″E / 46.1771917°N 13.918750°E / 46.1771917; 13.918750Coordinates: 46°10′37.89″N 13°55′7.5″E / 46.1771917°N 13.918750°E / 46.1771917; 13.918750
Country Flag of Slovenia.svg Slovenia
Traditional region Slovenian Littoral
Statistical region Gorizia
Municipality Tolmin
Area
 • Total 3.14 km2 (1.21 sq mi)
Elevation 391.2 m (1,283.5 ft)
Population (2002)
 • Total 119
[1]

Hudajužna (pronounced [xudaˈjuːʒna]; Italian: Villa Iùsina[2]) is a village in the valley of the Bača River in the Municipality of Tolmin in the Littoral region of Slovenia.[3] The Bohinj Railway line runs through the settlement.

Name[edit]

The settlement was first attested in 1515 as Pochudauschna (and as Chuda Jusna in 1566, Cudaiusna in 1591, and per Hudeiusine in 1628). The name is a fused compound derived from *Huda južina (< hud 'intense, strong' + južina 'southern weather'), and thus refers to a local area that experienced the first significant thaw. The cadastral survey carried out under Emperor Francis I indicates that the name first referred to a rock shelter on Obloke Hill (Slovene: Obloški hrib) above the village, known as the place where the snow first melts away in spring.[4][5] The adjective hud also means 'bad' and the noun južina 'lunch', and so popular imagination has created a story about how the name refers to an Ottoman attack on the village while the villagers were having lunch.[4][6]

Notable people[edit]

Notable people that were born or lived in Hudajužna include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia
  2. ^ Venézia Giúlia e Dalmázia. 1934. Milan: Touring club italiano, p. 295.
  3. ^ Tolmin municipal site
  4. ^ a b Torkar, Silvo. 2003. "K nastanku in pomenu nekaterih zemljepisnih imen v Baški dolini / On the Origin and Meaning of Several Toponyms in the Bača Valley." Slavistična revija 51(4): 429–442.
  5. ^ Snoj, Marko. 2009. Etimološki slovar slovenskih zemljepisnih imen. Ljubljana: Modrijan and Založba ZRC, p. 165.
  6. ^ a b c Savnik, Roman, ed. 1968. Krajevni leksikon Slovenije, vol. 1. Ljubljana: Državna založba Slovenije, p. 404.

External links[edit]