Hugh I, Count of Maine

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Hugh I was count of Maine (900–933). He succeeded his father as of Count of Maine c. 900.

Life[edit]

He was the son of Roger, Count of Maine, and Rothilde, daughter of Charles the Bald.[1] He succeeded his father c. 900.[2] By a marriage of his sister of unknown name[a] to Hugh the Great sometime before 917 Hugh became an ally to the Robertians ending a long period of hostility between them.[3] Around 922, King Charles the Simple withdrew the benefit of the Abbey of Chelles from Rotilde, Hughʻs mother and Hugh the Greatʻs mother-in-law, to entrust it to a favorite of his, Hagano.[4] The favoritism shown Hagano caused a great deal of resentment and led, in part, to a revolt against Charles the Simple that placed Robert I of France on the throne.[5] Even after the death of his sister when Hugh the Great married a second time he remained an adherent of the Robertians.

Family[edit]

By his unnamed wife, very probably a Rorgonide,[6] he had:


Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Europäische Stammtafeln Band II, Tafel 10 has the first wife of Hugh the Great as Judith.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pierre Riché, The Carolingians; A Family who Forged Europe, Trans. Michael Idomir Allen (University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 1993), p. 237
  2. ^ K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, 'Two Studies in North French Prosopography', Journal of Medieval History, Vol. 20 (1994), p. 10
  3. ^ Richard E. Barton, Lordship in the County of Maine, c. 890-1160 (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 2004). p. 83
  4. ^ The Annals of Flodoard of Reims; 919-966, Ed. & Trans. Steven Fanning & Bernard S. Bachrach (University of Toronto Press, 2011), p. 6
  5. ^ Jim Bradbury, The Capetians: Kings of France, 987-1328 (Continuum, London & New York, 2007), p. 34
  6. ^ a b K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Family Trees and the Root of Politics; A Prosopography of Britain and France from the Tenth to the Twelfth Century (The Boydell Press, Woodbridge, 1997) p. 194