Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Award

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Recipients[edit]

1980[edit]

The judges were Tom Bradley, Mayor of Los Angeles; Jules Feiffer, playwright and social cartoonist; Fay Kanin, President, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; Victor Navasky, Editor, The Nation; and Tom Wicker, Columnist and Associate Editor, The New York TImes.

1981[edit]

The judges were Edward Brooke, US Senator, Massachusetts; Nat Hentoff, author and columnist, The Village Voice; Fay Kanin, President, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; Judith Krug, Director, The American Library Association; and Charles Nesson, Dean, Harvard Law School.

1982[edit]

The judges were Yvonne Braithwaite Burke, Partner, Kutak, Rode & Huie; Hamilton Fish III, Publisher, The Nation; Florence McMullin, Chair, The Washington Library Association Intellectual Freedom Committee; and Aryeh Neier, Professor of Law, New York University.

1983[edit]

The judges were Harriet Pilpel, Attorney, Weil, Gotshal & Manges; Studs Terkel, author and nationally syndicated radio show host; and William Worthy, international journalist and civil liberties activist.

1984[edit]

The judges were Martin Agronsky, Agronsky and Company; Alan Dershowitz, Professor, Harvard Law School; and Liza Pike, Program Director, Center for Investigative Reporting.

1985[edit]

The judges were Burton Joseph, Attorney, Barsy, Joseph & Lichtenstein; Harriet Pilpel, Attorney, Weil, Gotshal & Manges; and Melody Sands, former owner of The Athens News.

1986-1987[edit]

The judges were Julius Chambers, President, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund; Maxwell Lillienstein, General Counsel, American Booksellers Association; and Anthony Podesta, Founding President, People for the American Way.

1988[edit]

The judges were Charlayne Hunter-Gault, New York Correspondent, The MacNeil / Lehrer NewsHour; Anthony Lewis, syndicated columnist, The New York Times; Steven Pico, First Amendment lecturer and advocate; and Tom Wicker, political columnist, The New York Times.

1989[edit]

The judges were Judith Krug, Director, the American Library Association for Intellectual Freedom; Jack K. Landau, attorney an columnist, Newhouse Newspapers; Clarence Page, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Columnist, Chicago Tribune; and Harriet Pilpel, attorney, Weil, Gotshal & Manges.

1990[edit]

The judges were Herbert N. Foerstel, Head of Branch Libraries, University of Maryland; Robert Scheer, National Correspondent, Los Angeles Times; and Maxine Waters, US Representative, California.

1991[edit]

The judges were Arthur Kropp, President, People for the American Way; Barry Lynn, Co-host, Battleline news radio talk show; Eve Pell, investigative journalist, Freedom of Information Project; and Tom Wicker, political columnist, The New York Times.

1992[edit]

The judges were Dennis Barrie, Executive Director, Contemporary Arts Center of Cincinnati; Norman Dorsen, Stokes Professor of Law, New York University Law School; Mark Goodman, Executive Director, Student Press Law Center; Barbara Kopple, documentary filmmaker; and Reginald Stuart, Assistant News Editor, Knight-Ridder Newspapers.

1993-1994[edit]

The judges were Rex Armstrong, Attorney and Volunteer Counsel, ACLU of Oregon; Jessica Mitford, author and social activist; and Carl Jensen, Founder, Project Censored.

1995-1996[edit]

The judges were Chris Finan, Executive Director, The Media Coalition; Marjorie Heins, Director an Staff Counsel, ACLU Arts Censorship Project; and Sydney Schanberg, journalist.

1997[edit]

The judges were Anthony Griffin, attorney; Bobby Handman, President, People for the American Way; and Burton Joseph, Attorney, Barsy, Joseph & Lichtenstein.

1998[edit]

The judges were Nadine Strossen, President, ACLU; Peter S. Prichard, President, Freedom Forum; and Ann K. Symons, President, American Library Association.

1999[edit]

The judges were Mark Goodman, Executive Director, Student Press Law Center; Molly Ivins, author and columnist, Creators Syndicate; Barbara Kopple, filmmaker; and Clarence Page, columnist, Chicago Tribune.

2000-2001[edit]

The judges were Floyd Abrams, Partner, Cahill Gordon & Reindel; Lucy Dalglish; Executive Director, Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press; Robert M. O'Neil, Director, Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression; and Nadine Strossen, President, ACLU.

2002-2003[edit]

The judges were Margaret Carlson, CNN's The Capital Gang and Time Magazine columnist; Ann Richards, former Governor of Texas; and John Seigenthaler, Founder, First Amendment Center.

2006[edit]

The judges were Katrina vanden Heuvel, Editor and Publisher, The Nation; Anthony D. Romero, Executive Director, American Civil Liberties Union; and Eugenie Scott, Executive Director, National Center for Science Education.

2008[edit]

The judges were Nadine Strossen, President, American Civil Liberties Union and Professor of Law, New York Law School; Geoffrey Stone, Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor at University of Chicago Law School; and David Rubin, Professor and Former Dean, S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University.

2012[edit]

The judges were Hector Villagra; Patricia Schroeder; Robert Scheer; and Norman Lear.

2013[edit]

The judges were Henry Weinstein from the University of California, Ramona Ripston and Dr. Charles C. Haynes, Director of the Religious Freedom Education Project.

2014[edit]

The judges were Margaret Carlson, Laura W. Murphy Director if the ACLU's Washington Legislative Office, and Joan E. Bertin Executive Director of National Coalition Against Censorship.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Lodge, Elayne (May 29, 2013). "Ahlquist receives 1st Amendment Award". Cranston Herald. Retrieved June 3, 2013. 
  2. ^ Business Wire (May 15, 2013). "Winners Announced for 2013 Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Awards". The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company, Inc. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Winners and Judges of the Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Awards". Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Awards. HMH Foundation. 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Marjorie Heins wins 2013 Hugh Hefner First Amendment Award!". From the Square. NYU Press. May 15, 2013. Retrieved February 27, 2013. 

External links[edit]