Hugh Seymour, 8th Marquess of Hertford

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Hugh Edward Conway Seymour, 8th Marquess of Hertford (29 March 1930 – 22 December 1997) was the son of Brig.-Gen. Lord Henry Charles Seymour and the grandson of both Hugh Seymour, 6th Marquess of Hertford and Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster.

Educated at Eton College.

He inherited the title of Marquess of Hertford in 1940 after his uncle, the 7th Marquess, died without a direct heir.

Hugh Seymour married Pamela Therese Louise de Riquet, Comtesse de Caraman-Chimay (daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel Prince Alphonse de Chimay and Mary Brenda Hamilton), on 10 July 1956.[1] They had four children:

His sister Lady Margaret Hay served as Lady-in-Waiting to HRH Princess Elizabeth from 1947–52, and then as a Woman of the Bedchamber to The Queen from 1953-75.[2]

Lord Hertford notably saved his family home, Ragley Hall, Warwickshire, from demolition after he inherited it in 1940.[3] In 1958 he was one of the first peers to open his country house to the paying public.[3] He also commissioned artist Graham Rust to paint an epic mural and ceiling painting over the grand staircase. Work started in 1969 and finished in 1983. The finished mural portrayed a view of the Mountain of Temptation on the ceiling and several of Lord Hertford's relatives and godparents to his children behind the trompe-l'œil balustrade of the trompe-l'œil landing.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Hugh Edward Conway Seymour, 8th Marquess of Hertford". ThePeerage.com. p. 2164. 
  2. ^ Yvonne's Royalty Home Page: Queen Elizabeth II's Coronation Attendants
  3. ^ a b "8th Marquess of Hertford Saved Ragley Hall House and Gardens". Warwickshire Life. 7 February 2010. Retrieved 23 August 2014. 
  4. ^ Montgomery-Massingberd, Hugh (1994), Great Houses of England & Wales, London: Laurence King Publishing, pp. 235–237, ISBN 1-85669-053-9 

External links[edit]

Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
George Seymour
Marquess of Hertford
1940–1997
Succeeded by
Henry Seymour