Hugh White (American football)

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Hugh White
Hugh White.jpg
White cropped from 1901 Michigan football team photograph
Michigan Wolverines
Position Tackle, end
Career history
College
Bowl games 1902 Rose Bowl
Personal information
Date of birth (1876-11-07)November 7, 1876
Place of birth Lapeer, Michigan
Date of death June 11, 1936(1936-06-11) (aged 59)
Place of death Scarsdale, New York
Height 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight 180 lb (82 kg)

Hugh White (November 7, 1876 – June 11, 1936) was an American football player. He played for the University of Michigan from 1898 to 1901, and captained the national championship-winning 1901 team.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

White was born in Lapeer, Michigan in 1876, the son of Henry Kirke White and Jane Wigglesworth White. His father had run away from home as a boy, crewed on a whaling ship, participated in the California Gold Rush, and fought in the American Civil War. White received a Ph.B in 1899 and an LL.B. in 1902 from the University of Michigan.[1]

College football career[edit]

White played left tackle for the Michigan during the 1898 season,[2] left end in the 1899 season,[3] and returned to left tackle in the 1900[4] and 1901 seasons.[5] As a senior, he captained the 1901 Michigan Wolverines football team, the first of Fielding H. Yost's famous "Point-a-Minute" teams, which went undefeated with an 11–0 record, outscored their opponents 550–0, and defeated Stanford in the inaugural Rose Bowl, 49–0. In the Rose Bowl, Michigan put the ball in play 142 times for 1,463 offensive yards.[6][7][8] Stanford coach Charles Fickert, asked Michigan coach Yost to stop the game, since his team was no match for Michigan, but Yost insisted the game continue. Yost had been ousted as Stanford's coach the year before.[9] With eight minutes left in the game, White agreed with Stanford captain, R. S. Fisher, to stop play.[6]

Later life[edit]

In the fall of 1902, White became the football coach at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.[10] He married Abbie E. Cutting of Lapeer, Michigan in 1903. They were the parents of three daughters, Elizabeth, Martha, and Marion.[1] In 1904, White umpired Ivy League football games.[11] He later worked as an engineer and became president (1924–1927) and Chairman of the Board (1927–1933) of the George A. Fuller Company, one of the largest construction companies in the United States, which erected major public buildings such as the Lincoln Memorial (1918), the United States Supreme Court Building (1933), and major office buildings.[12] White served as Village President of Scarsdale, New York. He died of pneumonia on June 11, 1936 after a brief illness.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Hugh White dies; noted engineer, 59". The New York Times. 1936-06-12. p. 23. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  2. ^ "1898 Football Team". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan Athletics History. The Regents of the University of Michigan. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  3. ^ "1899 Football Team". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan Athletics History. The Regents of the University of Michigan. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  4. ^ "1900 Football Team". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan Athletics History. The Regents of the University of Michigan. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  5. ^ "1901 Football Team". Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan Athletics History. The Regents of the University of Michigan. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  6. ^ a b Nelson, David M. (1994). The Anatomy of a Game: Football, the Rules, and the Men who Made the Game. University of Delaware Press. p. 87. ISBN 0-87413-455-2. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  7. ^ UPI wire service (1966-07-13). "Rose Bowl Feat". Lodi News-Sentinel. p. 16. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  8. ^ Kuechle, Oliver E. (1971-12-05). "Rose Bowl Coming Full Circle". The Milwaukee Journal. p. 3. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  9. ^ O'Sullivan, Dan (2002-12-13). "1902 - Michigan 49, Stanford 0". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Group. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  10. ^ Phi Delta Theta Fraternity (1903). The Scroll of Phi Delta Theta, Volume 27. p. 103. Retrieved 2008-06-11. 
  11. ^ "FIRST OF SEASON'S FOOTBALL SURPRISES; Columbia and Princeton of the So-Called Big Teams Beaten". The New York Times. 1904-10-16. p. 19. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  12. ^ Chiel, Chris; Julie Decker (2005). Quonset Hut: Metal Living For The Modern Age. Princeton Architectural Press. p. 1. ISBN 1-56898-519-3. Retrieved 2008-10-24.