Hugo Award for Best Fancast

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Hugo Award for Best Fancast
Awarded forThe best non-professional science fiction or fantasy video or audio series published in the prior calendar year
Presented byWorld Science Fiction Society
First awarded2012
Most recent winnerDitch Diggers (Mur Lafferty and Matt Wallace)
Websitethehugoawards.org
Emma and Peter Newman accepting the 2017 Hugo Award for Best Fancast

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was previously officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award.[1] It has been described by The Guardian and Litro Magazine as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".[2][3]

The Hugo Award for Best Fancast is awarded to the best non-professional audio or video periodical devoted to science fiction, fantasy, or related subjects. The fancast must have released four or more episodes by the end of the previous calendar year, at least one of which appeared in that year, and it must not qualify for the dramatic presentation category. It must also not provide or be published by an entity that provides a quarter or more of the income of any one person working on the fancast.[4] The name of the award is a portmanteau of fan and podcast. The Hugo Award for Best Fancast was first proposed as a category after the 2011 awards, and then appeared as a temporary category at the 2012 awards. Temporary awards are not required to be repeated in following years. The 2013 awards, however, did repeat the category, and afterwards it was ratified as a permanent category, and will appear in all future years.

Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, and the awards presentation constitutes its central event. Supporting members are those who do not attend the convention itself, and pay a smaller membership fee as a result. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The fancasts on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of fancasts that can be nominated. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held.[5] Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations.[6] Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year.[1][7] Members are permitted to vote "no award", if they feel that none of the nominees is deserving of the award that year, and in the case that "no award" takes the majority the Hugo is not given in that category. This happened in the Best Fancast category in 2016.[8]

During the 7 years the award has been active, 20 fancasts by 58 people have been nominated, and 5 of those fancasts have won. SF Squeecast, created by a team of five people, won the award in both 2012 and 2013, and declined to be nominated for 2014.[9] SF Signal Podcast, run by Patrick Hester, won the 2014 award, and Galactic Suburbia Podcast, run by Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts, and Andrew Finch, won the 2015 award. No award was given in 2016, and Tea and Jeopardy, by Emma Newman and Peter Newman, won in 2017 on its third nomination. Ditch Diggers, by Mur Lafferty and Matt Wallace, won the 2018 award in its second year of nominations. Galactic Suburbia Podcast has received the most nominations at six, followed by The Coode Street Podcast at five.

Winners and nominees[edit]

In the following table, the years correspond to the date of the ceremony, rather than when the story was first published. Entries with a blue background have won the award; those with a white background are the other nominated works.

  *   Winners

Year Fancast Editor(s) Ref.
2012 SF Squeecast* Lynne M. Thomas, Seanan McGuire, Paul Cornell, Elizabeth Bear, and Catherynne M. Valente [10]
The Coode Street Podcast Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe [10]
Galactic Suburbia Podcast Alisa Krasnostein, Alex Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts, Andrew Finch [10]
SF Signal Podcast John DeNardo, JP Frantz, and Patrick Hester [10]
StarShipSofa Tony C. Smith [10]
2013 SF Squeecast* Elizabeth Bear, Paul Cornell, Seanan McGuire, Lynne M. Thomas, Catherynne M. Valente, and David McHone-Chase [11]
The Coode Street Podcast Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe [11]
Galactic Suburbia Podcast Alisa Krasnostein, Alex Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts, Andrew Finch [11]
SF Signal Podcast John DeNardo, JP Frantz, and Patrick Hester [11]
StarShipSofa Tony C. Smith [11]
2014 SF Signal Podcast* Patrick Hester [12]
The Coode Street Podcast Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe [12]
Galactic Suburbia Podcast Alisa Krasnostein, Alex Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts, Andrew Finch [12]
The Skiffy and Fanty Show Shaun Duke, Jen Zink, Julia Rios, Paul Weimer, David Annandale, Mike Underwood, and Stina Leicht [12]
Tea and Jeopardy Emma Newman [12]
Verity! Deborah Stanish, Erika Ensign, Katrina Griffiths, L. M. Myles, Lynne M. Thomas, and Tansy Rayner Roberts [12]
The Writer and the Critic Kirstyn McDermott and Ian Mond [12]
2015 Galactic Suburbia Podcast* Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts, and Andrew Finch [13]
Adventures in SF Publishing Brent Bower, Kristi Charish, Timothy C. Ward, and Moses Siregar III [13]
Dungeon Crawlers Radio Daniel Swenson, Travis Alexander, Scott Tomlin, Dale Newton, and Damien Swenson [13]
The Sci Phi Show Jason Rennie [13]
Tea and Jeopardy Emma Newman and Peter Newman [13]
2016 (no award)+ [8]
8-4 Play Mark MacDonald, John Ricciardi, Hiroko Minamoto, and Justin Epperson [8]
Cane and Rinse Cane, Rinse [8]
HelloGreedo HelloGreedo [8]
The Rageaholic RazörFist [8]
Tales to Terrify Stephen Kilpatrick, Scott Silk, and Philip Oldham [8]
2017 Tea and Jeopardy* Emma Newman and Peter Newman [14]
The Coode Street Podcast Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe [14]
Ditch Diggers Mur Lafferty and Matt Wallace [14]
Fangirl Happy Hour Ana Grilo and Renay Williams [14]
Galactic Suburbia Podcast Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts, and Andrew Finch [14]
The Rageaholic RazörFist [14]
2018 Ditch Diggers* Mur Lafferty and Matt Wallace [15]
The Coode Street Podcast Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe [15]
Fangirl Happy Hour Ana Grilo and Renay Williams [15]
Galactic Suburbia Podcast Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce, Tansy Rayner Roberts, and Andrew Finch [15]
Sword and Laser Veronica Belmont and Tom Merritt [15]
Verity! Deborah Stanish, Erika Ensign, Katrina Griffiths, L. M. Myles, Lynne M. Thomas, and Tansy Rayner Roberts [15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The Locus index to SF Awards: About the Hugo Awards". Locus. Archived from the original on 2010-01-03. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  2. ^ Jordison, Sam (2008-08-07). "An International Contest We Can Win". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2009-07-29. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  3. ^ Cleaver, Emily (2010-04-20). "Hugo Awards Announced". Litro Magazine. Archived from the original on 2011-05-07. Retrieved 2010-04-21.
  4. ^ "Hugo Award Categories". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2014-10-06. Retrieved 2014-12-11.
  5. ^ "The Hugo Awards: Introduction". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2014-10-06. Retrieved 2010-04-20.
  6. ^ "Worldcon 75: 2017 Hugo report #2" (PDF). Worldcon 75. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-08-15. Retrieved 2017-08-15.
  7. ^ "World Science Fiction Society / Worldcon". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2009-04-14. Retrieved 2010-04-20.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g "2016 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2017-08-11. Retrieved 2016-04-27.
  9. ^ Gallo, Irene; Engle-Laird, Carl; Bourke, Liz; Landon, Justin (2014-04-22). "Rocket Talk, Episode 5: The Hugo Awards". Rocket Talk. Tor.com. Retrieved 2014-04-26.
  10. ^ a b c d e "2012 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2012-04-09. Retrieved 2012-04-09.
  11. ^ a b c d e "2013 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2015-09-06. Retrieved 2013-04-03.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g "2014 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2015-09-06. Retrieved 2014-04-20.
  13. ^ a b c d e "2015 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2015-09-05. Retrieved 2015-09-06.
  14. ^ a b c d e f "2017 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Archived from the original on 2017-08-11. Retrieved 2017-08-11.
  15. ^ a b c d e f "2018 Hugo Awards". World Science Fiction Society. Retrieved 2018-04-02.

External links[edit]