Hull Minster

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Hull Minster
Holy Trinity Church (former)
006-SFEC-HULL-20070329-HOLYTRINITY.JPG
Hull Minster
CountryUnited Kingdom
DenominationChurch of England
ChurchmanshipLow Church
WebsiteHullMinster.org
Administration
DioceseDiocese of York
ProvinceProvince of York
Clergy
Vicar(s)Rev Canon Dr Neal Barnes
Laity
Organist/Director of musicMr Mark Keith
The altar
The font

Hull Minster is an Anglican minster in the centre of Kingston upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, England. The church was called Holy Trinity Church until 13 May 2017 when it became Hull Minster.

History[edit]

It is the largest parish church in England by floor area.[1] The church dates back to about 1300[1] and contains what is widely acknowledged to be some of the finest mediaeval brick-work in the country, particularly in the transepts. The Minster Church is now a Grade I listed building.[2]

The Minster Church is a member of the Greater Churches Group.

William Wilberforce, who led the parliamentary campaign against the slave trade, was baptised in Holy Trinity Church.[3]

In November 2014 plans were unveiled to reorder the church, creating an outstanding venue for performances, exhibitions and banquets, a visitor destination, and a place where those in need of help can find assistance. The aim is to create a place for the whole community, and a venue that will be a driving force in the regeneration of Hull's Old Town. The transformation, costing a total of £4.5 million, will take place in phases from 2016 onwards, the first being ready for UK City of Culture in 2017.[4]

On 7 November 2016, Archbishop of York John Sentamu announced that the church would be given Minster status in a ceremony on 13 May 2017.[5] Sentamu came to Hull on 13 May in a flotilla of boats with a lantern lit at All Saint's Church, Hessle to rededicate the church as Hull Minster.[6]

List of vicars[edit]

  • 1326 Robert de Marton
  • 1345 Peter de Aslaksby
  • Peter de Walton
  • 1349 Thomas de Baynbriggs
  • 1349 Robert de Thornton
  • 1362 John de Hurtheworth
  • 1364 Richard Lestebury
  • John Stayngreve
  • 1391 Richard Marke
  • 1400 John de Barton
  • 1416 Thomas de Esyngwald
  • 1420 Thomas Bywell
  • 1433 Thomas de Bewyk
  • 1444 Thomas Delyngton
  • 1455 John Harewode
  • 1467 William Meryngton
  • 1468 John Yolton
  • 1492 Robert Hedlam
  • 1503 James Cokerell
  • 1519 George Dent
  • 1522 Thomas Logan
  • 1538 William Peres
  • 1557 Thomas Fugall
  • 1561 Melchior Smyth
  • 1591 Theophilus Smyth
  • 1615 Richard Perrott
  • 1642 William Styles
  • 1689 Robert Banks
  • 1715 John Wilkinson
  • 1715 Charles Mace
  • 1721 William Mason
  • 1753 Arthur Robinson
  • 1783 Thomas Clarke
  • 1797 Joseph Milner
  • 1797 John Healey Bromby
  • 1867 Richard England Brooke
  • 1875 Joseph M'Cormick
  • 1894 John William Mills
  • 1895 Joshua Hughes-Games
  • 1904 Arthur Blackwell Goulburn Lillingston
  • 1914 Louis George Buchanan
  • 1924 Cecil Francis Ayerst
  • 1927 William Seldon Morgan
  • 1937 Frederick Boreham
  • 1947 Leslie Oldfield Kenyon
  • 1956 Reginald Iliff
  • 1967 Gerald Bernard Bridgman
  • 1988 John Watson Waller
  • 2002 James Oliphant Forrester
  • 2010 Dr Neal Duncan Barnes

Organ[edit]

The organ is a large four manual instrument. The oldest parts of the organ date from 1622 by the builder John Raper. There was further work in 1756 and 1758 by John Snetzler and 1788 by Ryley. Forster and Andrews worked on the organ in 1845, 1854, 1876, 1900 and 1908, with John Compton providing the last restoration in 1938.

A specification of the organ can be found on the National Pipe Organ Register

Organists[edit]

  • Mr. Baker ???? – 1715
  • George Smith 1715–1717
  • Musgrave Heighington 1717–1720 (later organist of St Nicholas Church, Great Yarmouth)
  • William Avison 1720–1751
  • Matthias Hawdon 1751–1769 (later organist of Beverley Minster)
  • John Hudson 1768–1787
  • Thomas Hawdon 1787–1789
  • George Lambert 1789–1838 [7]
  • George James Skelton 1838–1851[8] – 1868
  • Thomas Craddock 1868–1875
  • G.E. Jackman 1875–1881
  • Fred K. Bentley 1881[9] – 1921[10] – 1929
  • Norman Ewart Strafford 1929–1951[11]
  • Peter Goodman 1951–1961[12] (previously organist of Guildford Cathedral)
  • Ronald Arthur Styles 1961–1977
  • Desmond Swinburn 1977–1986
  • Julian Savory 1986–1991
  • John Pemberton 1991
  • Alan Dance, 1991–1999
  • Roland Dee 1999–2004
  • Paul Derrett and Serena Derrett 2005 – 2007
  • Serena Derrett – Director of Music 2007 – 2015 (now known as Jerome Robertson)
  • Mark Keith – Organist 2007 –

Organ Scholars

  • David Thomas since September 2011
  • Richard Harrison Cowley since May 2017

Gallery for New Building 2018[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Holy Trinity Church, Hull". Holy Trinity Church. Archived from the original on 14 December 2007. Retrieved 12 June 2007.
  2. ^ Historic England. "Parish Church Of The Holy Trinity And Churchyard Wall (1292280)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  3. ^ "History of the Church". Hull Minster. Archived from the original on 13 November 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Hull's Holy Trinity Church plans for UK City of Culture 2017". BBC News. BBC. 7 November 2014. Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  5. ^ "Hull's Holy Trinity Church to become Minster on 13 May". BBC News. BBC. 7 November 2016. Retrieved 9 November 2016.
  6. ^ "Hull Minster: Holy Trinity Church re-dedicated". BBC News. BBC. 13 May 2017. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  7. ^ Curious Epitaphs By William Andrews. READ BOOKS, 2008 ISBN 1-4086-8017-3
  8. ^ General Directory of Kingston-upon-Hull, and York, 1851, p.197
  9. ^ Dictionary of Organs and Organists. First Edition. 1912.
  10. ^ Dictionary of Organs and Organists. Second Edition. 1921. G. A. Mate (London)
  11. ^ Who's Who in Music. Shaw Publishing Co. Ltd. London. First Post-War Edition. 1949–50
  12. ^ The Succession of Organists of the Chapel Royal and Cathedrals of England and Wales. Watkins Shaw.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 53°44′29″N 0°20′00″W / 53.74139°N 0.33333°W / 53.74139; -0.33333