Hull School of Art

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The Hull School of Art was founded in 1861.[1] During its history it changed name and shape before being absorbed into the now University of Lincoln.[2]

History[edit]

Originally, classes were given in a suite of upstairs chambers at the Public Assembly Rooms, now the New Theatre. In 1878 the School of Art had moved to a Georgian town house on Albion Street. In 1901 an Anlaby Road site was acquired from the North Eastern Railway Company, and an architectural competition advertised. The winning design for a new Hull School of Art was produced by the Bloomsbury firm of Lanchester, Stewart and Rickards; the building was completed in April 1905.

In 1930 the school at Anlaby Road became Hull College of Arts and Crafts. In 1962 the College was renamed the Regional College of Art and Design, and began to offer a syllabus leading to the newly recognised Diploma in Art and Design (DipAD). In 1972 a new Art College Building on Queens Gardens was commissioned, designed by the Architectural Partnership of Frederick Gibberd. This building received its first students in September 1974, and offered honours degrees in Fine Art and Graphic Design.

The amalgamation of the local authority's Higher Education provision commenced in 1976 with the foundation of Hull College of Higher Education. It was later renamed to the University of Humberside and entered into alliance with higher education institutions in Lincoln. The resulting University of Lincolnshire and Humberside came into being in 1996, and underwent a further name change in 2001 when it became the University of Lincoln.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Welcome to the Hull School of Art & Design". Hull School of Art & Design. Retrieved 8 August 2009. 
  2. ^ David Foster (1997). "Unity out of diversity: the origins and development of the University of Humberside". Continuum International Publishing Group: vii. ISBN 978-0-485-11513-0. Retrieved 28 May 2009.