Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Deceased Fathers) Act 2003

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The Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Deceased Fathers) Act 2003[1]
Long title An Act to make provision about the circumstances in which, and the extent to which, a man is to be treated in law as the father of a child where the child has resulted from certain fertility treatment undertaken after the man’s death; and for connected purposes.
Citation 2003 c 24
Territorial extent England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, except that any amendment by the Schedule of an enactment has the same extent as the enactment amended.[2]
Dates
Royal assent 18 September 2003
Commencement 1 December 2003,[3] except that section 4 came into force on 18 September 2003.[4]
Status: Amended
Text of statute as originally enacted
Revised text of statute as amended

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Deceased Fathers) Act 2003 (c 24) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The Act amended the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 to allow, among other things, a man to be listed in birth certificates as the father of a child even if the child was conceived after the death of the man. It is thought to affect around five to ten families a year.[5]

Section 2[edit]

Sections 2(2) and (3) were repealed by section 30 of, and the Schedule to, the Legislative and Regulatory Reform Act 2006.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The citation of this Act by this short title is authorised by section 4(1) of this Act.
  2. ^ The Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Deceased Fathers) Act 2003, sections 4(4) and (5)
  3. ^ The Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Deceased Fathers) Act 2003, section 4(2); the Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Deceased Fathers) Act 2003 (Commencement) Order 2003, article 2
  4. ^ The Interpretation Act 1978, section 4(b)
  5. ^ "Diane Blood registers sons". BBC News Online. 1 December 2003. 

External links[edit]