Humberto Robinson

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Humberto Robinson
Relief pitcher
Born: (1930-06-25)June 25, 1930
Colón, Panama
Died: September 29, 2009(2009-09-29) (aged 79)
Brooklyn, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 20, 1955, for the Milwaukee Braves
Last MLB appearance
July 24, 1960, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 8–13
Earned run average 3.25
Strikeouts 114
Teams

Humberto Valentino Robinson (June 25, 1930 – September 29, 2009) was a middle relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1955 through 1960 for the Milwaukee Braves (1955, 1958), Cleveland Indians (1959) and Philadelphia Phillies (1959–60). Listed at 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 155 lb (70 kg), Robinson batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Colón, Panama.

Robinson made history by becoming the first Panamanian-born player to appear in a Major League game, when he debuted with the Braves on April 20, 1955. His efforts would enable future generations of fellow countrymen to follow him, including Juan Berenguer, Rod Carew, Roberto Kelly, Carlos Lee, Héctor López, Ben Oglivie, Adolfo Phillips, Mariano Rivera, Manny Sanguillén and Rennie Stennett, between others.

In an eight-season career, Robinson posted an 8–13 record with a 3.25 ERA and four saves in 102 appearances, including seven starts and two complete games, giving up 77 earned runs on 189 hits and 90 walks while striking out 114 in 213.0 innings of work.

In 10 minor league seasons, Robinson compiled a record of 122–84 with a 3.05 ERA for nine different teams (1951–57, 1960–62). He also was a main force in the pitching staff of Panamanian teams during the first stage of the Caribbean Series.

Robinson died in Brooklyn, New York at the age of 79, due to complications from Alzheimer's disease.

Fact[edit]

  • Before debuting in the majors, Robinson set a South Atlantic League record with 23 wins in 1954. He is also notable for reporting a US$1500 offer to throw a game in 1959.[1]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Moffi, Larry; Kronstadt, Jonathan. Crossing the Line. McFarland & Company. p. 140. Retrieved August 28, 2008. 

External links[edit]