Hurricane Newton (2016)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Hurricane Newton
Category 1 hurricane (SSHWS/NWS)
Newton 2016-09-06 1825Z.jpg
Hurricane Newton over the Baja California Peninsula on September 6
Formed September 4, 2016
Dissipated September 8, 2016
(Remnant low after September 7)
Highest winds 1-minute sustained: 90 mph (150 km/h)
Lowest pressure 977 mbar (hPa); 28.85 inHg
Fatalities 9 confirmed, 3 missing
Damage $96 million (2016 USD)
Areas affected Baja California Peninsula, Northwestern Mexico, Southwestern United States
Part of the 2016 Pacific hurricane season

Hurricane Newton was the first hurricane to make landfall on the Baja California Peninsula since Hurricane Odile in September 2014. The fifteenth named storm and the ninth hurricane of the 2016 Pacific hurricane season, Newton formed as a tropical depression out of an area of low pressure off of the coast of Mexico on September 4. Despite only moderately favorable conditions, the storm quickly intensified while moving north and became a hurricane roughly a day after being designated. Attaining peak intensity early on September 6, Newton then proceeded to make landfall on the Baja California Peninsula shortly afterwards. It quickly weakened and degenerated into a remnant low on September 7, before dissipating the next day.

Ahead of the storm, several preparations were made to avoid a calamity similar to what Odile had caused two years prior. The hurricane was responsible for at least nine deaths, mainly attributed to flooding; and US$96 million in damages.

Meteorological history[edit]

Map plotting the track and intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

On August 27, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) first mentioned the potential for an area of low pressure to develop south of Mexico as an area for tropical cyclogenesis.[1] An area of disturbed weather formed on August 31 offshore western Guatemala,[2] which developed into a low-level trough the next day.[3] Favorable environmental conditions allowed the system to organize and develop a distinct low pressure area on September 2, which produced a widespread area of disorganized thunderstorms.[4] A circulation began organizing within the system,[5] leading to the NHC classifying it as Tropical Depression Fifteen-E late on September 4, while about 220 mi (355 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Colima.[6]

With warm waters, moderate wind shear, and adequate moisture, the system continued to organize after formation,[6] strengthening to Tropical Storm Newton by early on September 5. The storm moved northwestward, steered by a ridge that over Texas.[7] Late on September 5, an eye was visible on satellite imagery, and the Hurricane Hunters observed flight-level winds of 85 mph (137 km/h); based on these observations, the NHC upgraded Newton to hurricane status.[8] With continued low wind shear and warm waters, Newton intensified further to a peak intensity of 90 mph (150 km/h) early on September 6.[9] That day, the large wind field and 52 mi (83 km) eye failed to organize more, and the hurricane made landfall near Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur, near peak intensity.[10]

Rounding the western periphery of the ridge, Newton turned northward and weakened over the Baja California Peninsula. The eyewall deteriorated and fell apart while the convection waned.[11] On September 7, Newton made a second landfall on mainland Mexico near Bahía Kino, Sonora, and weakened to tropical storm status. The storm curved to the northeast ahead of a broad trough,[12] with increasing wind shear exposing the center from the waning convection.[13] At 21:00 UTC on September 7, the NHC discontinued advisories on Newton, assessing that the storm degenerated into a post-tropical cyclone before crossing into southern Arizona.[14] The residual circulation continued northeastward,[15] dissipating by early on September 8.[16]

Preparations[edit]

Upon the formation of Newton, the government of Mexico issued a hurricane watch for the western side of Baja California Sur. Upon being named, the hurricane watch was upgraded into a hurricane warning, while a tropical storm warning was briefly issued for Cabo Corrientes. By the afternoon of September 5, tropical storm warnings and watches were issued for much of Sonora and Sinaloa.[citation needed]

During the afternoon of September 5, authorities issued a "yellow" alert in southern Jalisco,[17] "green" alert for the state of Baja California Sur,[18] Sinaloa, northern and central Jalisco, Nayarit, Colima, and Michoacan. A blue alert was declared in Guerrero and Baja California.[17] Classes were suspended in Colima,[19] in three municipalities in northern Jalisco,[20] in Baja California Sur,[21] and in Mazaltan.[22] A total of 800 military personnel was deployed, and a plan to designate all tourists in the Baja California Peninsula.[23] A total of 56 shelters were opened across the peninsula,[24] with a net capacity of 16,000; however, only 1,500 used these shelters.[25]

Impact[edit]

Newton nearing Baja California as a strong tropical storm on September 5

The outer rainbands of Hurricane Newton brought heavy rains to Guerrero and Chiapas that resulted in flooding.[26] Across Chiapas, three people were killed[27] and two others were reported missing. In the capital city of Tuxtla, almost 900 homes were damaged and six were demolished, leaving 3,500 displaced.[28] In Guerrero, a total of 695 homes were flooded and 12 communities were isolated. Due to the flooding, officials evacuated about 150 people in seven shelters. In Petatlan, two people were swept away in a river, one of whom was found alive.[29] Seventy homes were damaged and 200 people were trapped in the resort town of Acapulco, prompting air evacuations via police, marines and the army.[30] Further north, severe flooding was reported in Colima and Jalisco. Two rivers overflowed, resulting in several communities being isolated.[31] The communities of El Sentinel and El Rebalse were the worst affected by the storm. Several people sought shelter in schools and other public spaces.[32] Statewide, 20 families were evacuated because of flooding.[33]

While damage near the landfall location was minor, the hurricane's heavy rains deluged the municipality of Mulege. There, power and drinking water access was lost. In the municipality's seat of Santa Rosalia, dozens of houses and vehicles were buried in rocks and debris. Nearby, the communities of San Ignacio and Herocina Mulege were cut off from the outside world due to damage to the Mexican Federal Highway 1.[34] Offshore, in the Gulf of California, a shrimp boat capsized due to rough seas, resulting in five people being swept away.[35] Two dead bodies were later found ashore while the other three were briefly missing.[36] before being reported dead on September 8.[37] Damage across Baja California Sur reached 700 million pesos (US$37.3 million).[38] Guaymas Municipality suffered extensive impacts from the hurricane, with more than 3,000 homes damaged. Total losses in the municipality reached 1.1 billion pesos (US$58.7 million).[39]

The remnants of Newton brought heavy rainfall to the southwestern United States, peaking at 5.67 in (144 mm) at Miller Carr Canyon in southeastern Arizona. Precipitation reached 3.43 in (87 mm) near Texico, New Mexico, the highest in that state.[16]

Aftermath[edit]

Due to the flooding in Guerrero, 817 troops, 25 radio stations, 24 first aid kits, and 124 automobiles were displaced for cleanup.[29] Following Hurricane Odile in 2014, where extensive post-storm looting was reported, officials guarded numerous shops in the southern portion of the Peninsula to prevent such looting. However, police noted that five people were arrested for trying to loot two convenience stores in Los Cabos.[40]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eric Blake (August 27, 2016). Tropical Weather Outlook (TXT) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  2. ^ Eric Blake (August 31, 2016). Tropical Weather Outlook (TXT) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  3. ^ Eric Blake (September 1, 2016). Tropical Weather Outlook (TXT) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  4. ^ Eric Blake (September 2, 2016). Tropical Weather Outlook (TXT) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  5. ^ Robbie Berg (September 3, 2016). Tropical Weather Outlook (TXT) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b John Cangialosi (September 4, 2016). Tropical Depression Fifteen-E Discussion Number 1 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  7. ^ Robbie Berg (September 5, 2016). Tropical Storm Newton Discussion Number 2 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  8. ^ Eric Blake (September 5, 2016). Hurricane Newton Discussion Number 5 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  9. ^ Daniel Brown (September 6, 2016). Hurricane Newton Discussion Number 6 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  10. ^ Stacy Stewart (September 6, 2016). Hurricane Newton Discussion Number 7 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  11. ^ Todd Kimberlain (September 6, 2016). Hurricane Newton Discussion Number 8 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  12. ^ Richard Pasch (September 7, 2016). Tropical Storm Newton Discussion Number 11 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  13. ^ Robbie Berg (September 7, 2016). Tropical Storm Newton Discussion Number 12 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  14. ^ Robbie Berg (September 7, 2016). Tropical Storm Newton Discussion Number 13 (Report). National Hurricane Center. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  15. ^ Allison Santorelli (September 7, 2016). Post-Tropical Cyclone Newton Advisory Number 14 (Report). Weather Prediction Center. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  16. ^ a b Allison Santorelli (September 8, 2016). Post-Tropical Cyclone Newton Advisory Number 15 (Report). Weather Prediction Center. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  17. ^ a b "Emiten alerta en ocho estados por tormenta "Newton"". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  18. ^ "Decretan alerta verde en BCS por tormenta "Newton"". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  19. ^ "Colima mantiene suspensión de clases por "Newton"". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  20. ^ "Suspenden clases en 3 municipios de Jalisco por tormenta "Newton"". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  21. ^ "BCS suspende clases por huracán "Newton"". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  22. ^ "Suspenden clases en Mazatlán por huracán Newton". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Activan planes DN3 y Marina en BCS por "Newton"". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  24. ^ "Hermine lingers offshore; Newton approaches Mexico". Vindatrator News. Associated Press. September 6, 2016. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  25. ^ "Hurricane Newton slams into Mexico's Los Cabos". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. September 6, 2016. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  26. ^ "El huracán Newton toca tierra en la costa oeste de México Ese fuerte viento que sopla". Montevideo. September 6, 2016. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  27. ^ "Hurricane Newton roars across Mexico resort". Digital Journal. Associated Press. September 6, 2016. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  28. ^ Alessandro Masoero (September 6, 2016). "Mexico – Deadly Floods in Chiapas and Guerrero, Hurricane Newton Approaches West Coast". Floodlist. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  29. ^ a b "Aumenta a mil 895 viviendas afectadas por lluvias en Guerrero". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  30. ^ "Storm Newton strengthens to hurricane off Mexico's Pacific coast". ABC News. September 6, 2016. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 
  31. ^ "Tormenta ocasiona inundaciones y daños en carreteras de Colima". El Financiero. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  32. ^ "Tormenta deja inundaciones y daños en carreteras de Colima". Colima Noticas. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  33. ^ "Suspenden clases en 3 estados por huracán "Newton"". El Universal. September 5, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016. 
  34. ^ "Torrential rains cause damage in Mulegé". Mexican News Daily. September 9, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016. 
  35. ^ Andrew V. Pestano and Doug G. Ware (September 7, 2016). "Newton responsible for at least 5 deaths; storm pushes rains into U.S. Southwest". United Press International. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  36. ^ "2 dead, 3 missing as Hurricane Newton batters northwest Mexico". AOL. September 6, 2016. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  37. ^ "Storm death toll climbs to five in Mexico". Zee News. September 8, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016. 
  38. ^ "'Newton' dejó daños por 700 mdp en BCS" (in Spanish). SDP Noticias. October 11, 2016. Retrieved October 28, 2016. 
  39. ^ Raul Enrique Rodriguez Angulo (September 14, 2016). "Estiman mil cien millones de pesos en daños por Newton" (in Spanish). MegaNoticias. Retrieved October 28, 2016. 
  40. ^ "Hurricane Newton roars across Mexico resort". Channel NewsAsia. September 6, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 

External links[edit]