City of Hurstville

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Hurstville City Council
New South Wales
Hurstville lga sydney.png
Location in Metropolitan Sydney, 1931–2016
Coordinates33°58′S 151°06′E / 33.967°S 151.100°E / -33.967; 151.100Coordinates: 33°58′S 151°06′E / 33.967°S 151.100°E / -33.967; 151.100
Population80,823 (2011 census)[1]
 • Density3,510/km2 (9,100/sq mi)
Established25 March 1887
Abolished12 May 2016
Area23 km2 (8.9 sq mi)
Council seatCivic Centre, Hurstville
RegionSt George
ParishSt. George
Hurstville City Council Logo.png
WebsiteHurstville City Council
LGAs around Hurstville City Council:
Bankstown Canterbury Bexley/Rockdale
Bankstown Hurstville City Council Rockdale
Sutherland Sutherland Kogarah

The Hurstville City Council was a local government area in the St George and southern region of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The city seat of Hurstville is located 17 kilometres (11 mi) south–west of Sydney and west of Botany Bay. Hurstville was incorporated as a municipality in 1887, declared a city in 1988, and abolished in 2016, forming with Kogarah City Council the new Georges River Council.

Council history[edit]

On 25 March 1887 the NSW Government Gazette published a proclamation declaring the "Municipal District of Hurstville".[2] On 29 December 1887, the Municipality was divided into three wards: Bexley Ward, Hurstville Ward and Peakhurst Ward.[3] On 28 June 1900, a further proclamation declared the separation of Bexley Ward as the Borough of Bexley.[4]

A proclamation on the same day reconstituted Hurstville, divided into two wards: Hurstville and Peakhurst.[5] On 10 September 1908, Hurstville was divided into four wards: Hurstville Ward, Woodville Ward, Peakhurst Ward and Penshurst Ward.[6] On 2 August 1922, a part of Hurstville was transferred to the Sutherland Shire; on 5 December 1924 part of Canterbury Municipality was transferred to Hurstville; and on 1 January 1931 part of Hurstville was transferred to Kogarah Municipality.[4] On 3 July 1968 Woodville Ward was abolished, with the council divided into three wards: Hurstville, Peakhurst and Penshurst.[7]

In December 1920, Hurstville combined with the councils of Rockdale, Kogarah, and Bexley to form the St George County Council. The elected County Council was established to provide electricity to the Kogarah, Rockdale, Hurstville, and Bexley areas and ceased to exist when it was amalgamated with the Sydney County Council on 1 January 1980.[8][9] On 25 November 1988 the Municipality of Hurstville was proclaimed as the "City of Hurstville".[10]

Council seats[edit]

In 1889 Hurstville Council purchased a property on the corner of Forest Road, Hurstville, for £1750, as the first Council Chambers until 1913.[11][12] However, its small size meant that within a few decades, Council sought options for a new purpose-built Council Chambers further up on a site fronting McMahon Street on the corner with Dora Street occupied by the fire station. By November 1913 the old fire station was remodelled into new Council Chambers by architect (and former Mayor of Kogarah) Charles Herbert Halstead.[13][14][15]

On 31 July 1930 Council approved a proposal for new chambers on the site of the 1913 chambers.[16] The foundation stone, placed next to the re-laid foundation stone from the demolished 1913 chambers, was laid by Mayor Hill on 6 December 1930.[17] The new Chambers, designed in the Inter-War Georgian Revival style by architects Herbert & Wilson (Leonard Federick Herbert and Edward Douglas Wilson), was officially opened on 16 May 1931 by the Minister for Local Government, William McKell.[18][19][20]

A new 'Civic Centre' concept with the provision of a performance hall, for a site on McMahon Street north of Dora Street was first proposed Mayor Olds on 17 July 1947, and was the subject of continuing debate throughout the 1950s.[21] The project was finally approved by Council in June 1954.[22][23] Designed in the Post-War International Style by architects Peddle Thorp & Walker and built by James S. Samson & Co. of Parramatta, the new Civic Centre included an auditorium which seated 1264 people (named Marana Hall in 1964, meaning 'place of stars') and a smaller hall (named Amaroo Hall in 1964, meaning 'lovely place'). Completed at a cost of £320,000, the Civic Centre was officially opened on 2 June 1962 by the Governor of New South Wales, Sir Eric Woodward.[24][25]

The 1982 extension of the Hurstville Civic Centre on MacMahon Street, Hurstville, is now the seat of Georges River Council.

After the completion of the Civic Centre in 1962, the former Council Chambers further down on McMahon Street was tenanted by the Bank of New South Wales from 1963 to 1965 and the St George Police-Citizens Boys' Club from 1966 to 1969, before being demolished in January 1974 for the 'Hurstville House' office/retail development. The foundation stones from the old Council Chambers were incorporated into façade of 1962 Civic Centre.[26]

In January 1977, Hurstville Council acquired the former 'Rivoli Hall' on the other corner of Dora Street and McMahon Street, which was soon demolished to make way for a Brutalist style extension to the Civic Centre that would incorporate a new central library designed by the Council Architect.[27] The extension and library, completed at a cost of approximately $4.3 million, was officially opened on 30 July 1982 by the Premier of New South Wales, Neville Wran.[28]

Amalgamation proposals[edit]

Efforts to bring about a unified council for the St George area were raised regularly since 1901 and the 1946 Clancy Royal Commission into local government boundaries recommended the amalgamation of the municipalities of Hurstville, Kogarah, Rockdale and Bexley. In the following act of parliament passed in December 1948, the Local Government (Areas) Act 1948, the recommendations of the commission were modified, leading only to the merger of Bexley and Rockdale councils. A merger was again considered in the 1970s, but 1977 plebiscites run in Hurstville and Kogarah rejected the idea. A further idea of amalgamating Kogarah and Hurstville with Sutherland Shire to the south was raised in 1999 but did not progress.[29]

A 2015 review of local government boundaries by the NSW Government Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal recommended that Hurstville merge with the City of Kogarah to form a new council with an area of 38 square kilometres (15 sq mi) and support a population of approximately 147,000.[30] On 12 May 2016 the NSW Government announced that Hurstville and Kogarah would merge to form the Georges River Council, with immediate effect.[31]

Suburbs and localities in the former local government area[edit]

Suburbs in the Hurstville City Council area were:

The following unofficial localities were also located within Hurstville:

  • Boggywell Creek
  • Edith Bay
  • Gertrude Point
  • Gungah Bay
  • Hurstville Bay
  • Jew Fish Bay
  • Jew Fish Point
  • Kingsway
  • Lime Kiln Bay
  • Lime Kiln Head
  • Oatley West
  • Soilybottom Point

Demographics[edit]

At the 2011 Census, there were 78,855 people in the Hurstville local government area, of these 48.5% were male and 51.5% were female. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people made up 0.6% of the population. The median age of people in the City was 37 years. Children aged 0 – 14 years made up 17.7% of the population and people aged 65 years and over made up 15.4% of the population. Of people in the area aged 15 years and over, 53.4% were married and 9.2% were either divorced or separated.[1]

Population growth in Hurstville City Council between the 2001 Census and the 2006 Census was 5.31%; and in the subsequent five years to the 2011 Census, population growth was 6.96%. When compared with total population growth of Australia for the same periods, being 5.78% and 8.32% respectively, population growth in Hurstville local government area was marginally lower than the national average.[32] The median weekly income for residents within the City was generally on par with the national average.[1][33]

Selected historical census data for Hurstville local government area
Census year 2001[32] 2006[33] 2011[1]
Population Estimated residents on Census night 70,009 73,725 78,855
LGA rank in terms of size within New South Wales
% of New South Wales population 1.14%
% of Australian population Steady 0.37% Steady 0.37% Steady 0.37%
Cultural and language diversity
Ancestry,
top responses
Chinese 21.2%
Australian 15.9%
English 15.4%
Irish 5.2%
Greek 5.1%
Language,
top responses
(other than English)
Cantonese 9.3% Increase 10.8% Increase 11.2%
Mandarin 4.4% Increase 8.0% Increase 11.1%
Greek 5.0% Decrease 4.9% Decrease 4.8%
Arabic 4.0% Steady 4.0% Increase 4.1%
Macedonian 2.6% Steady 2.6% Steady 2.6%
Religious affiliation
Religious affiliation,
top responses
Catholic 27.0% Decrease 25.5% Decrease 24.2%
No religion 13.2% Increase 17.0% Increase 21.3%
Anglican 18.0% Decrease 15.2% Decrease 12.5%
Eastern Orthodox 9.4% Increase 9.9% Steady 9.9%
Buddhism n/c Increase 4.5% Increase 5.6%
Median weekly incomes
Personal income Median weekly personal income A$664 A$540
% of Australian median income 142.5% 93.6%
Family income Median weekly family income A$1,510 A$1,475
% of Australian median income 147.0% 99.6%
Household income Median weekly household income A$1,773 A$1,284
% of Australian median income 151.4% 104.0%

Council[edit]

Hurstville Civic Centre on McMahon Street, Hurstville, was the seat of the council from 1962 (1982 extension shown) until 2016.

Final composition and election method[edit]

Hurstville City Council was composed of twelve Councillors elected proportionally as three separate wards, each ward electing four Councillors. All Councillors were elected for a fixed four-year term of office. The Mayor and Deputy Mayor were elected annually by the Councillors at the first meeting of the Council in September. The last election was held on 8 September 2012, and the final makeup of the Council in the term 2012–2016, in order of election by ward, was as follows:[34][35][36]

Ward Councillor Party Notes
Hurstville [34][37]   Vince Badalati Labor Mayor 2015–2016.[38] Elected Georges River Hurstville Ward, 2017.
  Nancy Liu Unity Deputy Mayor 2013–2014. Elected Georges River Hurstville Ward, 2017.
  Colin Drane Labor Elected 2012–2016
  Brent Thomas Labor Elected 15 March 2014 by-election by vacancy of Andrew Istephan.[39]
  Andrew Istephan Liberal Deputy Mayor 2012–2013. Resigned 2 December 2013.[40]
Peakhurst [35]   Jack Jacovou Liberal Mayor 2012–2014. Resigned July 2015 (no by-election).[41]
  Michelle Stevens Independent Deputy Mayor 2014–2015
  Rita Kastanias Liberal Elected 2012–2016. Elected Georges River Peakhurst Ward, 2017.
  Philip Sansom Independent Deputy Mayor 2005–2006, 2008–2009.
Penshurst [36]   Justin Mining Labor Elected 2012–2016.
  Con Hindi Liberal Deputy Mayor 2009–2012. Elected Georges River Mortdale Ward, 2017.
  Dominic Sin Labor Deputy Mayor 2015–2016
  Christina Wu Liberal Elected 2012–2016. Elected Georges River Hurstville Ward, 2017.

Mayors[edit]

John Sproule (1838–1905), was three times Mayor (1890–1891, 1897–1898) and was the first Mayor of Canterbury from 1879 to 1880.
Mayor Party Term Notes
  Alexander Milsop Independent 23 June 1887 – 12 February 1889 [42][43][44]
  Hugh Patrick Independent 12 February 1889 – 13 February 1890 [45]
  John Sproule Independent 13 February 1890 – 28 May 1891 [46][47]
  Charles Bull Independent 28 May 1891 – 9 February 1893 [48][49]
  John George Griffin[50] Independent 9 February 1893 – 13 February 1895 [51][52][53][54]
  Charles Bull Independent 13 February 1895 – 15 August 1895 [55]
  Hugh Patrick Independent 19 August 1895 – 12 February 1896 [56]
  John Thompson Independent 12 February 1896 – 10 February 1897 [57]
  John Sproule Independent 10 February 1897 – 8 February 1898 [58][59]
  John George Griffin Independent 8 February 1898 – 14 February 1899 [60]
  Frederick Gamaliel Thompson Independent 14 February 1899 – 24 October 1900 [61][62]
  John Thompson Independent 24 October 1900 – 12 February 1902 [63][64]
  Edward Frank Fripp Independent 12 February 1902 – 29 May 1902 [65]
  Hugh Patrick Independent 29 May 1902 – 15 September 1902 [66]
  Henry Parkes Poulton Independent 15 September 1902 – 14 February 1905 [67][68][69]
  Charles Bede Hunt Independent 14 February 1905 – 13 February 1908 [70][71][72]
  Samuel Aston Independent 13 February 1908 – 4 February 1909 [73][74]
  Walter Matthew Musgrove Independent 4 February 1909 – 9 February 1910 [75]
  John Thompson Independent 9 February 1910 – 14 February 1911 [76]
  Samuel Aston Independent 14 February 1911 – 28 February 1911 [77]
  Alfred Leslie Blackshaw Independent 1 March 1911 – 27 September 1911 [78][79]
  Peter Anderson Young Low Independent 27 September 1911 – 7 February 1913 [80][81]
  Hugh Patrick Independent 7 February 1913 – 28 February 1914 [82][83]
  Edward Henry Baker Independent 1 March 1914 – 28 February 1915 [84]
  Alexander Grant Independent 1 March 1915 – 29 February 1916 [85]
  Ernest Alfred Bradford Independent 1 March 1916 – 4 July 1917 [86]
  Edward Henry Baker Independent 4 July 1917 – 28 February 1919 [87][88]
  Ernest Albert Field Independent 1 March 1919 – 14 August 1919 [89][90]
  James Spencer O'Neill Independent 22 August 1919 – 5 February 1920 [91]
  Thomas Valyer Cross Independent 5 February 1920 – 9 December 1920 [92][93]
  William Thomas Macken Independent 9 December 1920 – 7 December 1921 [94]
  Edward Henry Baker Independent 7 December 1921 – 2 December 1922 [95]
  William Thomas Macken Independent 7 December 1922 – 6 December 1923 [96]
  Alfred Edward Humphrey Independent 6 December 1923 – 4 December 1924 [97]
  Wallace Collier Independent 4 December 1924 – 9 December 1925 [98][99]
  Sydney Hall Binder Independent 9 December 1925 – 16 December 1926 [100][101]
  James Eli Webb Independent 16 December 1926 – 12 December 1927 [102][103]
  Ernest Albert Field Independent 12 December 1927 – 6 December 1928 [104]
  Henry Hill Independent 6 December 1928 – 11 December 1930 [105][106]
  Robert Alexander Patrick Independent 11 December 1930 – 8 December 1932 [107][108]
  Walter Ernest Smith Independent 8 December 1932 – 18 December 1933 [109]
  Robert Alexander Patrick Independent 18 December 1933 – 6 December 1934 [110]
  Walter Ernest Smith Independent 6 December 1934 – 16 December 1936 [111][112][113]
  Peter Anderson Young Low Independent 16 December 1936 – 8 December 1937 [114]
  George Thomas Cross Independent 8 December 1937 – 13 December 1938 [115]
  Hedley Richard Horace Mallard Independent 13 December 1938 – 13 December 1939 [116][117]
  Walter Ernest Smith Independent 13 December 1939 – 6 December 1945 [118][119][120][121][122]
  Oliver Arnold Olds Independent 6 December 1945 – 9 December 1948 [123][124][125]
  Norman Percy Lord Macpherson Independent 9 December 1948 – 6 December 1950 [126][127]
  Hedley Richard Horace Mallard Independent 6 December 1950 – 20 December 1955 [128][129][130]
  Michael Croot Independent 20 December 1955 – 15 December 1959 [128][131]
  Hedley Richard Horace Mallard Independent 15 December 1959 – 5 December 1960 [128]
  Harry Clifford Marsden Independent 5 December 1960 – 14 December 1961 [128]
  Gordon William 'Snowy' Hill Independent 14 December 1961 – 12 December 1963 [128]
  Allan Alexander Lawrance Independent 12 December 1963 – 14 December 1965 [128][132]
  Horace James Cable Independent 6 December 1965 – 6 December 1966 [128][133]
  Ernest Joseph Curlisa Labor 6 December 1966 – 28 September 1971 [134]
James Robert Walsh 28 September 1971 – 7 March 1974 [134]
  Ernest Joseph Curlisa Labor 7 March 1974 – 20 September 1974 [134]
  Michael Croot Independent 1 October 1974 – 18 September 1975 [134]
  Kevin Ryan Labor 18 September 1975 – 16 September 1976 [134]
Noel Vincent Bergin 16 September 1976 – 26 September 1977 [134]
Maxwell William Benn 26 September 1977 – 11 September 1978 [134]
  Gary Punch Labor 11 September 1978 – 12 April 1983 [134]
Albert Francis O'Connor 13 April 1983 – 18 September 1984 [134]
  Joan Loew Independent 18 September 1984 – 26 September 1987 [134][135]
  Bill Pickering Independent 6 October 1987 – 13 September 1988 [134]
  Bryan McDonald Labor 13 September 1988 – 20 September 1989 [134]
Robert Bruce Sharp 20 September 1989 – 17 September 1990 [134]
  Marie Ficarra Independent 17 September 1990 – 23 September 1991 [134]
  Mervyn Lynch Labor 23 September 1991 – 23 September 1992 [136][134]
  Bill Pickering Independent 23 September 1992 – 21 September 1994 [134]
  Bryan McDonald Labor 21 September 1994 – 25 September 1995 [134]
Peter Olah 25 September 1995 – 16 September 1998 [134]
  Michael Frawley Independent 16 September 1998 – 27 September 1999 [134]
  Philip Sansom Independent 27 September 1999 – 6 September 2000 [134]
  Bill Pickering Independent 6 September 2000 – 17 September 2001 [134]
  Vince Badalati Labor 17 September 2001 – 14 April 2004 [134]
Joanne Morris 14 April 2004 – 14 September 2005 [137][134]
Vince Badalati 14 September 2005 – 10 September 2009 [138]
  Philip Sansom Independent 10 September 2009 – 13 September 2011 [138]
  Steve McMahon Labor 13 September 2011 – 27 September 2012 [139][138]
  Jack Jacovou Liberal 27 September 2012 – 11 September 2014 [138]
Con Hindi 11 September 2014 – 9 September 2015 [140]
  Vince Badalati Labor 9 September 2015 – 12 May 2016 [141]

Coat of arms[edit]

Hurstville City Council adopted the current coat of arms as part of the Council’s centenary celebrations in 1987 and was designed by H. Ellis Tomlinson of the College of Arms.[142]

Coat of arms of City of Hurstville
Hurstville City Council (NSW) Coat of Arms, designed by H Ellis Tomlinson 1987.jpg
Motto
BY WISDOM AND COURAGE
Symbolism
Shield: The shield comprises Saint George's Cross, the blue representing the water of the Georges River, and three gum trees which symbolise the Council’s three wards (Hurstville Ward, Peakhurst Ward, and Penshurst Ward).
Crest: The crest features Saint George within a red walled crown. St George is included as the patron saint of Hurstville’s first church, guarding the region with a sword, and the civic crown references the early brick-making industry in the area.
Supporters: Two St George dragons, with feet resting on tree stumps, represent the early forestry industry of the Hurstville district.
Motto: The motto was first used in an earlier crest that celebrated Hurstville Council’s 75th anniversary.[142]

References[edit]

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