Huxham

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Huxham
Huxham, St Mary's church - geograph.org.uk - 767828.jpg
Huxham, St Mary's church
Huxham is located in Devon
Huxham
Huxham
Location within Devon
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townExeter
Postcode districtEX5
Dialling code01392
PoliceDevon and Cornwall
FireDevon and Somerset
AmbulanceSouth Western
EU ParliamentSouth West England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Devon
50°46′15″N 3°29′42″W / 50.770951°N 3.494959°W / 50.770951; -3.494959Coordinates: 50°46′15″N 3°29′42″W / 50.770951°N 3.494959°W / 50.770951; -3.494959

Huxham is a hamlet and civil parish in the county of Devon, England and the district of East Devon and lies about 3 miles from Exeter.[1] The parish has an area of about 800 acres[2] and is surrounded, clockwise from the north, by Rewe, Poltimore, Exeter and Stoke Canon.[3] It is too small to have a parish council and instead has a parish meeting.[4] It was formerly part of the Wonford Hundred and gave its name to a family who possessed the manor from the reign of Henry II to that of Edward III. The manor was then held by the Bampfylde family of Poltimore.[1]

Church[edit]

The church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin[5]. It was built in the early 14th century and rebuilt in 1865-71. It has a Norman font[6] and the screen may be very early in date.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lysons, Daniel; Lysons, Samuel (1822). Magna Britannia: Volume 6, Devonshire. British History Online. London. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  2. ^ GB Historical GIS / University of Portsmouth. "Huxham CP/AP through time: Population Statistics: Area (acres)". A Vision of Britain through Time. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  3. ^ "Map of Devon Parishes" (PDF). Devon County Council. Retrieved 20 November 2016.
  4. ^ "Huxham Parish Meeting". Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  5. ^ St Mary the Virgin, Huxham | A Church Near You
  6. ^ Hoskins, W.G. (2003). Devon. Phillimore. p. 414. ISBN 978-1-86077-270-2.
  7. ^ Pevsner, Nikolaus; Cherry, Bridget (1991). Devon. The buildings of England (2nd ed.). Yale University Press. p. 498. ISBN 0-300-09596-1.