Hybrid power

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Early hybrid power system. The gasoline/kerosine engine drives the dynamo which charges the storage battery

Hybrid power are combinations between different technologies to produce power.

In power engineering, the term 'hybrid' describes a combined power and energy storage system.[1] It does not mean a "method," such as the popular use of hybrid to mean a hybrid electric vehicle like the Toyota Prius. Although the drive train in the Toyota Prius can accurately be described as a hybrid power system.

Examples of power producers used in hybrid power are photovoltaics, wind turbines, and various types of Engine-generators - e.g. diesel gen-sets.[2]

Hybrid power plants often contain a renewable energy component (such as PV) that is balanced via a second form of generation or storage such as a diesel genset, fuel cell or battery storage system. They can also provide other forms of power such as heat for some applications.[3][4]

Hybrid power system[edit]

Hybrid systems, as the name implies, combine two or more modes of electricity generation together, usually using renewable technologies such as solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind turbines. Hybrid systems provide a high level of energy security through the mix of generation methods, and often will incorporate a storage system (battery, Fuel cell) or small fossil fueled generator to ensure maximum supply reliability and security.


References[edit]

  1. ^ Ginn, Claire. "Energy pick n' mix: are hybrid systems the next big thing?". www.csiro.au. CSIRO. Retrieved 9 September 2016. 
  2. ^ http://www.powerengineeringint.com/articles/print/volume-19/issue-8/features/fuel-savings-make-a-powerful-case-for-hybrid-diesel-generator-systems.html
  3. ^ Badwal, Sukhvinder P. S.; Giddey, Sarbjit S.; Munnings, Christopher; Bhatt, Anand I.; Hollenkamp, Anthony F. (24 September 2014). "Emerging electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies". Frontiers in Chemistry. 2. doi:10.3389/fchem.2014.00079. 
  4. ^ Ginn, Claire. "Energy pick n' mix: are hybrid systems the next big thing?". www.csiro.au. CSIRO. Retrieved 9 September 2016.