Hybris (mythology)

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Hybris
Personification of Insolence
AbodeErebus
Personal information
ParentsNyx and Erebus[1] or
Dyssebeia[2]
SiblingsMoros, Keres, Thanatos, Hypnos, Oneiroi, Momus, Oizys, Moirai, Nemesis, Apate, Philotes, Geras, Eris, Hesperides, Styx, Dolos, Ponos, Euphrosyne, Epiphron, Continentia, Misericordia, Pertinacia
OffspringKoros
Equivalents
Roman equivalentPetulantia

Hybris[pronunciation?] (Ancient Greek: Ὕβρις means 'hubris') was a spirit (daemon) of insolence, violence, and outrageous behaviour. In Roman mythology, the personification was Petulantia who reflected the Greek conception of hubris.[citation needed]

Family[edit]

Hybris was the daughter of the primodial gods, Nyx (Night) and Erebus (Darkness)[3] or of Aether (Air) and Gaea (Earth).[4] In some accounts, her mother was Dyssebia (Impiety).[5]

Aeschylus' account[edit]

I have a timely word of advice: arrogance (hybris) is truly the child of impiety (dyssebia), but from health of soul comes happiness, dear to all, much prayed for.[6]

Hyginus' account[edit]

From Nox/ Nyx (Night) and Erebus [were born]: Fatum/ Moros (Fate), Senectus/ Geras (Old Age), Mors/ Thanatos (Death), Letum/ Ker (Dissolution), Continentia (Moderation), Somnus/ Hypnos (Sleep), Somnia/ Oneiroi (Dreams), Amor/ Eros (Love)--that is Lysimeles, Epiphron (Prudence), Porphyrion, Epaphus, Discordia/ Eris (Discord), Miseria/ Oizys (Misery), Petulantia/ Hybris (Wantonness), Nemesis (Envy), Euphrosyne (Good Cheer), Amicitia/ Philotes (Friendship), Misericordia/ Eleos (Compassion), Styx (Hatred); the three Parcae/ Moirai (Fates), namely Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos; the Hesperides.[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface as Petulantia
  2. ^ Aeschylus, Eumenides 533.
  3. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface as the goddess Petulantia
  4. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface as the goddess Superbia
  5. ^ Aeschylus, Eumenides 533.
  6. ^ Aeschylus, Eumenides 532–534. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  7. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface as the goddess Petulantia Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.

References[edit]