Toronto and York Radial Railway

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Toronto and York Radial Railway
Locale Toronto
Dates of operation 1904–1927 (T&YRR)
1927–1948 (TTC)
Headquarters Toronto

The Toronto and York Radial Railway was a transit operator providing services to the suburbs of Toronto, Canada. It was a subsidiary of the Toronto Railway Company.[1] The company was created by merging four Toronto-area railway operations. The company was part of the empire of railway entrepreneurs Sir William Mackenzie and Donald Mann which included the Canadian Northern Railway and the parent Toronto Railway Company.

Lines[edit]

The table lists the 4 lines composing the T&YRR. Each line became a separate division of the T&YRR except for the Schomberg and Aurora which was a branch of the Metropolitan Division. Click on the predecessor company name for further details about each line. In 1904, the four predecessor companies were merged to form the Toronto and York Radial Railway.

Line Predecessor company
that created the line
Maximum extent of line under T&YRR Line
Opened
Line
Closed
Metropolitan
(Lake Simcoe)
Metropolitan Street Railway CPR midtown line – Sutton 1885 1930
Schomberg and Aurora Schomberg and Aurora Railway Schomberg Junction (Oak Ridges, south of Aurora) – Schomberg 1904 1927
Mimico Toronto and Mimico Electric Railway and Light Company SunnysidePort Credit 1892 1935
Scarboro Toronto and Scarboro' Electric Railway, Light and Power Company Kingston Road & Queen Street – West Hill 1893 1936

Timeline[edit]

Pre-T&YRR era (1885-1904)[edit]

Events prior to the merger creating the T&YRR in 1904

In 1885, the Metropolitan Street Railway Company of Toronto (incorporated March 2, 1877, renamed Metropolitan Railway Company in 1997) started a horsecar line on Yonge Street.[2]

On September 1890, electric service began on the Metropolitan line.[2]

On 16 July 16, 1892, the Toronto and Mimico Electric Railway and Light Company (incorporated November 14, 1890) began initial service between Sunnyside (Toronto) and the Humber River.[2]

On July 1 1893, the Toronto and Scarboro' Electric Railway, Light and Power Company (incorporated August 18, 1892) started electric, radial operations.[2]

On July 5, 1893, the Toronto Railway Company acquired controlling interest in the Toronto and Mimico Electric Railway and Light Company.[2]

On July 10, 1893, the Toronto and Mimico Electric Railway and Light Company extended service from Humber River to Mimico Creek, and further to Etobicoke Creek (Long Branch) on September 29, 1893.[2]

On March 6, 1895, the Toronto Railway Company acquired controlling interest in the Toronto and Scarboro' Electric Railway, Light and Power Company.[2]

By 1899, the Metropolitan line was extended to Aurora and Newmarket.[2]

In 1903, Toronto and Mimico Electric Railway and Light Company changed its name to the Toronto and Mimico Railway Company.[2]

Mackenzie & Mann era (1904-1921)[edit]

Events when the T&YRR was under the control of William Mackenzie and Donald Mann

On August 1, 1904, the T&YRR merged four rail operations, converting them into three T&YRR divisions, with the Metropolitan Division having a branch line:[3]

In 1904, regular passenger service started on the Schomberg and Aurora Branch of the T&YRR's Metropolitan Division. At this time, the line operated with steam trains.[3]

On December 24, 1905, the Mimico line was extended from Long Branch to Port Credit.[2]

On June 1, 1907, the T&YRR opened a 40 km (25 mi) extension of the Metropolitan line from Newmarket to Jackson's Point.[3]

On January 1, 1909, the T&YRR opened a 2.4 km (1.5 mi) extension of the Metropolitan line from Jackson's Point to Sutton.[3]

On June 25, 1915, a City of Toronto work team ripped up the tracks of the Metropolitan Line along Yonge Street from the CPR crosstown line north to Farnham Avenue. This was a result of a dispute between the city lead by Mayor Tommy Church and the T&YRR. Mayor Church complained about the "inadequate services provided by the Mackenzie-Mann traction companies" which included the Toronto Railway Company as well as the T&YRR. This was the first contraction of the T&YRR, albeit only 400 metres (1,300 ft) long.[4]

In 1916, electrification of the Schomberg and Aurora Branch was completed.[3]

In 1921, a plebiscite approved the purchase by the City of Toronto of the Toronto Railway Company and the T&YRR.[4] The Toronto Transportation Commission was to operate all radial lines within the city limits.[5]

On September 1, 1921, the TTC took over operation of all streetcar operations in the city, and shortly after took control those portions of the Scarboro and Mimico radial within the city limits.[5]

By fall, 1921, the TTC took over the portion of the Metropolitan line on Yonge Street south of Glen Echo Road (at the city limit).[5]

Hydro Electric era (1922-1927)[edit]

Events when the T&YRR was managed by Hydro-Electric Railways

In August, 1922, the City of Toronto formally acquired the T&YRR lines.[6]

On November 1, 1922, operation of the T&YRR was taken over by Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ontario and run as the Hydro-Electric Railways: Toronto and York Division.[2] Hydro made improvements to both the Metropolitan and Mimico lines.[6]

After 1922, Hydro changed the gauge of the Mimico line from Toronto gauge to standard gauge.[6]

At the end of 1923, the T&YRR under Hydro management had a deficit. The City blamed Hydro mismanagement. Hydro blamed the TTC's acquisition of the profitable portions of the radial lines within the city limits.[6]

By 1925, Toronto City Council felt that integrating the radials within TTC operations would produce efficiency by avoiding duplication of carhouses and shops, by allowing the transfer of vehicles between radial and city lines to meet passenger demand, and by having firmer control over expenditures.[6]

TTC era (1927-1948)[edit]

Events when the TTC operated the T&YRR lines

On January 12, 1927, the Toronto Transportation Commission started operating the T&YRR lines under contract. The TTC now operated the second largest electric railway in North America with 585 kilometres (364 mi) of lines. Shortly after, the TTC converted the Mimico line from standard gauge to Toronto gauge.[6]

In June 1927, the Schomberg line was closed.[2]

In September, 1927, the Lake Simcoe (formerly T&YRR Metropolitan) line was changed from standard gauge to Toronto gauge.[6]

On March 16, 1930, the TTC closed the Metropolitan line.[6]

On July 17, 1930, the TTC reopened a portion of the defunct Lake Shore line between Richmond Hill and Toronto as the North Yonge Railways. This line was owned by area municipalities and operated under contract by the TTC.[2]

On February 9, 1935, the Long Branch-Port Credit radial service ended.[2]

On June 25, 1936, the Scarborough radial service ended.[2]

On October 9, 1948, service was terminated on the North Yonge Railways, the last surviving Toronto radial.[2]

Comments[edit]

Unlike the city systems, the radial (interurban) operators used larger rail cars.

Radial routes ceased due to introduction of inter-urban buses and new highways that allowed for better access to many areas served by rail service.

Rail service returned to some of the communities served by the T&YRR by regional rail service of GO Transit in the 1970s.

External links[edit]

Other Toronto area lines controlled by Sir William Mackenzie[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of Regional Transit at Toronto, Ontario
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Wyatt, David A. "History of Regional Transit in Toronto, Ontario". Retrieved 2016-05-01. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Robert M. Stamp (1989). Riding the Radials, Toronto's Suburban Electric Streetcar Lines. The Boston Mills Press. ISBN 1-55046-008-0. Retrieved 2016-04-16. Chapter 5 - The Toronto & York Radial Railway 
  4. ^ a b Robert M. Stamp (1989). Riding the Radials, Toronto's Suburban Electric Streetcar Lines. The Boston Mills Press. ISBN 1-55046-008-0. Retrieved 2016-04-16. Chapter 7 - Tommy Church vs. William Mackenzie 
  5. ^ a b c Robert M. Stamp (1989). Riding the Radials, Toronto's Suburban Electric Streetcar Lines. The Boston Mills Press. ISBN 1-55046-008-0. Retrieved 2016-04-16. Chapter 8 - Hydro Radials, Clean-Up Deals, and Waterfront Grabs 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Robert M. Stamp (1989). Riding the Radials, Toronto's Suburban Electric Streetcar Lines. The Boston Mills Press. ISBN 1-55046-008-0. Retrieved 2016-04-16. Chapter 9 - Who Wants to Run the Radials? 
Preceded by
None
Public Transit in Toronto - interurban street car
1904-1927
Succeeded by
Toronto Transportation Commission