Hydrogen water

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Hydrogen water is water with dissolved hydrogen gas (H2) similar to carbonated water in which the dissolved gas is carbon dioxide. It is tasteless since H2 is an odorless gas. There is limited scientific evidence that hydrogen water has any health benefits in humans, although its proponents make claims it provides such benefits as functioning as an antioxidant, reducing inflammation, reducing risk of metabolic syndrome, providing neuroprotection for various diseases, and reducing side effects associated with cancer radiation treatment.

Composition[edit]

Hydrogen water is made by dissolving gaseous molecular hydrogen into water under pressure, typically 7.0 mg per liter of water. Alternative means of hydrogen administration are by inhalation of a gas containing up to 4.6% hydrogen, by intravenous injection with a hydrogen-containing saline solution, or by topical application (to the skin).[1][2][3][4]

Health claims[edit]

There is no scientific consensus that hydrogen water has any health benefits in humans.[5] Hydrogen water proponents claim it has health benefits such as functioning as an antioxidant, reducing inflammation, reducing risk of metabolic syndrome, providing neuroprotection for various diseases, and reducing side effects associated with cancer radiation treatment.[1][6][7][8][2][3][4] Very little work has been done in animals. A few articles have been published on the topic, but the clinical literature is sparse and what has been published covers many conditions, but not multiple trials of any one condition.[1][6][7][8][2][3][4] None of these articles are systematic reviews or meta-analyses.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c LeBaron TW, Kura B, Kalocayova B, Tribulova N, Slezak J (2019). "A New Approach for the Prevention and Treatment of Cardiovascular Disorders. Molecular Hydrogen Significantly Reduces the Effects of Oxidative Stress". Molecules. 24 (11). doi:10.3390/molecules24112076. PMID 31159153.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ a b c Iida A, Nosaka N, Yumoto T, Knaup E, Naito H, Nishiyama C (2016). "The Clinical Application of Hydrogen as a Medical Treatment". Acta Med Okayama. 70 (5): 331–337. doi:10.18926/AMO/54590. PMID 27777424.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  3. ^ a b c Shen M, Zhang H, Yu C, Wang F, Sun X (2014). "A review of experimental studies of hydrogen as a new therapeutic agent in emergency and critical care medicine". Med Gas Res. 4: 17. doi:10.1186/2045-9912-4-17. PMC 4406336. PMID 25905011.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ a b c Ohta S (2014). "Molecular hydrogen as a preventive and therapeutic medical gas: initiation, development and potential of hydrogen medicine". Pharmacol Ther. 144 (1): 1–11. doi:10.1016/j.pharmthera.2014.04.006. PMID 24769081.
  5. ^ Miller, Korin (April 28, 2017). "What Is Hydrogen Water, and Does It Actually Work?". Self. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  6. ^ a b Tan X, Shen F, Dong WL, Yang Y, Chen G (2018). "The role of hydrogen in Alzheimer's disease". Med Gas Res. 8 (4): 176–180. doi:10.4103/2045-9912.248270. PMC 6352568. PMID 30713672.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  7. ^ a b Zhang Y, Tan S, Xu J, Wang T (2018). "Hydrogen Therapy in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases: from Bench to Bedside". Cell Physiol Biochem. 47 (1): 1–10. doi:10.1159/000489737. PMID 29763888.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. ^ a b Zheng Y, Zhu D (2016). "Molecular Hydrogen Therapy Ameliorates Organ Damage Induced by Sepsis". Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2016: 5806057. doi:10.1155/2016/5806057. PMC 4931094. PMID 27413421.