Hydroxymethylpentylcyclohexenecarboxaldehyde

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Hydroxymethylpentylcyclohexenecarboxaldehyde[1]
Lyral.png
Names
IUPAC name
4-(4-Hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)-1-cyclohex-3-enecarboxaldehyde
Other names
Lyral, Kovanol, Mugonal, Landolal
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.046.225
EC Number 250-863-4
Properties
C13H22O2
Molar mass 210.317 g·mol−1
Density 0.995 g/mL at 20 °C
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Hydroxymethylpentylcyclohexenecarboxaldehyde is a synthetic fragrance known by the trade names Lyral, Kovanol, Mugonal, Landolal. It is found in some soaps, eau de toilettes, aftershaves and deodorants.

Synthesis[edit]

Typical synthesis starts from myrcene[2] and involves a Diels–Alder reaction with acrolein to produce the cyclohexenecarbaldehyde group, this species is marketed as a fragrance in its own right, most commonly under the name 'myrac aldehyde'. Oxidation of this completes the synthesis by forming the tertiary alcohol.

Safety[edit]

Lyral is known to act as a skin allergen and is listed as such in EU Directive 76/768/EEC.[3] It is commonly tested for in patients undergoing patch testing.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 4-(4-Hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)-3-cyclohexene-1-carboxaldehyde at Sigma-Aldrich
  2. ^ Fahlbusch, K.-G.; Hammerschmidt, F.-J.; Panten, J.; Pickenhagen, W.; Schatkowski, D.; Bauer, K.; Garbe, D.; Surburg, H. (2002). "Flavors and Fragrances". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a11_141. ISBN 3527306730.
  3. ^ Allergens in Cosmetics & Personal Care Products
  4. ^ Bruze, Magnus; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Goossens, An (March 2008). "Recommendation to include fragrance mix 2 and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (Lyral) in the European baseline patch test series". Contact Dermatitis. 58 (3): 129–133. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.2007.01292.x.