I'll Be Gone in the Dark

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I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer
AuthorMichelle McNamara
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreNon-fiction
Publication date
February 27, 2018
Media typeBook
Pages352
OCLC988857242

I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer is a true crime book by Michelle McNamara about the Golden State Killer. The book was released posthumously on February 27, 2018, nearly two years after McNamara's death.

McNamara became interested in the Golden State Killer case and wrote an article for Los Angeles magazine about the serial killer in 2013. She then signed a book deal with HarperCollins and began to work on a book about the case.

McNamara herself coined the moniker "Golden State Killer"[1] to refer to the serial killer/rapist who had previously been referred to by various other names (e.g., Original Night Stalker, East Area Rapist, and the Diamond Knot Killer).[2]

McNamara died in her sleep on April 21, 2016, at the age of 46. At the time of her death, she had been in the middle of her hunt for the killer, and her book was unfinished. Crime writer Paul Haynes, investigative journalist Billy Jensen, and McNamara's widower Patton Oswalt helped finish the book after McNamara’s death.

The book – McNamara's debut – was released on February 27, 2018 (almost two years after her death) and reached the top of The New York Times Best Seller list for non-fiction.[3] The book remained on the list for fifteen weeks.[4]

I'll Be Gone in the Dark contains an introduction by Gillian Flynn and an afterword by Oswalt.

In April 2018, HBO announced that they had purchased the rights for I'll Be Gone in the Dark and were developing it into a documentary series.[5] Filming for the series began on April 24, 2018.[6]

On April 25, 2018, the Sacramento Police announced the April 24 arrest of a suspect in the Golden State Killer case: 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo (born November 8, 1945). DeAngelo, a former police officer in Auburn and Exeter, California,[7] was arrested and charged with six counts of first-degree murder.[8][9][10] Authorities in Sacramento, Orange, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties are preparing charges against DeAngelo for all twelve of the murders in the Golden State Killer case.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Patton Oswalt Remembers His Wife, Michelle McNamara: 'She Steered Her Life With Joyous, Wicked Curiosity'". Time. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  2. ^ McNamara, Michelle (February 27, 2013). "In the Footsteps of a Killer". Los Angeles. Archived from the original on October 20, 2017. Retrieved October 7, 2015.
  3. ^ Canfield, David (March 7, 2018). "Michelle McNamara's posthumous I'll Be Gone in the Dark is a No. 1 best-seller". Entertainment Weekly.
  4. ^ "New York Times Best-Sellers: Hardcover Nonfiction". The New York Times. Retrieved July 15, 2018.
  5. ^ Andreeva, Nellie; Petski, Denise. "Docuseries Based On Michelle McNamara's 'I'll Be Gone In The Dark' True-Crime Book In Works At HBO". Deadline.
  6. ^ Raphael, Michele (April 25, 2018). "Arrest of 'Golden State Killer' Mirrors Prediction in Michelle McNamara's Book". L.A. Weekly. Retrieved April 26, 2018.
  7. ^ Myers, Paul (April 25, 2018). "Sacramento Sheriff's Department arrests Visalia Ransacker, confirms he was an officer of the Exeter Police Department in 1973". The Sun Gazette. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  8. ^ "Ex-Cop Arrested in Golden State Killer Case: 'We Found the Needle in the Haystack'". The New York Times. April 25, 2018. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 26, 2018.
  9. ^ Egel, Benjy (April 25, 2018). "Who is the East Area Rapist? Police say it's this ex-cop who attended Folsom High". The Sacramento Bee. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  10. ^ Stanglin, Doug (April 25, 2018). "Golden State Killer: Ex-cop Joseph James DeAngelo arrested as suspect in serial murder-rapes". USA TODAY. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  11. ^ Lillis, Ryan (April 25, 2018). "Here's where East Area Rapist suspect worked for nearly three decades before retiring". Sacramento Bee. Retrieved April 26, 2018.