I've Heard That Song Before

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This article is about the musical standard. For the Patti Page album, see I've Heard That Song Before (album).
"I've Heard That Song Before"
Song by Martha O'Driscoll (dubbed by Margaret Whiting)]
Published 1942
Composer(s) Jule Styne
Lyricist(s) Sammy Cahn
Language English

"I've Heard That Song Before" is a 1942 popular song with music by Jule Styne and lyrics by Sammy Cahn.[1] It was introduced by Martha O'Driscoll (dubbed by Margaret Whiting) in the 1942 film Youth on Parade.

It was recorded by Harry James and his Orchestra with Helen Forrest on vocal on July 31, 1942. This was the last day of recording before the Musician Union's ban. The recording was issued on Columbia 36668 and became a number one hit on both the pop and the Harlem Hit Parade in the USA in early 1943.[2] This version of the song can be heard in Woody Allen's 1986 movie Hannah and Her Sisters.

Recorded versions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gilliland, John (1994). Pop Chronicles the 40s: The Lively Story of Pop Music in the 40s (audiobook). ISBN 978-1-55935-147-8. OCLC 31611854.  Tape 1, side A.
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 291. 
  3. ^ Al Hirt, They're Playing Our Song at Discogs. Retrieved April 13, 2013.
  • Jacobs, Dick & Jacobs, Harriet: Who Wrote That Song? Writer's Digest Books, 2nd Edition 1992
Preceded by
"There Are Such Things"
by Tommy Dorsey and His Orchestra with vocal refrain by Frank Sinatra and the Pied Pipers
The Billboard National Best Selling Retail Records number-one single
(Harry James and His Orchestra version)

March 6, 1943 – May 22, 1943 (twelve weeks)
June 5, 1943 (one week)
Succeeded by
"That Old Black Magic"
by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra with vocal refrain by Skip Nelson and the Modernaires
Preceded by
"That Old Black Magic"
by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra with vocal refrain by Skip Nelson and the Modernaires
Succeeded by
"Taking a Chance on Love"
by Benny Goodman and His Orchestra with vocal chorus by Helen Forrest
Preceded by
"Don't Stop Now"
by the Bunny Banks Trio with vocal chorus by Bonnie Davis
The Billboard Harlem Hit Parade number-one single
(Harry James and His Orchestra version)

April 17, 1943 (one week)
Succeeded by
"I Can't Stand Losing You" by the Ink Spots