IAU 50 km World Championships

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IAU 50 km World Championships
SportUltramarathon
Inaugural season2005
CountryWorldwide
Official websitehttp://www.iau-ultramarathon.org/

The IAU 50 km World Championships is an annual, global ultrarunning competition over 50 kilometres organized by the International Association of Ultrarunners (IAU).

The competition began life as the IAU 50 km World Trophy in 2005. It served as the final leg of the IAU 50 km Challenge circuit, with runners gaining qualification through performances on one of the nine preceding qualifying races. The winners of the men's and women's trophy were decided by the best aggregate time of their World Trophy race plus their best time from the qualifying round.[1][2] The race moved away from aggregate scoring, with the World Trophy race becoming a straight final, and it continued in this format up to 2014.[3][4] The 2008 and 2013 editions were cancelled due to the number of world championships the IAU was already organised that year.[5]

The inaugural World Championship event took place in Doha, Qatar in December 2015. This included men's and women's races with individual and team elements. The team titles were decided by the three best combined times set by a nation's runners at the competition.[6] For 2014 to 2017 it was agreed that the competition would be hosted in Doha for those years, moving the competition away from its tradition of changing host each year.[4] The competition signalled commitment to the sport in Qatar, with Doha hosting its first ultramarathon in the months preceding the 2014 championship.[7]

It is one of four world championships organised by the IAU, with the others being the IAU 100 km World Championships, IAU 24 Hour World Championship and the IAU Trail Running World Championships.[8]

The inaugural edition in 2005 incorporated a European Championship race. Oleg Kharitonov was the men's winner, with World Trophy winner Sandor Barcza as runner-up and Stefano Sartori in third. The European Championship and World Trophy places matched on the women's side, with Heather Foundling-Hawker winner of both. The European Championship was abandoned after the launch of the World Championships. It had only been held twice (Mario Ardemagni and Danielle Sanderson were the 2004 winners).[9]

Editions[edit]

  Editions in gold were held as IAU 50 km World Trophy Final
Edition Year City Country Date No. of athletes No. of nations
01st 2005[10] Palermo Italy 16 October
02nd 2006[11] Winschoten Netherlands 16 September
03rd 2007[12] Palermo Italy 14 October
04th 2008
05th 2009[13] Gibraltar United Kingdom 31 October
06th 2010[14] Galway Ireland 29 August
07th 2011[15] Assen Netherlands 20 August
08th 2012[16] Vallecrosia Italy 20 October
09th 2013
10th 2014[17] Doha Qatar 31 October
01st 2015 Doha Qatar 4 December
02nd 2016 Doha Qatar 11 November
03rd 2017 canceled[18]
04th 2018 cancelled[19]
05th 2019 Brașov Romania 1 September 73
06th 2020 bids open[19]

Medal summary[edit]

Men[edit]

Year Gold Silver Bronze
2005  Sandor Barcza (FRA) 6:05:33  Oleg Kharitonov (RUS) 6:15:40  Aleksandr Boltachev (RUS) 6:21:56
2006  Dimitry Bula (BLR) 3:06:52  Dominic Croft (GBR) 3:08:25  Rod Harris (GBR) 3:09:02
2007  Marc Papanikitas (BEL) 3:06:36  Julian Rendall (GBR) 3:09:39  Bernard Santner (AUT) 3:12:44
2009  Lucas Nonyana (RSA) 2:58:03  Paul Molyneux (GBR) 3:00:15  Michael Wardian (USA) 3:00:56
2010  Collen Makaza (ZIM) 2:47:22  Sandile Ngunuza (RSA) 2:53:06  Michael Wardian (USA) 2:54:57
2011  Eliot Kiplagat Biwott (KEN) 2:54:53  Pieter Vermeesch (BEL) 2:57:23  Kaito Iwayama (JPN) 2:59:12
2012  Steven Way (GBR) 2:53:41  Collen Makaza (ZIM) 2:57:49  Paul Martelletti (GBR) 2:58:18
2014  Collen Makaza (ZIM) 3:00:41  Phil Anthony (GBR) 3:01:26  Harm Sengers (NED) 3:05:01
2015  Tony Migliozzi (USA) 2:52:08  Arnold Kiptaoi (KEN) 2:55:34  Samuel Ongaki (KEN) 2:56:15
2016  Tony Migliozzi (USA) 2:54:02  Tyler Andrews (USA) 2:56:04  Collen Makaza (ZIM) 2:56:58
2017 Did not held
2018
2019  Iraitz Arrospide (ESP) 2:47:42  Lungile Gongqa (RSA) 2:48:26  Daniel Nash (GBR) 2:49:01

Women[edit]

Year Gold Silver Bronze
2005  Heather Foundling-Hawker (GBR) 7:20:46  Monica Casiraghi (ITA) 7:32:45  Lorena Di Vito (ITA) 7:35:14
2006  Zelah Morrall (GBR) 3:31:19  Sarah Tucker (GBR) 3:32:08  Fiona Davies (GBR) 3:35:15
2007  Monica Carlin (ITA) 3:32:17  June Petrie (AUS) 3:35:38  Sabine Hofer (AUT) 3:36:07
2009  Kami Semick-Pardue (USA) 3:29:48  Monica Carlin (ITA) 3:37:10  Lesley Train-Austin (RSA) 3:38:23
2010  Susan Harrison (GBR) 3:15:43  Mary Coordt (USA) 3:28:31  Irene Kalter (NED) 3:34:22
2011  Emma Gooderham (GBR) 3:17:30  Susan Harrison (GBR) 3:25:05  Joasia Zakrzewski (GBR) 3:26:37
2012  Helen Taranowski (GBR) 3:30:43  Emma Gooderham (GBR) 3:33:32  Michele Chiefari (ITA) 3:37:45
2014  Emily Harrison (USA) 3:32:30  Joanna Zakrzewski (GBR) 3:33:23  Catrin Jones (CAN) 3:37:57
2015  Camille Herron (USA) 3:20:59  Marija Vrajić (CRO) 3:28:15  Catrin Jones (CAN) 3:28:19
2016  Risper Kimaiyo (KEN) 3:22:45  Nele Alder-Baerens (GER) 3:25:53  Amy Clements (GBR) 3:26:17
2017 Did not held
2018
2019  Alyson Dixon (GBR) 3:07:20  Helen Davies (GBR) 3:09:16  Alicia Pérez (ESP) 3:15:09

Men's team[edit]

Year Gold Silver Bronze
2015  Kenya (KEN) 8:49:09  United States (USA) 8:57:52  Australia (AUS) 9:37:51
2016  United States (USA) 8:56:37  Great Britain (GBR) 8:59:29  Germany (GER) 9:45:58
2017 Did not held
2018
2019  South Africa (RSA) 8:28:38  Germany (GER) 8:35:52  Great Britain (GBR) 8:41:00

Women's team[edit]

Year Gold Silver Bronze
2015  Croatia (CRO) 10:50:08  Canada (CAN) 11:10:41  Australia (AUS) 11:31:40
2016  Great Britain (GBR) 10:36:01  United States (USA) 10:40:00  Croatia (CRO) 11:26:36
2017 Did not held
2018
2019  Great Britain (GBR) 9:39:33  United States (USA) 10:03:18  Austria (AUT) 10:19:58

References[edit]

  1. ^ IAU 50 km Trophy: Kharitonov wins in Palermo, overall title to Barzca, Foundling-Hawker women's winner. IAAF (2005-10-16). Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  2. ^ IAU 50 Kilometres Trophy. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  3. ^ Khan, Nadeem (2014-10-29). Anthony and Harrison the favourites for IAU 50km World Trophy Final. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  4. ^ a b Mulkeen, Jon (2014-11-01). Makaza regains IAU world 50km title, Harrison takes women's crown. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  5. ^ Dates announced by the IAU . Planet Ultramarahon (2008-01-12). Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  6. ^ Minshull, Phil (2015-12-04). USA's Migliozzi and Herron take gold at the IAU 50km World Championships. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  7. ^ Aspire Logistics to host IAU 50km final. Gulf Times (2014-03-06). Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  8. ^ IAU Championships. International Association of Ultrarunners. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  9. ^ IAU EUropean 50 km Trophy. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2016-07-09.
  10. ^ 50km Palermo Supermarathon (IAU Trophy Final) (ITA). IAU. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  11. ^ RUN Winschoten 50 km (IAU Trophy Final) (NED). IAU. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  12. ^ 50km Palermo Supermarathon (IAU Trophy Final) (ITA). IAU. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  13. ^ IAU 50km World Trophy Final, Gibraltar (GBR). IAU. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  14. ^ IAU 50km World Trophy Final, Galway (IRL). IAU. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  15. ^ 4. Internationale Ultraloop 50 van Assen (IAU Trophy Final) (NED). IAU. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  16. ^ 50 km Lungo Il Mare (ITA). IAU. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  17. ^ IAU 50k Trophy Final (QAT). IAU. Retrieved on 2016-07-08.
  18. ^ No World Championships 50Km 2017 in Doha, on: iau-ultramarathon.org, date march 28th 2017, retrieved April 14th 2017
  19. ^ a b No IAU 50K World Championship in 2018.

External links[edit]