IBM 4300

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The IBM 3310 and IBM 3370 direct access storage (disk) drives[NB 1] were introduced with/for the IBM 4300

The IBM 4300 series[1][2][3][4][5] were mid-range systems compatible with System/370[2] that were sold from 1979 through 1992. They featured modest electrical and cooling requirements, and thus did not require a data center environment.

Each model - 4331, 4341, 4361, and 4381 - had various sub-models, such as the 4341 model 1 (or 4341-1) and 4341 model 2 (4341-2).

The 4381-13 through 4381-24 (announced in 1987) were entry-level machines for the 370/XA architecture. They were positioned between the IBM 9370 and IBM 3090 in performance at the time of announcement.

The 4381-3, 4381-14, 4381-24 and 4381-92 are dual-CPU models. Other models included 1, 2, 11, 12, 13, 21, 22, 23, 90 and 91.

Model Announced Withdrawn Max Memory Approximate Performance
4331 1979 1981 8MB 4 × 370/115
4341 1979 1986 16MB 3.2 × 370/138
4361 1983 1987 12MB 3 × 4331
4381 1983 1992 64MB 9 × 4341

IBM 4321[edit]

The IBM 4321 was announced November 18, 1981.[1]

IBM 4331[edit]

The IBM 4331 (and the 4341) were announced Jan 30, 1979[2] It came with an integrated adapter that permitted attaching up to 16 of two newly introduced Direct-access storage devices (DASD):

  • The IBM 3310, described as having "a storage capacity of 64.5 million characters." It was to be used with "Storage disks .. sealed to reduce the possibility of damage, loss, misuse or contamination."
  • The IBM 3370 up to 571 million characters. The 3370 could also be used with an IBM 4341.

(The 4331 was withdrawn Nov 18, 1981)

IBM 4341[edit]

The IBM 4341 (and the 4331) were announced Jan 30, 1979[3] Like the 4331, it came with an integrated adapter that permitted attaching up to 16 of the newly introduced IBM 3370 DASD. The 4341 did not support the much lower capacity IBM 3310.

Oct. 20, 1982 IBM announced a new entry-level processor, Model Group 9 and a new top-of-the-line 4341, Model Group 12.

(The 4341 was withdrawn Feb 11, 1986)

IBM 4361[edit]

The IBM 4361 Model Groups 4 & 5 were announced Sept. 15, 1983.
Model Group 3 was announced the following year, Sept. 12, 1984.

New features[edit]

Among the new/optional features for the 4361 were:

  • Auto-Start—automatically turns on the processor by telephone via the Remote Operator Control Facility or at a predetermined time and day of the week. The processor powers on and proceeds with initial microcode load, sets the clock and loads the system.

APL keyboard[edit]

High-Accuracy Arithmetic Facility[edit]

While Floating-Point Arithmetic capability has long been part of computing history,[6] this feature's advancement, conceptualization of which had been under development for decades,[7] was implemented as an optional feature on the 4361.[4][8][9]

(The 4361 was withdrawn Feb. 17, 1987)

IBM 4381[edit]

The IBM 4381 had a greater longevity than any of the above systems.
Model Groups 1 & 2 were announced Sep 15, 1983 and withdrawn Feb 11, 1986.
Model Group 3 was announced Oct 25, 1984 and withdrawn Feb 11, 1986.
Model Groups 11, 12, 13 & 14 were announced Feb 11, 1986.
Model Groups 21, 22, 23 & 24 were announced May 19, 1987 and withdrawn Aug 19, 1992.

Operating systems[edit]

New releases of:

  • Disk Operating System/Virtual Storage Extended (DOS/VSE)[10]
  • Virtual Machine Facility/370 (VM/370) Release 6
  • Operating System/Virtual Storage 1 (OS/VS1) Release 7

supported the 4300 series as well as other System/370-compatible processors.

For the 4321 and 4331:

Other[edit]

  • Hughes Aircraft Company was the first IBM customer to install Endicott's initial IBM 4341 processor[11]
  • The IBM 4331 Model 2 was developed by the Boeblingen lab and manufactured in Endicott.[11]
  • The IBM 4341 Model 2 was developed by the intermediate systems group, and manufactured by SPD, in Endicott.[11]
  • Subsequent processors had development and manufacturing activities in Endicott,[NB 2] Havant, Boeblingen, Valencia, and Sumare.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ This is not the exact model/for illustrative purposes
  2. ^ Endicott is best known as the "Birthplace of IBM"

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "DPD chronology". IBM Archives. IBM. 
  2. ^ a b c "4331 Processor". IBM Archives. IBM. 
  3. ^ a b "4341 Processor". IBM Archives. IBM. 
  4. ^ a b "4361 Processor". IBM Archives. IBM. 
  5. ^ "4381 Processor". IBM Archives. IBM. 
  6. ^ 1960s, UNIVAC 1100, IBM 7094
  7. ^ Karlsruhe Accurate Arithmetic, which cites a 1971 PhD thesis
  8. ^ described by IBM as "High-Accuracy Arithmetic Facility: Allows computational procedures with algorithmic verification of results." and adds "New floating-point instructions are implemented for computation of basic arithmetic operations and the scalar product with maximum accuracy."
  9. ^ Kirchner, R.; Kulisch, U. (1988). "Accurate arithmetic for vector processors". Journal of Parallel and Distributed Computing. 5 (3): 250–70. doi:10.1016/0743-7315(88)90020-2. 
  10. ^ the announcement noted "based on DOS/VS"
  11. ^ a b c https://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/endicott/endicott_chronology1980.html
  12. ^ CW (1985-12-20). "Rechner liefern keine korrekten Ergebnisse - Neue Arithmetik der Karlsruher Forschungsgruppe Kulisch in der 4361 realisiert" [Computers don't deliver exact results - Karlsruhe research team Kulisch implements new computer arithmetic for the IBM 4361]. Computerwoche (in German). Karlsruhe, Germany: IDG Business Media GmbH. Archived from the original on 2016-05-30. Retrieved 2016-05-30.